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The Quest for the Missing Brick . It was from that lady's plea that the quest for the missing Lego brick began. . It was early morning when I stepped into the diner to meet my best friend again: coffee. I had anticipated a calm morning with my best friend in my hand and music in my ears. But of course, for a private eye, there never was a peaceful morning. For as I walked into the diner, the lady gave me a look. At first I thought she was just staring at my dazzling good looks - it was understandable after all. But she had something else in mind. She told me a tale.  The tale of her prized Lego brick, stolen as she had come home. She needed that brick. And she needed it now. Naturally a private eye comes across some strange stories during his career, but this one brought more questions to me than ever before. Why was her Lego brick so important? Why would it have been stolen? Who had done the dastardly deed? I turned to the lady to ask her my questions, but she was gone. Nowhere was she to be found. And the connection hit me like a falling piano. The same person that had stolen the brick had now kidnapped her as I looked away. There was no time to waste. I had to get to her as soon as possible. As I hurried out of the diner, I ran into a woman. Not taking the time to look up, I hurried away as she shouted at me. I didn't comprehend her words. There wasn't time for comprehension. But as I heard my name, I turned back with curiosity. How would she know my name? And the woman I saw was the fair lady from whom the Lego brick had been stolen. She had gotten up to get more of my best friend. I walked back to the table. As I sat down, she told me the reason of the importance. The value of the brick. Now this brick she had wasn't just your average red 2x4. It was a 2x5 brick. A brick so rare it was worth millions. Instantly I was interested again. And in that moment, in the corner of my eye, I noticed a man. Ed Gyles. Sitting next to us with a greedy expression on his face. And at that moment, I realized that he had heard what I just heard. You see, Gyles and I have a long history. Whether it be his stealing precious valuables from me before I can return them to their rightful owners, pushing me into a crowd of tourists just as I find the man I was looking for, or ramming my car to stop me from discovering buried treasure, we aren't the best of friends. And as soon as I saw his face, I knew that this meant trouble. So I went to my other enemy. An enemy more deadly than Gyles would have to work with me in my quest for justice. The library. With its pillars of evil and doors of eternal torment, it had done little other than confuse me in the past. But I needed to embrace my worst fear: books. I needed to find out who would have wanted to have that 2x5 brick. From the secret volumes of my enemy, I learned the perpetrator of the crime. It was one of a gang known as the Moccers. For with their cunning evilness, they wanted nothing less than to have the rarest Lego piece in existence. So I set out to find the gang. As I walked by the river, I heard words. In that silence, words were like a piercing dagger. There was no way of avoiding them as they reveal themselves to you. The man spoke of murder. A murder by the library. And in that instant I realized I had left too soon. For it was not just anyone who had been murdered. It was the leader of the gang: Andrew Sargent. And I realized that the robber had been robbed. For there was no reason that Sargent would have been murdered other than to take from him the precious brick. As I hurried back to the library, I heard footsteps back by the river. Gyles had followed me. I had to find a way to slow him down. He couldn't be allowed to reach the library before I did. So I left a cunning, foolproof trap for him. After getting a larger lead on Gyles, I reached the crime scene. But as I arrived there, I realized that being a private eye wouldn't be enough to get me closer to the victim. Only the police could get near the victim - or at least those who looked like the police. Luckily it wasn't too hard to get a police uniform. When I got close to the victim I noticed something was wrong. Every picture I had seen of Sargent showed him with a bag. The bag must have been stolen by the murderer. And there was only one reason it would have been stolen. The brick had been inside it. After doing some asking, I learned that the police had arrived at the crime scene just minutes after the body was found. The librarian had found the body mere seconds after the killing shots were fired. Which meant two things. The murderer was someone who knew Sargent well. Only someone who knew him well would have known where he was, that he had the brick, and that the brick was in his bag. There was no time for the murderer to search for the brick in the victim's clothes - he had to find it immediately. So the murderer had to know Sargent, or at least have watched him closely for the last few days. And the other piece of information? The murderer was still in town. For the murder was done exactly six minutes ago. And the murderer might have another victim. My lady. So I flew to her house. It took some extra time to get a flight to her home only a few miles away in a private jet, but it was worth the time. For just as I arrived at her house, I saw her in the window. She had a gun against her head. But the gang member - who I recognized as a man named Alex - had not yet noticed me. He was intent on interrogating her to learn who she had told of the missing brick. She lied again. "I told nobody!" she screamed. That was not the answer Alex was looking for. He kicked her. She shrieked. And at that moment her death was nigh. Had it not been for me. After my cunning trap succeeded yet again, I tied Alex up. Then I turned my attention to the maiden. And gave her the prized brick. And she thanked me. I didn't pay much attention. I could never listen to those teary endings anyway. But I promised to be there at her celebration the next day. She had invited all of her friends to visit her as she celebrated the return of her beloved 2x5 brick. But I felt empty inside that night. For I thought I had forgotten something - or someone. You see, you can't end a story without accounting for every little factor that could happen. And this story wasn't over yet. And finally it hit me. I hadn't dealt with Gyles. He was still out there. But there was still something wrong. He hadn't arrived at the Iibrary when after I tripped him. Sure, I had slowed him down some, but he should have arrived eventually. Which meant he hadn't gone to the library. He had gone elsewhere. To my house. To set a trap for me, so he could finally foil my plans. And suddenly the bed-a-pult he had installed launched me into the wall. I fell, stunned. And that was when I knew I would be late for the fair maiden's celebration. ________________________________________________________________ For my Moc-off against A Sargent.


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