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Seven Dirty Words
Since Ocean made the political MOC, and Young covered religion, I’ll take profanity. Who calls sex? Anyone? How about drugs?
About this creation
WARNING: Profanity ahead. Proceed no further unless you've heard them all before.

And I absolutely mean that. You may, by all means, turn around right now. Do not, I mean it, DO NOT scroll down any further unless you are 100% comfortable with profanity.


AUTHOR'S NOTE: I really lost in interest in this project about halfway through, which is unfortunate, because it's a tribute to one of my heroes. As a result, I'm a little hesitant to post this. But what the hell. Let's call it an off day. I just got back from vacation, people. I need to get back in my groove.

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A tribute to a stand-up legend.

“There are 400,000 words in the English language, and there are seven of them you can’t say on television. What a ratio that is. 399,993 to 7. They must really be bad…”
-George Carlin

“Those are the heavy seven. Those are the ones that’ll infect your soul, curve your spine, and keep the country from winning the war.”

*A thank-you to Mark Kelso for the inspiring the font.
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BONUS MATERIAL:

Overhead shot of the first three.

Outtake #1: Since this word is the baddest of the bad (at least in these parts), I figured I'd cover my ass and not only blow up the N, but stand the figure in front of it as well.

Outtake #2: That young woman is so flat-chested, it kind of defeats the purpose of having her in the shot.

Outtake #3: The best anagram I could make out of the remainder letters.

- - - - - - - - -

Time for some pontification:

My feelings on profanity mirror those of Carlin: “There are no bad words, only bad thoughts and bad intentions.” I understand that there are certain times when certain words shouldn’t be used; I can claim at least SOME social skills. But the stigma that these words bear has always intrigued me. What damage is done by dropping the F-bomb? Will it curve your spine, infect your soul? As far as I can tell, the only thing stopping anyone from saying a bad word is the fear of the repercussions: a slap on the wrist to keep you from saying it again, or an awkward silence and a drop in the social hierarchy. Most often, these fears are not unfounded. But my question is why. Why are the responses to bad words so negative? Is a point not made? Is profanity incompatible with insight? Is it superfluous? Ineffective? Lazy? Or that old chestnut: the telltale sign of bad upbringing?

My answer is none of the above. I don’t believe bad language deserves its bad reputation. I think taking offense to a bad word is an empty gesture. Profanity is inert, as all words are: it is the intention behind words that matters, that packs the punch. There's no offense to be taken from a bad word, unless it used in an insult, and even then, the words offend only by proxy. I don't view profanity an argumentative cop-out. A bad word is not the last refuge of a man with no argument, whose only hope is to desperately drive his point home with the F-bomb. I don't view profanity as superfluous or ineffective; far from it. The same words that may offend and insult may also inspire and enlighten. It's the context and intention of the words that distinguish between a punch to the gut and a tug of the heart.

Dissatisfied? Let me close with two examples. The first is a poem by e.e. cummings titled “the boys i mean are not refined”. It’s profane, obscene, vulgar, and a fine piece of work. So what’s to be learned? Should we put a black bar over the naughty parts and analyze the work as if it were squeaky clean? Should we disregard this poem as the one bad apple in cummings’ portfolio? Should we establish a new rule, one that views profanity from an esteemed poet as acceptable and profanity from everyone else unacceptable? Or should we expose the bad words as no different from the clean words on either side, and let the language - and cummings’ mastery of it - speak for itself? To leave the reputation of a bad word behind is to allow language, and with it conversation, to flourish.

The second example is taken from the film “Conversations with Other Women,” written by Gabrielle Zevin. This little-known film, starring Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter, forgoes the typical Hollywood romantic ending. It closes with Aaron’s character in the back of a taxi after losing the opportunity to stay with Helena’s character. He mindlessly chats with the cab driver. "You married?" he asks. The driver says yes. "You happy?" "Happy enough," the driver replies. “That’s good. It’s good to be happy," Aaron says. He pauses, lost in regret, before concluding, “It’s just so fuckin’ hard.” Cut to black, roll credits. That last line still lingers in my mind. It is a perfect fit, but without the one bad word, it wouldn’t have hit me nearly as hard. There is something honest and humanizing about profanity that gave that final line such an impact. Profanity is a tool, not a placeholder for some absent sentiment. A “bad word” can offer greater insight, greater honesty, and greater development to a character, a philosophy, an argument, etc. The challenge is using it correctly, and therein lies the source of the problem.

Profanity is a right, to be sure, but it fits like a privilege. Used poorly, it earns nothing more than an undeserved shock, sneer, or wince, and its potential is diminished. Used wisely, the doors are opened. Used wisely, it’s fucking poetry.



Comments

 I made it 
  June 27, 2010
Quoting Joe P. Just asking, but I wanna make one with funny things to say. I just want your approval. Thank you! ByeBye.
By all means, go right ahead.
 I like it 
  June 27, 2010
Well, by golly, you're just going to MAKE me add you as a favorite, now, aren't you? Brilliant. That about sums it up. The builds are very smart; the whole thing reeks of wit. I love it. Also, next time I stub my toe or hit my head on the cupboard door, I'll make sure to scream out "SON OF A HECTIC FORK SUCKER!!"
 I like it 
  June 27, 2010
Just asking, but I wanna make one with funny things to say. I just want your approval. Thank you! ByeBye.
Alex Eylar
 I like it 
Blake Buehl
  November 13, 2009
How is this not seting off Sean? Should I tell him?
 I like it 
  October 8, 2009
haha. nice job blocking out at least 1 letter in each of the words! funny too. i suprised spongebob would be hanging around that word!!
 I like it 
  October 2, 2009
I call drugs!
 I like it 
  June 16, 2009
Great build. Seeing as I go to Jr. High, I can tell, Thats pretty much spot on. Profanity is practically a way of life now, Its like a muscle (or something...I'm not such a deep, metaphysical guy). For Instance, a while back, I saw two guys walking down the hall, debating how to say the F-Word properly. As well as that, there's a bad word for almost every letter of the alphabet! Strange world we live in, indeed.
 I like it 
  December 15, 2008
Good, but what Thomas Mannay said, also the seven sweetest words should have meatball in there somewhere
  December 2, 2008
A lib accusing anyone of being communists [besides a member of the 3rd Reich] is laughable, when the left is the political aisle trying to get rid of free speech. So I laugh at you, Andrew. And Alex, keep stuff like this off of MOCpages, 3/4 of the population are under 12 years of age...keep it on Flickr.
 I like it 
  November 30, 2008
What?? I come back months later and find this spammed??? .... those spamming communists
 I like it 
  August 9, 2008
Ocean's right. He called me that last week! Full props for how they were "censored". Now then, I gotta agree with everything you said. I also feel that only someone as well spoken as you should be allowed to make this kind of moc. Ok, Who's got the sex one? Oh yeah, I took care of that already... ~ Chris.
 I made it 
  July 29, 2008
Yes, that's why I put the warning at the very top, in bold. Please heed the warning, people.
  July 29, 2008
um you know an 11 year old like me could find this dont you?
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
lol i love how you censored them...even though they're still blatantly obvious. Nice job with "Hectic Fork Suckers" by the way. Haha!
 I made it 
  July 27, 2008
To answer Giovanni and Delorean: the seven sweetest words, that could never be used to hurt anyone, could be SUMMER, HONEY, PURPLE, HUG, FLUTTER, PILLOW, and TACO.
 I made it 
  July 27, 2008
You haven't truly made a good MOC unless someone says "Shame on you". Sorry, ghost88, but MOCpages permits this kind of expression quite explicitly. Besides, we're all riding high on a Free Speech buzz; why would you want to harsh our mellow?
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
oh, frakkin' smeg! well said! what about the seven sweetest words?
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
I can't help thinking of A Christmas Story - " He worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium; a master!" And you said, "The challenge is in using it correctly." That pretty much sums it up to me. I'd hate for such words to loose their profane nature, honestly. They add flavor and texture to language by way of contrast. Like everything else, it can be overdone...but done right? Yep...poetry. Anyway, some great points and a wonderful way of illustrating the topic. A memorable MOC to be sure!
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
Amen brother. That was highly enjoyable-fantastic work! BTW we Aussies LOVE to use the C-word! It rocks. I use it so much I don't notice anymore. (I'm still laughing that Youngy said it below).
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
I beg to differ, Apple. The above words may MOSTLY represent spam, but not the last word, not the last word.
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
SWEET WORK, when he, you know, kicked the bucket, I made a vig of him
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
all these words describe one word and that is "SPAM"
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
And yet it doesn't set off any alarms in the MOCpages moderator's office. That's funnier still!
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
Oooooh, you said the F-word! I'm telling! Funny, a girl told me once I couldn't use the word "cunt." I didn't even say it, a character in a story I wrote used it. Still not acceptable. "Men shouldn't be allowed to use that word," she said. Women really don't like that one.
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
JEje, nice MOC; Spanish have a bounch more of words of this kind. Just specifying :). WAtch out my MOC's.
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
priceless. one of the funniest and definitely the most risque MOC on the web. good work.
 I like it 
  July 27, 2008
Im blown away to the point where I know not what to say. I agree with you on everything... firetruck yeah (the MOC censor prevents me from using the proper term)
 I like it 
  July 26, 2008
Since I commented a lot on the other two taboo MOCs, I guess I should comment here, too. I don’t have much to say, though, because I pretty much agree with what you said. Personally, I try to use profanity as little as possible, so that when I do, it has a greater effect on people who know me. As for the Lego, the lettering and stuff is great. By the way, you are awesome for quoting Carlin. He was one of my favorite comedians.
 I like it 
  July 26, 2008
...
 
By Alex Eylar
Add to my favorite builders

61
people like this. See who.

4,944 visitors
29 comments
Added July 26, 2008
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Seven Dirty Words


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