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Minifig Scaled Light Helicopters with Working Rotor Controls and Shooting Weapons
OH-6 Cayuse and MD500 Defender with 4 channel rotor controls, shooting BGM-71 TOW missiles and 20mm Autocannon in scale 1:38
About this creation
*Visit my Lego helicopters blog also
**See model and building instructions in Lego Digital Designer (LDD) for OH-6: Here
***See model and building instructions in Lego Digital Designer (LDD) for MD500: Here


Figure 1: MD500 Defender overview

1 Introduction and inspiration

It is a common misbelief that any realistic helicopter built from Lego is a large, expensive model with several thousand parts. For example, latest TLG 9396 Technic Rescue Helicopter set contains 1044 bricks, for which it contains main rotor with collective pitch control, driven fixed pitch tail rotor, and retractable landing gear, cargo ramp and rescue winch. But there is no electric drive (its only optional, sold separately as PF set), no cyclic pitch, no yaw control, no pilot figures. Myself already designed comparable sized Bad Guys Escape Helicopter MOC far exceeding the functionality of 9396 but at the cost of 1700 bricks.

Now I will show what – in my best knowledge – nobody did yet: to put fully functional 4 channel rotor controls connected into cockpit and shooting weapons into minifig scaled light helicopter MOC consisting only around 400 bricks. The modeling challenge is enormous, as minifig scale is roughly 1:38 (one stud equals one foot). So the smallest nut we have there is 12”×12”×6”. It is like we had to build fine mechanics of helicopter rotor from bridge building materials. To make things worse, I selected two from the most compact military helicopters, OH-6 Cayuse and MD500 Defender to build:


Figure 2: MD500 Defender of Israeli Air Force

The compact egg-shaped cabin fascinated me so much since early childhood that OH-6 was my ensign in the kindergarten (behind the Iron Curtain, in a communist country!!!). I tried to build it back in the 1980s several times from Lego system elements unsuccessfully. Other MOCers in the modern world were luckier and we can see some nice MD500 MOCs on MOCPages:

-Ciamoslaw Ciamek in his minifig MD500 in 2006 solved the 5-blade rotor with clever combination of overlapping hinge parts, and created nice instrument panel even modeling the targeting periscope of TOW missiles there. However, there is no any internal mechanics.


Figure 3: Ciamoslaw Ciamek’s minifig MD500, 2006

-Kurt MOC in his minifig MD500 from 2013 solved 5-blade main rotor even more simple way and created a very stylish, proportional and SNOT design. But this model also does not contain any internal mechanics.


Figure 4: Kurt MOC’s minifig MD500, 2013

My purpose was to put working 4 channel rotor mechanics and shooting weapons into the same size as a classic Lego System “tailed box with rotating umbrella at the top”-style helicopter. I developed two MOCs with different philosophy, as I could not build good compromise in just one model:

-At OH-6 Cayuse, I tried to maximize styling and adherence to the original one, but it resulted in a rather fragile model with less playability

-At MD500 Defender, styling and historic exactness were secondary, while robust mechanics and playability had primary importance.

Let’s see them first in action:

2 Action screenshots of OH-6 Cayuse


Figure 5: OH-6 Cayuse Overview


Figure 6: OH-6 Cayuse Top panel view


Figure 7: OH-6 Cayuse Front view


Figure 8: OH-6 Cayuse Right side view with shooting BGM-71 TOW missiles


Figure 9: OH-6 Cayuse Left side view with shooting BGM-71 TOW missiles


Figure 10: OH-6 Cayuse Top view


Figure 11: OH-6 Cayuse Bottom view


Figure 12: OH-6 Cayuse Back view

3 Action screenshots of MD500 Defender


Figure 13: MD 500 Power dive


Figure 14: MD 500 Top panel view


Figure 15: MD 500 Front view


Figure 16: MD 500 Right side view with shooting BGM-71 TOW missiles


Figure 17: MD 500 Left side view with shooting 20mm Autocannon


Figure 18: MD 500 Top view


Figure 19: MD 500 Bottom view


Figure 20: MD 500 Back view

4 Technical details of OH-6/MD500

*This part is technical and for helicopter builders with at least some experience. If you do not understand how do helicopter controls work, you can find an excellent summary at: www.aviastar.org

**In the forthcoming technical description, functional parts of OH-6/MD500 are referenced by numbers which can be found on technical drawings attached

***Parts of OH-6/MD500 are color-coded by their function:
- Yellow: Manual handles of working functions
- Gray/Black: static and dynamic parts
- Orange: Pilots
- Blue: Seat of pilot
- Green: Weapons, tail rotor

As our OH-6 and MD500 MOCs have pretty similar operating principle, we publish the technical description for MD500 only, but we provide building instructions in LDD for both models.


Figure 21: Overview of mechanics
See model in LDD: Here

4.1 Main rotor


Figure 22: Main rotor

Building a small but realistic rotor was largely made possible by TLG introducing ‘Blade 16M with cross axle’ in Bionicle. Originally it is intended as an oversized sword for some exotic Bionicle fighters, but apart from some decorative details, it is quite similar to rotor blades light helicopters. Anyway TLG does not support us very well with aerodynamic SNOT rotor blades: putting a studded bar in the airflow is funny, but only until you play with Duplo. The first specialized helicopter rotor blade part was introduced in 2010, but - totally pointlessly - it has studs on the top, making all aircraft engineers really cry. Finally, in 2012 at 9396, a SNOT rotor blade was introduced, but its blade root is so awkward, that I prefer to build SNOT blades from curved fairing elements and Technic cross axles. But that solution is too bulky for a small rotor. I could not solve 5-blade working rotor until this point, so I used 4-blade design of OH-6 at MD500 also. Constructive critics are welcome.

4.2 Drivetrain


Figure 23: Drivetrain
See model in LDD: Here

Designing the drivetrain, I tried to avoid common mistake of many TLG and MOC helicopters, where main- and tail rotor are geared 1:1, while in the reality it is 1:10. Such a reduction gearing would eat up lot of space, but at least I managed put there 1:3 reduction ratio. I also tried to put there some working engine, but both the smallest TLG electric motor and even 1 cylinder plastic motor were intolerably big in minifig scale, so we have a simple rotating turboshaft mockup there. Constructive critics are welcome.

4.3 Collective blade pitch control


Figure 24: Collective blade pitch control
See model in LDD: Here

Although TLG produces specialized swashplate part (a large diameter bearing with 2 sets of ball joints and cardan-hinge in its center), it is rather bulky and it has erroneous design, as it cannot slide up/down freely on main rotor axis. Therefore the key of creating any compact working helicopter rotors from Technic is to avoid the need of conventional swashplate. This is done in the following way:

-All 4 rotor blades have individual rubber torsion springs (2) made of TLG part ‘rubber dumper 2×1×1’ forcing gently their half axises (1) to zero degree pitch. Correct pre-tension of torsion springs can be regulated by rotating (4) setting horns.

-Therefore changing blade pitch requires pushrods (5) connected to blade pitch control arms (3) instead of using ball joint-connected linkage.

-Blade pitch control pushrods can slide up/down aligned by leading slides of rotor hub, so they are NOT aligned by swashplate.

-Therefore, swashplate can be just plain plate with a hole in the middle letting through main rotor mast, and being tiltable/ liftable around that. Lower ends of blade pitch control pushrods slide on the plate’s surface.

Collective pitch control is done lifting/lowering swashplate with the help of sleeves (8) sliding on main rotor mast, when pilots pull collective control lever (9) up/down.

4.4 Cyclic blade pitch control


Figure 25: Cyclic blade pitch control
See model in LDD: Here

Cyclic blade pitch control requires tilting swashplate forward/back and left/right. Building very compact collective-cyclic mixing linkage - which decouples cyclic and collective control – was a great modeling challenge, as it requires lot of swingarms, hinges and trackrods, which eat up space dramatically in such a small scale. In fact, I had to build the streamlined, egg-shaped cabin structure in the residual space which was left around the linkage. OH-6 has even more compact swashplate and linkage than MD500 for better styling, but they work by the same principle:

-Swashplate is tilted by up/down motion of vertical track rods (8) connected with ball joints (7)

-Vertical movement of vertical track rods is converted into horizontal movement of horizontal track rods (13) with the help of two 90 degree swing arm units (10), whose pivot axises (11) move up/down together with collective control.

-Another set of 90 degree swingarms (16) connect horizontal trackrods with double yokes (18). Double yokes are synchronized with tracrkrod (17)

Horizontal cyclic track rods (13) run under the cabin floor. This destroys aesthetics if helicopters are viewed from the bottom, but saves lot of space. Even with this trick, 3 passenger seats at both OH-6 and MD500 are sacrificed for cyclic-collective mixing linkage. Constructive critics are welcome.

4.5 Yaw control


Figure 26: Tail rotor

Creating variable pitch tail rotor in such a small size, there are 2 difficulties:

-We need a small driving ring (4), which can slide on an axis easily, and pitch control rods (2) can be connected to that. This is solved with the combination of TLG parts ‘Hub 17mm with Technic snap’, ‘Tap 4.9/6.4mm’, ‘Skeleton arm No.3’.

-We need short streamlined rotor blades. At OH-6, I wanted proportionally sized tail rotor, so blades are from ‘Ice lolly’. At MD500, I wanted more functional and robust blades solved with ‘Wing, minifig buzz’.


Figure 27: Yaw control
See model in LDD: Here

Yaw control linkage is more simple than cyclic-collective mixer linkage, but it has to stretch from the nose to the tail of a helicopter, so it is also eats up lot of space. I used 3 building tricks here:

-Pseudo tail boom trick: Both OH-6 and MD500 have very thin, toque tube type tail booms. As we have no any torque tube in Technic, we need at least 3 rods for the tail: 1. Tail boom spar 2. Tail rotor transmission shaft 3.Yaw control rod. While a proportionally sized tail would allow 2×1-1×1 studs cross-section. I covered transmission shaft and yaw control rod with ‘Technic beam 2×1×1’ parts for a realistic looking tail boom, but they can rotate/ slide freely inside. The real tail boom providing structural support is a separate ’16 stud technic cross axle’ in black color, to dim its presence aesthetically.

-Forward part of yaw control rod (13) runs under cabin floor to save space.

-Half axises (14) of left/right set (11, 12) of dual yaw control pedals are also used as pivots of yoke swingarms to save space.

Designing yaw control, a nasty problem was caused by the totally stupid proportions of minifigs:

-At real helicopters, yaw control pedals are forward to the yokes and pilots torso is behind the yokes. But minifigs has as short legs compared to their torso as they were amputees, and there is no gap between their legs for the yoke. So, in the realistic control layout, their legs cannot ever reach yaw control pedals – this is how I solved OH-6. Building in Technic or Bionicle figures scale, this would not be a problem.
-At MD500, I put yaw control pedals BETWEEN yokes and pilots, so the minifig pilot can touch all controls fine, but reversed placement of yoke swingarms mean that roll control is mirrored: you have to pull the yoke right for left roll, which is crazy. Constructive critics are welcome.

4.6 20mm Autocannon

To put the final blow on the views that no helicopter with real mechanics can be built in minifig scale, I wanted there working armament. I developed shooting 20mm Autocannon based on my earlier Handbook of Building Working Guns for Bionicle Figures MOC. 20mm gun is a little bit oversized weapon for OH-6/MD500 in the reality, as its recoil would tear apart such a light craft, but this is the most compact shooting mechanism with autoloader I could create:

-Propellant force for shooting is provided by 2 steel springs from disassembled ‘Shock absorber extra hard’ TLG parts (4).

-Rotating bolt (3) is made from TLG part ‘Mini rapier’ and accelerates projectiles in 3 studs (24mm) long track.

-Barrel is made from 2 ‘Outer cable 3 studs’, which have 1.6mm inner bore

-1.5×7mm projectiles are the only non-TLG parts, as TLG does not produce reasonably small parts because of children safety, moreover ABS material is too easy for projectiles. So they are made from 1.5mm copper or aluminum wire can be found as electric wiring in any hardware store.

-Projectiles are stored in a 9-round box magazine made of ‘Toothed bar 4 studs’ and ‘Flat tile 1×4’, clipping them among the teeth of the toothed bar.

Firing cycle of 20mm Autocannon is the following:

-PHASE 1: Cocked bolt (3) is released by rotating charging handle/trigger (1) 180 degrees upward


Figure 28: Firing cycle of 20mm Autocannon, Phase 1
See model in LDD: Here

-PHASE2: Springs (4) press bolt forward. Tip of the bolt (3) locks the box magazine (10) in its actual position, and projectile is pressed from the magazine into barrel (11) and launched.

-In the meantime, bolt (3) hits block (7) of loading arm (6), and forces rotate it outward 6 degrees, against the force of torsion spring (5) made from ‘Cross axle 2 studs’.

-Therefore, magazine catch (8) placed at the end of loading arm clicks into new position of the magazine.


Figure 29: Firing cycle of 20mm Autocannon, Phase 2
See model in LDD: Here

-PHASE3: When bolt (3) is pulled back again at re-cocking, it relives pressure on loading arm block (7), then retreating tip of bolt unlocks magazine (10). So, the loading arm (6) – forced by torsion spring (5) – rotates 6 degrees inward and advances magazine (10) one position further through magazine catch (8), and the new projectile moves in line with cocked bolt.


Figure 30: Firing cycle of 20mm Autocannon, Phase 3
See model in LDD: Here

4.7 BGM-71 TOW missiles

TOW stands for Tube-Launched, Optical-Targeted, Wire-Guided Anti-Armor Missile developed by Hughes Aircraft in 1971 and continuously improved since that. Its advantages are relative cheapness and accessibility. As the missile is controlled during its flight by electric signals traveling on a double piano wire spooling down from a coil, it is relatively safe against Electronic Counter Measures (ECM). Disadvantages are limited range by wire (max. 3750m), limited speed to prevent tearing the wire (187m/sec in average) , limited armor piercing (630 mm) by 3.1 kg HE warhead, and the biggest one: launching platform has to keep target in line of sight during whole flight time of missile (max. 20secs) being an easy target itself for AA guns. Its semi-automatic optical guidance requires a gyro-stabilized periscope sight with an ocular. At helicopters it is usually placed at cockpit roof, this way at least the cabin of the helicopter can be behind some cover during targeting. Unfortunately, at real OH-6/MD500 it is placed in the instrument panel, so at OH-6 I left it in its real place (at left pilot seat of weapons operator), but at MD500 I tried to place it on cabin roof:


Figure 31: BGM-71 TOW missiles
See model in LDD: Here

In such a small size, it was not possible to create tube launched spring-driven weapon, so my TOWs have flying spigot type launch mechanism (which was used in the reality at some special types of mortar shells):

-2 ‘shock absorber’ springs (36) are held compressed by a long rod placed inside – called the spigot (34) - which flies out together with the warhead.

-Spigot is made from TLG part ‘Standard 3.2mm’, which has a 5mm diameter stop at its back. This stop could still slide through inside springs, but held back by a trigger (35) made from ’Stick with holder’

-When the trigger is pulled back, it breaks off, releasing the spigot, which flies out together with the warhead and springs.

4.8 Instruments and avionics



Figure 32: Cockpit view
See model in LDD: Here

TLG manufactures specialized cockpit windscreen part (‘Cockpit 4×4×4’) for light helicopters, which is 4 studs wide and were used in earlier OH-6/MD500 MOCs also. However it was very clear for me that dual controls cannot fit in 4 studs wide space, they need at least 5-6 studs. Therefore I used ‘Dome 48mm with combi hinge’ as windscreen, and frames of that made from bent ‘Outer cables’. One positive side effect of that I could place realistic sized, T-shaped instrument panel there. Another was that I could fix the rotating IR-camera dome to the middle frame, just like in real MD500. I tried 2 studs diameter transparent dome on my OH-6 and 1.5 studs diameter on MD500. The correct size is somewhere between them.

5 Dimensions of OH-6/MD500

It’s not very easy to give correct real sizes and proportions for my MOCs. The “standard” scale of minifigs (based on their entire height) is 1:38 (1 stud = 1 foot). In this point of view, my MOCs are largely oversized. But as minifigs are gravely disproportional, and their torso and head is more close to scale 1:25..1:30. By this scale my MOCs have basically correct sizes:

OH-6:

Height: 13.50 studs / 108.00 mm / 4.25 in, Real size: 2.70 m / 8 ft 10.24 in
Main rotor diameter: 43.00 studs / 344.00 mm / 13.54 in, Real size: 8.60 m / 28 ft 2.36 in
Rotor disc area: 1452.20 sqstuds / 929.41 sqcm / 144.06 sqinch, Real size: 58.09 sqm / 624.43 sqfeet
Tail rotor diameter: 5.00 studs / 40.00 mm / 1.57 in, Real size: 1.00 m / 3 ft 3.35 in
Distance between main rotor mast and tail rotor axis: 20.50 studs / 164.00 mm / 6.46 in, Real size: 4.10 m / 13 ft 5.31 in

MD500:

Height: 12.00 studs / 96.00 mm / 3.78 in, Real size: 2.40 m / 7 ft 10.43 in
Main rotor diameter: 43.00 studs / 344.00 mm / 13.54 in, Real size: 8.60 m / 28 ft 2.36 in
Rotor disc area: 1452.20 sqstuds / 929.41 sqcm / 144.06 sqinch, Real size: 58.09 sqm / 624.43 sqfeet
Tail rotor diameter: 7.00 studs / 56.00 mm / 2.20 in, Real size: 1.40 m / 4 ft 7.09 in
Distance between main rotor mast and tail rotor axis: 16.00 studs / 128.00 mm / 5.04 in, Real size: 3.20 m / 10 ft 5.91 in

6 Unsolved issues

-I could not solve 5-blade working main rotor of MD500, but will think about possible rotor hub solutions.

-No engine (electric or plastic piston) can fit in such a small size, not talking about the batteries, maybe I could build better detailed mockup for turboshafts.

-Back seats are sacrificed for cyclic-collective mixing linkage. With OH-6’s more compact, 3 stud wide linkage, we still need 8-9 studs wide cabin to sit passengers flanking the linkage unit.

-Cyclic and yaw control rods placed beneath the cabin floor to save space destroy aesthetics, when the helicopter is seen from the bottom. Larger helicopters (e.g. UH-1) control rods can be placed above the cabin roof, where they really are.

-Minifig pilots require yaw control pedals placed behind yokes to reach them with their legs, but this mirrors roll control. I could correct this, but I do not intend to build any other model anymore in minifig scale, it was enough from that.



Building instructions
Download building instructions (LEGO Digital Designer)

Comments

 I made it 
  August 6, 2014
Quoting Kurt's MOCs An incredible model. I am amazed that this is built at minifig scale and fully functional. Absolutely first rate! Excellent work and thanks for the reference. I'm honoured!
Thanks. Currently I am designing a working 5-blade rotor, based on your rotor hub idea. It will be published soon.
 I like it 
  August 6, 2014
An incredible model. I am amazed that this is built at minifig scale and fully functional. Absolutely first rate! Excellent work and thanks for the reference. I'm honoured!
 I made it 
  August 5, 2014
Quoting Nick Barrett Some incredible problem solving here; your posts never fail to inform and inspire. Brilliant work.
Thanks. Some more incredible problem solving coming soon...
 I like it 
  August 4, 2014
Some incredible problem solving here; your posts never fail to inform and inspire. Brilliant work.
 I made it 
  August 1, 2014
Quoting Henrik Jensen I understand and accept that the technic beam can be tilted on the main rotor crossaxle. What I think is wrong, is that the swashplate needs some kind of retainer opposite the vertical cyclic control rods. When the vertical cyclic control rods are pushed up, all that counteracts the swasplate from moving upward now, is the rotor torsion springs and therefore it will affect the rotor collectively. And i think the OH6 has the same problem, even though you for some reason, has mounted two [1x1 round plate with ball] under the swashplate, opposite the cyclic control rods. For the yawcontrol I see that the OH6, has a more flexible linkage, but still not fully articulated. I hope you understand what I mean, it´s very difficult to explain precisely. Both models look great and I admire your ability to pack all that control gear in such limited Space.
Dear Henrik, I hope I am capturing correctly what you are telling. But as you exactly wrote, the force of torsion springs will prevent the swashplate to lift collectively for cyclic input. Try to imagine the following: you have a leveled square. You try to lift it by its two neighbored corners, with the help of very flexible ball joints. In the meantime springs push downward the CENTER of the square. It will tilt because of the asymmetry of forces, because you lift by 2 corners, while springs push down the center. Torsion springs are adjustable to get this asymmetry correctly. Is it clear now? For the yaw control: rear yaw control swingarm moves only 0..+20 degrees left-right to move the driving ring on tail rotor axis, so we do not need there very articulated joint.
  July 31, 2014
I understand and accept that the technic beam can be tilted on the main rotor crossaxle. What I think is wrong, is that the swashplate needs some kind of retainer opposite the vertical cyclic control rods. When the vertical cyclic control rods are pushed up, all that counteracts the swasplate from moving upward now, is the rotor torsion springs and therefore it will affect the rotor collectively. And i think the OH6 has the same problem, even though you for some reason, has mounted two [1x1 round plate with ball] under the swashplate, opposite the cyclic control rods. For the yawcontrol I see that the OH6, has a more flexible linkage, but still not fully articulated. I hope you understand what I mean, it´s very difficult to explain precisely. Both models look great and I admire your ability to pack all that control gear in such limited Space.
 I made it 
  July 31, 2014
Quoting Centurion Cone It's a gun building contest! and you're really good at building guns!
I haven't participated any contest yet, if you can send the link where to join, that would be great.
 I like it 
  July 30, 2014
It's a gun building contest! and you're really good at building guns!
 I made it 
  July 30, 2014
Quoting Henrik Jensen A fantastic amount of work you´ve put into creation of this model. And it looks really convincing with all the sub drawings and explanations, however, it does not work. 1. The problem is the swashplate is not seated correctly, and just pushes up and Down, instead of tilting, when subjected to cyclic motion. 2 Yaw control, pushrod 7 lacks a joint with the 90deg. swing arm 6, leaving the joint stiff. It has been very interesting to study the details in your plans, and do correct me, I may be wrong. Brilliant Work!
Dear Henrik, it is good to know that someone really checks out the detailed plans with critical point of view, not just simply believes what I am telling. My answers: Consider that Lego parts have some tolerances: if you plug a cross axle in a rounded hole on a 4mm thick technic plate, the plate can be tilted relative to the cross axle at least plus/minus 7 degrees without jamming that. So: 1. Swashplate sits on a cross of 4×1 technic plates pulled on main rotor mast, so it can be tilted. It form roughly a 5×5 square, where collective sleeve pushes it upward in the middle against the force of a torsion springs, while cyclic trackrods can move up/down two of its neighbored corners, so it will be tilted by cyclic input. Its not the best solution as tilting point is under the swashplate surface, but no sliding cardan hinge can fit in such a small space. (If I had drill a 10.2mm diameter bionicle ball to slide it easily on main rotor mast, it could be solved, placing in the middle of swashplate, but it is illegal movement). Check out my OH-6 model in LDD, I used there a more compact swashplate, with better geometry, however that is more fragile: swashplate sits there around a main rotor mast made of part 3.2mm shaft, and tilts on part "Lord of the rings" ring, tilting point being more close to swashplate surface. 2. Your second critics is more rightful, because of the lack of space, there is no correct hinge at the rear end of yaw control pushrod, I used again the loose fitting principle to form a hinge with limited movement. If you check out my OH-6 model in LDD, you can se that this is corrected there, putting there more flexible hinge solution.
 I like it 
  July 29, 2014
A fantastic amount of work you´ve put into creation of this model. And it looks really convincing with all the sub drawings and explanations, however, it does not work. 1. The problem is the swashplate is not seated correctly, and just pushes up and Down, instead of tilting, when subjected to cyclic motion. 2 Yaw control, pushrod 7 lacks a joint with the 90deg. swing arm 6, leaving the joint stiff. It has been very interesting to study the details in your plans, and do correct me, I may be wrong. Brilliant Work!
 I made it 
  July 29, 2014
Quoting Centurion Cone yet again another masterful build! great use of the buzz lightyear wings! and do you want to join my contest?
Thanks. What kind of contest it is?
 I made it 
  July 29, 2014
Quoting Dr. Monster Wow. The level of detail and functionality that you have worked into a model of that scale is truly impressive. Killer MOC.
Thanks.
 I like it 
  July 29, 2014
yet again another masterful build! great use of the buzz lightyear wings! and do you want to join my contest?
 I like it 
  July 29, 2014
Wow. The level of detail and functionality that you have worked into a model of that scale is truly impressive. Killer MOC.
 I made it 
  July 29, 2014
Quoting Matt Bace Superb work once again. You are the master of LEGO helicopter design -- they should consult with you before releasing another Technic helicopter set. :-)
Thanks. Maybe I should give up my university carreer and apply for a Lego designer job... No, bad idea. I'dont like when bosses tell what can be designed and what cannot.
 I made it 
  July 29, 2014
Quoting Florida Shoooter Excellent work, as always. :) The working functions are amazing. Well done in every aspect.
Thanks.
 I like it 
  July 29, 2014
Superb work once again. You are the master of LEGO helicopter design -- they should consult with you before releasing another Technic helicopter set. :-)
 I like it 
  July 29, 2014
Excellent work, as always. :) The working functions are amazing. Well done in every aspect.
 
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