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McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo
Here is my LDD model of the McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo. It is built to minifig scale. I grew up living next to an airbase and saw (mostly heard actually!) the Voodoo flying over my house. As a kid, I always tried to build a decent Lego version of the Voodoo. I hope Iíve made some progress! I would love to hear your comments. Enjoy! You can also see larger pictures on my flickr account: https://www.flickr.com/photos/118702264@N05/sets/72157644887624796/. You can find html building instructions for sale (at a modest price) on my Etsy site: www.etsy.com/ca/shop/KurtsMOCs.
About this creation

The McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo was an all-weather interceptor operated by the RCAF and Canadian Forces from 1961 to 1984.


The CF-101 served as Canadaís primary means of air defence and stationed at Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) at Canadian airbases.


The RCAF required an interceptor aircraft to counter the Soviet bomber threat. The Avro CF-105 Arrow was designed for this role but after the programís cancellation in 1959, Canada purchased 132 F-101B Voodoo interceptors in two batches of 66 from the USAF in 1961. On my model, you can see that the landing gear is fully retractable and the flaps, ailerons, and airbrakes are fully articulating.


The CF-101 is essentially a McDonnell F-101B, which in turn differed from the F-101A in several areas. The cockpit was enlarged to carry a crew of two, the fuselage was redesigned to accommodate the Hughes MG-13 fire control radar, and employed the Semi-Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) system that allowed ground controllers to steer the aircraft towards its target by making adjustments through the aircraftís autopilot. Part of the Century Series group of supersonic fighters, the Voodoo was the first USAF aircraft capable of exceeding 1,000 mph in level flight.


The CF-101 used the more powerful Pratt & Whitney J57-P-55 engines with longer afterburners, and hence the longer engine extension past the fuselage. Each engine put out 16,900 lbf in full afterburner. This gave the CF-101 had a maximum speed of Mach 1.7, a range of 1,530 miles, and a service ceiling of 58,400 ft.


The CF-101 was armed with two AIM-4D Falcon missiles, which it carried in recessed pockets on the fuselage. The Voodoo was also capable of carrying two AIR-2A Genie unguided nuclear rockets, each with a 1.5 kt W25 warhead. These unguided nuclear rockets would be launched into the area of a bomber formation and detonate. The lethal blast radius of the Genie was about 300m so accuracy was not a high priority. Here, you can see my CF-101 armed with two AIM-4Ds.


Canada had not fully resolved the issue of bringing nuclear weapons into the country by the time the CF-101 was deployed. By 1963, the AIR-2A Genie rockets were kept in the custody of the USAF on Canadian Forces Bases and would only be released to Canada for actual use through the NORAD agreement.


The CF-101 served with No. 409 Squadron RCAF at CFB Comox, No. 410 Squadron RCAF at CFB Uplands, No. 414 Squadron RCAF at CFB North Bay, No. 416 Squadron RCAF at CFB Chatham, and No. 425 Squadron RCAF at CFB Bagotville.


Defence cuts in 1964 eliminated 410 and 414 Squadrons. However, 414 Squadron was reformed in 1972 as an electronic warfare squadron and flew the EF-101B ďElectric Voodoo,Ē a unique, all-black F-101B with the electronic jamming suite from an EB-57E Canberra.


Between 1970 and 1972, Canadian Forces (The RCAF merged with the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Army in 1968 as part of the unification of the Canadian Forces) traded in its remaining 56 aircraft back to the USAF for 66 replacements. These new aircraft were actually older aircraft whose airframes had lower flight hours.


As part of Canadaís NORAD commitment, the RCAF always had two CF-101s on ďfive minuteĒ alert, meaning the aircraft would be in the air and en route to intercept unknown aircraft within five minutes.


In one instance, aircraft from 416 Squadron were able to get airborne in 57 seconds after receiving the alert.


Most NORAD interceptions dealt with airliners flying off course however, Squadrons 416 and 425 often intercepted Soviet Tu-95 Bear bombers off the Atlantic coast. Here, my venerable Tu-95 gets intercepted (once again) by two Voodoos.


Returning from intercept! Despite all of its intercept encounters, the CF-101 never fired its weapons in anger. Note the spotlight mounted on the fuselage below the navigatorís cockpit. It was used to illuminate unidentified aircraft at night.


Here is a close up of the cockpit. The canopy is fully articulating.


In 1980, Canada selected the CF-18 Hornet to replace the CF-101 Voodoo. By 1984, the last Voodoo squadron stood down and the last nuclear weapons in Canada were returned to the United States.


I would like to acknowledge Justin Davies and Mad Physicist for their inspirational and influential work. I hope you donít mind me borrowing some of your pioneering building techniques for my model! Thanks to Wikipedia for the information and specifications.



Comments

 I made it 
  August 13, 2014
Quoting legoboyvdlp R Ah well. That's OK. None of the really great models have files.
Sorry! Stay tuned though, you never know what might happen!
  June 14, 2014
Ah well. That's OK. None of the really great models have files.
 I made it 
  June 14, 2014
Quoting legoboyvdlp R I love this plane. Can I have the file? Thanks.
Thanks for your comments. Unfortunately, I don't give away my files.
 I made it 
  June 14, 2014
Quoting JT Robertson Saw this on Flickr and had to come give it a like over here! Very well done. I don't think I've yet seen a Voodoo done in Lego, and you nailed it out of the park with yours! I've never really put much thought into the voodoo (I had heard of it, but never given it any attention), but it is one noce looking jet. Excellent job!
Thanks for your comments. The Voodoo isn't very well known but in Canada it's a recognizable airplane. I'm glad you like it!
 I like it 
  June 12, 2014
I love this plane. Can I have the file? Thanks.
 I like it 
  June 10, 2014
Saw this on Flickr and had to come give it a like over here! Very well done. I don't think I've yet seen a Voodoo done in Lego, and you nailed it out of the park with yours! I've never really put much thought into the voodoo (I had heard of it, but never given it any attention), but it is one noce looking jet. Excellent job!
 I made it 
  June 3, 2014
Quoting Murray B It is clearly a model of a curvaceous Voodoo done with rectangular blocks. Amazing work. One thing though the data given is mostly correct but the maximum theoretical combat range of the interceptor with full weapons load was 1820 nm which works out to be nearly 2100 statute miles. In operational use the limit was closer to 2000 statute miles. The long range of the Voodoo was a great benefit when patrolling Canada's large airspace.
Thanks for the comments Murray and for the clarification of the combat range. Are the numbers you quoted specifically for the CF-101?
 I like it 
  June 2, 2014
It is clearly a model of a curvaceous Voodoo done with rectangular blocks. Amazing work. One thing though the data given is mostly correct but the maximum theoretical combat range of the interceptor with full weapons load was 1820 nm which works out to be nearly 2100 statute miles. In operational use the limit was closer to 2000 statute miles. The long range of the Voodoo was a great benefit when patrolling Canada's large airspace.
 I made it 
  June 2, 2014
Quoting Lego 4 Life Very cool!
Thanks for the comments!
 I like it 
  June 2, 2014
Very cool!
 I made it 
  June 1, 2014
Quoting Dr. Monster Great job on a tricky jet. Impressive.
Thanks for the comments Dr.!
 I like it 
  June 1, 2014
Great job on a tricky jet. Impressive.
 I made it 
  June 1, 2014
Quoting adam thelegofan rutland amazing!:D
Thanks for your comments Adam!
 I like it 
  June 1, 2014
amazing!:D
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting Doctor Doomster Wonderful design! I like the design of the cockpit, a canopy, a missiles and everything!
Thanks for your comments and I'm glad you like the model.
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Wonderful design! I like the design of the cockpit, a canopy, a missiles and everything!
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting Kevin Bennett Beautiful, I love the design of the nose. They are in my opinion, the hardest part of a jet fighter to get right, and you have done this well.....
Thanks for the comments Kevin. I agree with you: the nose is the most difficult part of an aircraft to build and it is, in many ways, an airplane's defining feature. I went through several iterations on the Voodoo until I found a solution that worked with the rest of the design. Its always a challenge!
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Beautiful, I love the design of the nose. They are in my opinion, the hardest part of a jet fighter to get right, and you have done this well.....
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting Cam Mac When I was little, my dad would always tell me about how he wanted to be a Voodoo pilot when he was growing up. It's super cool to finally see a Voodoo in LEGO, specifically a Canadian one! Looks awesome, and it seems like you got every detail!
Great story! The Voodoo always looked sleek and elegant but sounded like a real brute. My fascination with military aircraft began with the Voodoo and I'm glad to hear someone else appreciated it as well.
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
When I was little, my dad would always tell me about how he wanted to be a Voodoo pilot when he was growing up. It's super cool to finally see a Voodoo in LEGO, specifically a Canadian one! Looks awesome, and it seems like you got every detail!
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting Matt Bace Great job! The Voodoo is definitely an aircraft that we don't often see in LEGO. I really like how you shaped the engine inlets.
Thanks Matt. I agree that there are not a lot of Voodoos made in Lego. I don't recall seeing any during my initial research. I guess its not popular, quirky, or exotic enough to garner much interest.
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting clayton Marchetti Excellent work! I like the scale you built it in. Awesome
Thanks Clayton. Building in minifig scale is a bit restrictive but I enjoy the challenge.
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting Joshua O'Rourke Wow - excellent work!
Thanks Joshua! I appreciate your interest in my work.
 I made it 
  May 31, 2014
Quoting David Roberts Instantly recognisable: nice work!
Thanks for the comments David. The overall profile was a bit tricky to figure out.
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Great job! The Voodoo is definitely an aircraft that we don't often see in LEGO. I really like how you shaped the engine inlets.
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Excellent work! I like the scale you built it in. Awesome
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Wow - excellent work!
 I like it 
  May 31, 2014
Instantly recognisable: nice work!
 
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