MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Cierva C-3a, C-3b, C-5
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
Cierva C-3a, C-3b, C-5
A collection of three famous Iberian aircraft, the C-3a, the C-3b, and the C-5.
About this creation
((All story elements are my own touch on the story of DC3. Spain and Portugal had sided with Europe in the war))

The Cierva C-3a series of planes were original shipment of Cierva C-3's. They were soon found to be unmatched by other fighters and mostly all of them were soon converted into light attack aircraft. They could carry up to 1,500 pounds of armament in the form of bombs or a torpedo. They were used excessively after being found that they were better suited for attack than fighting. They were used in the famous attack on the USS Northridge in 1919, where two Spanish C-3's armed with Torpedos sunk the Battleship in the Battle Of The Bay Of Biscay.






The design of the C-3 had been altered since the C-3a, and such the C-3b was born. The C-3b was better suited to fighting against enemy aircraft, featuring a mroe powerful engine and changed fuselage. The back turret had been removed freeing up space and weight in the back of the aircraft. The C-3b was used extensively in the defense of the Iberian Republic against the incoming American planes. All together, the C-3b has been credited with over 500 confirmed kills of enemy aircraft.






The Cierva C-5 was a direct successor to the Cierva C-3 series. It featured new, advanced features such as a bubble canopy and gull wings. The C-5 was delivered too late to see action in the first war, but later saw use over Portugal in the Iberian Civil War. Portugese nationalists were concerned over border disputes along the border, along with the control of certain islands in the Atlantic. Portugal attacked, and Spain pushed back into Portugal. The War ended with the Election of 1938, where the Spanish people, along with small groups of Portugese, voted to the end the war, and merge the two countries into the Iberian Republic.






Building instructions
Download building instructions (LEGO Digital Designer)

Comments

  August 23, 2014
So compact yet detailed, a really slick looking fighter. Well done!
 I like it 
  August 22, 2014
Mr. Small. I don't think it is totally crazy to say that these little prop jobs will suffer if they fight jets... but aircraft have LOTS of uses. As you mentioned, training is important. But don't forget other uses like MEDIVAC, HIGH PRIOITY CARGO DELIVERY (usually medical supplies or sensitive data), VIP transport, low threat recon (like checking within your own territories) and dont forget that in the early phases of D&C4, we are annexing territories with no resistance! So this stuff is FINE! ATTACK!
 I like it 
  August 21, 2014
O. K.! I'll be right on it! (*opens .lxf file*) And again, nice work. Incredible detail on those planes!
 I made it 
  August 21, 2014
Quoting Roy Bailey Nice! Is it alright that I use these to help me make an F4U, F1M and biplane fighter? (all WW1-WW2 era.) (And yes, I will note that these were used to help.)
Sure! Just link back to the creation.
 I like it 
  August 21, 2014
Nice! Is it alright that I use these to help me make an F4U, F1M and biplane fighter? (all WW1-WW2 era.) (And yes, I will note that these were used to help.)
 I like it 
  January 25, 2014
Cool! Nice selection of older aircrafts :-)
  January 2, 2014
wow! This is awesome!
 I like it 
  January 2, 2014
Fantastic collection of aircraft! I really like the look of the C-5, small but very deadly. Great work!
 I made it 
  January 2, 2014
Quoting TheWolfBrigade 01 Fancy and artistic but seriously, these are just flying skeets compared to revolutionary peculator shaped jet aircraft. Your gonna get ripped to shreds. BTW I love the C-5 plane.
Yeah, I know. I built these in my free time, but I only plan to use the C-5 for trainer/ground attack roles. I already have some 50's era jets that I can use, and I plan to buy some from others.
 I like it 
  January 1, 2014
Fancy and artistic but seriously, these are just flying skeets compared to revolutionary peculator shaped jet aircraft. Your gonna get ripped to shreds. BTW I love the C-5 plane.
 I made it 
  January 1, 2014
Quoting Matthew McCall Chibi is a japanese term that means something along the lines of a combination of small, deformed, and cute. Basically, what I'm trying to say is that these aircraft seem smaller than their historical counterparts.
Hmmm... i guess youre right. The biplanes look correctly proportioned to me, but i can see how the gull wing looks a little small. The CF-92 looks very small though.
  January 1, 2014
Chibi is a japanese term that means something along the lines of a combination of small, deformed, and cute. Basically, what I'm trying to say is that these aircraft seem smaller than their historical counterparts.
 I like it 
  January 1, 2014
I definitivly love the C5! could you add more pictures?
 I made it 
  January 1, 2014
Quoting Matthew McCall These chibi fighters are neat if a bit small. Are you actually planning to use them? These are pretty much utterally obsolete by the 50's.
Chibi fighters? And I might plan on using the gull-wing a little bit. Obviously not the biplanes though. The gull-wing will mostly be a trainer/light-attack aircraft.
 I like it 
  January 1, 2014
These chibi fighters are neat if a bit small. Are you actually planning to use them? These are pretty much utterally obsolete by the 50's.
  January 1, 2014
LOVE the gullwings! Great set of airplanes!
 
By Colin Small
Add to my favorite builders

12
people like this. See who.

784 visitors
16 comments
Added December 31, 2013
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Cierva C-3a, C-3b, C-5


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2014 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use