MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop 1939 American LaFrance 500 Series Pumper
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
1939 American LaFrance 500 Series Pumper
This is a 1939 American LaFrance 500 Series Pumper. It has a 1000 gpm pump with a three man closed cab and an overhead ladder rack. It is powered by the famous American LaFrance V-12 engine.
About this creation
The Great Depression took a tremendous toll on fire apparatus manufacturers. No manufacturer was immune from the Depression. In 1926 American LaFrance was the leading manufacturer of fire apparatus with sales of $5.5 million ($68 million in 2011 dollars). By 1934 these dropped by 89 percent to only $592,000 ($10 million in 2011 dollars).




Despite the Depression, the 1930s were a decade of incredible innovation in fire apparatus. There were some very visible changes in fire apparatus. Factory installed windshields became standard. Left hand steering became more prevalent and eventually standard. Enclosed cabs and sedan style cabs were becoming common. Shaft drives now were used instead of chain drives.




American fire apparatus during the first half of the 20th Century reflected trends in American design. One of the more notable trends was the Art Deco movement. It was characterized by sleek lines and smooth curves. The Art Deco style also was reflected in the architecture of many of the firehouses built during this period.




The most quintessential Art Deco fire engine is the American LaFrance 500 Series. It was designed American LaFrance designer John Grybos. The 500 Series had large rounded fenders and rounded body with its bell hidden behind its large front grill. On 500 Series pumpers the ground ladders and hard suction hoses stored out of view inside the body. Some, like this one, had an overhead ladder rack. The American LaFrance 600 Series was an upgraded version of the 500 Series introduced in 1941. Upgrades included improved visibility and various mechanical and cosmetic changes. A total of 1583 units of the 500 and 600 Series were built between 1938 and 1946. BFD552@gmail.com.






Comments

 I like it 
  November 21, 2013
your work on these trucks is amazing,attention to detail etc,i am currently building the FORD ISLAND CONTROL TOWER and struggling to build the 1930s/1940s style fire/wrecker trucks (sitting in front as you will see on an old black/white pic on google)a challenge for you
 I like it 
  August 11, 2012
Very nicely built. You have made careful selection of your parts and achieved the look of the real vehicle. Great Work :-)
 I like it 
  March 28, 2012
superb build >
 I made it 
  November 26, 2011
Quoting Scott Bertaut An excellent truck, sure its out dated, but looks have to count for something! I was recently at a fire museum up in New York, this looks very accurate to the real thing. Ever consider trying to make an opening hood and show us that V-12?
Which Museum? I this the truck at the bottom of this page? http://www.fasnyfiremuseum.com/fireapparatus.php
 I like it 
  November 25, 2011
An excellent truck, sure its out dated, but looks have to count for something! I was recently at a fire museum up in New York, this looks very accurate to the real thing. Ever consider trying to make an opening hood and show us that V-12?
Lego Fire Museum Inc.
 I like it 
White Knight
  November 24, 2011
a classic beauty !>....well done
 I like it 
  November 24, 2011
very sleek!
 I made it 
  November 24, 2011
Quoting Austin M Beuatiful Truck. Didn't American LaFrances have a ladder on the Ofiicers side?
Some trucks did. The 700 Series (1947-1956)had the pump on the officer's side and the ladder was on the driver's side. The 800 Series and subsequent series of trucks had the pump on the driver's side and ladder on the officer's side. Prior to WWII ground ladder, hard suction and pump placement was not completely stadardized. However, by the late 30s most pumpers were set up with the ground ladders and hard suction set up as we know them now. With the 500 Series the big departure from previous trucks designs was the hard suction hoses and ladders being built into the body and hidden. Some 500 Series pumpers had an overhead ladder rack; these were enclosed. Otherwise the ladder was enclosed in the body. Overhead ladder racks continued to be used on some 700 Series pumpers and all but disappeared by the late 1950's.
 I like it 
  November 24, 2011
This is very smooth. Fantastic Fire Engine :)
  November 24, 2011
What a beautiful engine, well done!
Lego Fire Museum Inc.
 I like it 
Austin M
  November 23, 2011
Beuatiful Truck. Didn't American LaFrances have a ladder on the Ofiicers side?
 I like it 
  November 23, 2011
Great job, nice clean lines and really authentic appearance.
 I made it 
  November 23, 2011
Quoting Zak Overmyer Great job on this, LFM. Always liked these rigs. Any particular reason for not showing the rear of trucks in your pictures?
Good question. I did for the Sedan Cab Seagrave, but otherwise I haven't. On Brickshelf I have used all different angles. Here on MOC Pages I pretty much have limited most posts to 4 shots. I probably should think about adding rear 3/4 shoots because I build details into the back ends too.
 I like it 
  November 23, 2011
Love the sleek design of the tis rig LFM. A very good job! -MM
 I like it 
  November 23, 2011
Great job on this, LFM. Always liked these rigs. Any particular reason for not showing the rear of trucks in your pictures?
 
By Lego Fire Museum Inc.
Add to my favorite builders

19
people like this. See who.

3,178 visitors
15 comments
Added November 23, 2011
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop 1939 American LaFrance 500 Series Pumper


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2014 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use