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NAIA Aeva -- Preview
Take a sneak peek at the NAIA Aeva, a yet-to-be-released high-capacity minifigure commerical airliner!
About this creation

Ladies and Gentlemen – whether you are airliner enthusiasts or everyday travelers looking for a comfortable flight – I am assured you will give a warm welcome to the yet-to-be-released NAIA Aeva, a state-of-the-art high-capacity minifigure airliner.



BILL YEAR:
“Hello world! My name is Bill Year and I am the national representative for the Islandasia Commercial Aviation Society. I am here today with a good friend of mine, Steve Swift, the CEO of the National Aerospace Intelligence Agency of Islandasia. Today we are going to talk a little bit about the latest buzz in the aviation media: an all-new and extraordinary attempt at developing a high-capacity, economical Lego airliner by NAIA! Mr. Swift, can you tell us a little bit about this remarkable enterprise?”

STEVE SWIFT:
“Being in production since 2009, this monumental endeavor by the National Aerospace Intelligence Agency of Islandasia will undoubtedly transform intercontinental air travel in surrounding areas. The NAIA Aeva is a high-capacity commercial airliner capable of carrying 75 to 100 passengers at 520 miles per hour a distance of 8,300 to 8,600 nautical miles. The Aeva project is partly sponsored by NAIA’s #1 customer and partner, BriksAir Islandasia, the national airline of the nation of Islandasia.”



BILL YEAR:
“Rumor has it that the NAIA Aeva is not just a single aircraft, but a whole family of ‘em! Could you explain?”

STEVE SWIFT:
“The NAIA Aeva family consists of three base models: the Aeva 100, 200, and 300. Each model can be configured to contain all-economy seats in a one-class configuration or economy + first class seats in a two-class configuration. The NAIA Aeva is realistically comparable to the Embraer 170-195 family in both capacity and performance.”





BILL YEAR:
“Airliner enthusiasts look forward to the aircraft’s completion and release. When do you guess that will be?”

STEVE SWIFT:
“The first NAIA Aeva, an Aeva 100, is still in the production stage and will likely not be rolled out of the factory doors until sometime in mid 2011. This is due in part to the sheer immensity of the project, a lack of resources and workers, and a dwindling budget. Nevertheless, the project is still in a green-light status and will be the focus of NAIA’s concentration until its completion. This project is too promising to be dropped. Once we get the first aircraft out, consecutive airliners should follow much more quickly.”





BILL YEAR:
“How do you expect the NAIA Aeva to impact the airliner market and commercial aviation in general?”

STEVE SWIFT:
“The NAIA Aeva, in all honesty, is expected to be ground-breaking. Never before has the nation of Islandasia been in possession of aircraft of any sort comparable to real-life airplanes. The Lego Company did a fine job with their little airliners, but compared to real-life aircraft they are no larger than private jets and are very unsuitable for big airlines. With immigration and tourism in Islandasia reaching new heights at fast rates, mass air transportation is becoming vital . . . with the NAIA Aeva, airlines will be able to instigate high-capacity and comfortable flights with more efficiency and over greater distances than ever before. When people ask me if bigger really is better, I remind them that one NAIA Aeva 100 will possess equal capacity of TEN Lego #7893 aircraft. When simple logic is applied, one will discover that operating one NAIA Aeva as opposed to ten Lego #7893 aircraft saves an enormous amount of energy, airport space and movement, and air congestion. A hundred smaller planes are prone to cause a whole lot more mayhem and waste a whole lot more energy and be a whole lot less efficient than ten high-capacity, high-performance aircraft such as the NAIA Aeva. With a variety of different customizable models, airlines can find exactly what they need just within the NAIA Aeva family. Though still very far from the standards of mammoth aircraft such as the Airbus A330 or the Boeing 777, the NAIA Aeva suffices excellently for mid-range, large-capacity air transportation. One of these days, NAIA Aeva freighters and military aircraft may very well be flying in the skies as well. The future is very promising for the Aeva’s ideal ingenuity.”



BriksAir Islandasia, the official airline of Islandasia and the primary customer/sponsor of the National Aerospance Intelligence Agency of Islandasia, has a total order of nine NAIA Aeva 100, 200, and 300 models.



NAIA AEVA STATISTICS

Aeva 100

Cruising Speed: 520 mph
Range: 8,300 nm
Takeoff Field: 2,920 studs
Landing Field: 2,310 studs
Wingspan: --
Length: --
Engines (2x): NAIA Turbine PP3a2
Classes: 1
Total Accommodation: 75
Maximum time in the air: 6.5 hours
Miles per Gallon: 41

Aeva 200 Standard

Cruising Speed: 540 mph
Range: 8,600 nm
Takeoff Field: 3,200 studs
Landing Field: 2,500 studs
Wingspan: --
Length: --
Engines (2x): NAIA Turbine PP3a3
Classes: 2
First Class Accommodation: 4 or 8
Economy Class Accommodation: 80 or 55
Total Accommodation: 84 or 63
Maximum time in the air: 6.5 hours
Miles per Gallon: 42

Aeva 200 High-Capacity

Cruising Speed: 540 mph
Range: 8,600 nm
Takeoff Field: 3,200 studs
Landing Field: 2,500 studs
Wingspan: --
Length: --
Engines (2x): NAIA Turbine PP3a3
Classes: 1
Total Accommodation: 100
Maximum time in the air: 6.5 hours
Miles per Gallon: 40

Aeva 300 Standard

Cruising Speed: 520 mph
Range: 8,500 nm
Takeoff Field: 3,300 studs
Landing Field: 2,600 studs
Wingspan: --
Length: --
Engines (2x): NAIA Turbine PP3a5
Classes: 2
First Class Accommodation: 8
Economy Class Accommodation: 80
Total Accommodation: 88
Maximum time in the air: 6.5 hours
Miles per Gallon: 40

Aeva 300 High-Capacity

Cruising Speed: 520 mph
Range: 8,500 nm
Takeoff Field: 3,300 studs
Landing Field: 2,600 studs
Wingspan: --
Length: --
Engines (2x): NAIA Turbine PP3a5
Classes: 1
Total Accommodation: 120
Maximum time in the air: 6.5 hours
Miles per Gallon: 40



Comments

  September 8, 2012
Hey I was wondering, can I add you as a partner too? My airline is called ExoticaAirways
 I like it 
  April 26, 2012
can't wait to see this finished ! looks great check out my boeing 777-200
 I like it 
  July 29, 2011
can be an ER v
 I made it 
  January 30, 2011
Quoting Jonathan Ma Hmm...impressive! Have you finished the Aeva yet?
It just so happens it's nearing completion. I have no idea when I'll get it up on MOCpages, but I appreciate your interest! Glad you like it.
 I like it 
  January 29, 2011
Hmm...impressive! Have you finished the Aeva yet?
Stephen Abbott
 I like it 
General Frank
  August 24, 2010
Do you want to be a partner of Frankish Aircraft Manufacturer F.A.M if you are interested. Director of F.A.M
 I made it 
  August 24, 2010
Quoting General Frank Do you want to be a partner of Frankish Aircraft Manufacturer F.A.M if you are interested. Director of F.A.M
Sure thing, General Frank! Thanks for asking! NAIA Islandasia is always up to expanding its network :)
 I made it 
  August 19, 2010
Quoting Emperor Ludgonious Nice start. This thing is going to be huge. I can't wait to see it finished.
Thank you, Emperor! It's good to hear from you again...
 I like it 
  August 18, 2010
Nice start. This thing is going to be huge. I can't wait to see it finished.
 I like it 
  August 15, 2010
cool
 I made it 
  August 13, 2010
Quoting Maxim Schupack If you are interested, Nova Airlines would like to become a partner of Bricksair. If so, I have started making a B737 on LDD from the drawing of this MOC (had to replace the purple by blue...and not everything that should be yellow is), and would be honored to add it to Nova's partners page if you gave me permission.
Sounds like a fine idea to me! Thanks for the suggestion; BriksAir would be honored to be a partner of Nova Airlines!
 I made it 
  August 13, 2010
Quoting Steffen Kasteleiner Dude, I´m blabbering today – sorry for that! :) Anyways, can’t wait to see how you will continue this beast! Best regards, Steffen
Yes, I referenced a lot of my entire design ideas from Calum Tsang. I originally planned on spacing out the seats by one half of a stud as well, but decided to stick with no in-between space at all to conserve jumper elements. Your observations on realistic vehicle width to minifigure height ratios are quite interesting, and in fact very similar to mine. In case you have not observed, the majority of BriksAir’s fleet is made up of 6-wide aircraft such as the Orbit, which is a comparatively similar scale-accurate replication of a Dash 8 or something along those lines. Thanks for the tips; I’ll be sure to integrate them as best as I can! I’ve already completed the interiors but have not taken the time to include them in this preview MOC. Thanks for the comments; they’re much appreciated! Can’t wait to see what you have in the workshop yourself :) Sincerely, Stephen
 I like it 
  August 12, 2010
If you are interested, Nova Airlines would like to become a partner of Bricksair. If so, I have started making a B737 on LDD from the drawing of this MOC (had to replace the purple by blue...and not everything that should be yellow is), and would be honored to add it to Nova's partners page if you gave me permission.
 I like it 
  August 12, 2010
It looks great, can't wait to see the final product. Great addition to the bricksair fleet =D
 I like it 
  August 12, 2010
When it comes to the width of Lego aircraft, I personally go by the following, round-about scale: 1. 4-5 studs: small prop aircraft such as Cessnas or the Swearingen Metroliner; jet trainers 2. 6-wide: the perfect width for typical business jets; Embrear-135; etc. 3. 7-8 studs: small narrow-body airliners (the CRJ series, Dash-8) 4. 8-wide: medium narrow-body airliners (McDonell Douglas MD-80, Douglas DC-8, ) 5. 9-wide: larger narrow-body airliners (B-737, B-757, B-707, BAe-146) 6. 10-wide: “mid-body” airliners (the Airbus A-320 series), featuring a container loading system 7. 12-wide and larger: wide-body aircraft. // Next to mini figs, those widths, I think, look realistic. It is the height ratio that matters more when we compare mini figs to models of planes, vehicles, etc. The height ratio “jumps into our vision” first – that is why I came up for myself with the above mentioned scale for Lego aircraft. The width (and so: the size) of any fictional aircraft model I build can thus be compared to real aircraft by this scale… // An extension for vehicles: 1. Trucks: 7-wide 2. Trains: 8-wide 3. Aircraft hauler: 8-10 studs // Anyways, that´s just me being nit-picky. That’s “my way”. // The aircraft I´m currently working on will be 10-wide, BTW! // Dude, I´m blabbering today – sorry for that! :) Anyways, can’t wait to see how you will continue this beast! Best regards, Steffen
 I like it 
  August 12, 2010
Hey my friend, this looks gigantic and mighty! Its planned size reminds me of my big cargo aircraft that I decided to not continue (C-3 X). Respect, Stephen! That is large - 14-wide if I saw right!? I decided to keep future models a tad smaller than that, just because I didn´t have enough of the right parts to build the C-3 X the way I wanted to... Since you´re still in the beginning phase, may I suggest applying some SNOT work on the nose cone with all those slopes you already used in that section? Cause if you´d position them on the sides rather and build the top and underside out of thin plates/tiles, your aircraft might get a "smoother" nose. And sleek nose cones really do a lot, optically speaking. BTW: IMO, the Aeva is comparable to large real aircraft such as the models you mentioned above - or at least to an Airbus A-310! The thing is: For one ankwardly proportioned mini fig, you could probaly seat 2-3 real passengers! which means: the seat numbers in your Lego models can´t really be the reference. It´s more the aircraft´s general size which counts optically. So: without having a "bad conscience", you could declare your aircraft as a wide-body model. The 100 seats of the Aeva-200 would be roughly 250-300 seats in real life planes! I have had similar conversations with Calum Tsang, who built... a very nice CRJ jet, but just not scaled for mini-figs http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/98340 ...and a diameter model of a 777, also looking a tad too large for mini figs. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/167852 In comporaison to his models, yours actually looks right as a wide-body airliner designed for minifigs! :)
 
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