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LO-PRO Positionable Suspention System
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About this creation
Whilst MOCpaging today, I was inspired by Brick Freak to follow his lead and create a section where I can outline some of the more complicated/interesting techniques I use in my builds. This first is one I'm particularly proud of, the Low-Profile Positionable Suspension System...or just LO-PRO for short.

I find the LO-PRO so appealing because it satisfies the three concerns that I always have when designing an off-road vehicle suspension: (1) The system is somewhat functional (or in this case, at least, "positionable), (2) The system provides adequate ground-clearance whilst maintaining a low-profile and "safe" ride height, and (3) The system does not require much interior space.

I'll be demonstrating this technique on the Chopsaw, because, due to its small size, it will be easy to photograph, and also because, let's face it, it's just such a cute little guy.

First off, you start with a basic T-frame. I like to make the latitudinal portion (The bley plate) have the same width that I want the overall body to have. This will facilitate the development of fenders for your wheels. in this case, I wanted Chopsaw to be no more than six upright studes wide, so the main latitudinal plate is 4x6 studs.



This non-traditional axle setup is the cornerstone of this suspension method. The bley technic connector on the end holding the technic pin is your independent axle. You then use a technic cross-axle for your strut (this is where it is quite easy to lengthen the wheelbase of your vehicle; if you want a longer truck, put in longer cross-axles). You slide the cross axle into the technic connector, and attach to the opposite end of said axle a technic hinge piece, designated by LEGO as a "FRIC/STUMP W. CROSS HOLE." You attach this to a "PLATE 1X2 W. FORK/VERTICLE/END" and your axle assembly is complete.



Place your axle assemblies on your T-frame in this configuration:



Add some mean muddin' tires!



You start your fenders with inverted roof bricks. Notice in the photo how it is possible to begin developing your interior right away, using 1x1 plates to fill in gaps above the suspension.



And...TA-DA! The beauty of the LO-PRO is revealed - Plenty of ground-clearance, minimal top-heavyness, and a low interior profile!



Don't forget, the system is very flexible when it comes to size. You might notice this is the exact same suspension method I am using in the "Raptor" - I just used longer cross-axles and a larger T-frame

I would love to see this system in use in some of your models! Please let me know if you do though, and give me some cred - not because I'm addicted to recognition, but because I probably wouldn't even notice otherwise.






Comments

 I made it 
  December 20, 2010
Quoting Tom Simon This is fantastic. Begs the question of you let your skills deteriorate so badly in your later MOCs.
I know, right? I mean the vision I had here - a very clone-esque quality. And how I thought to leave it unfinished, so as to inspire viewers to complete it with their own mind's eye. Brilliant! I've been trying to match it for a year now to no avail...
 I like it 
  December 20, 2010
This is fantastic. Begs the question of you let your skills deteriorate so badly in your later MOCs.
 I like it 
  June 25, 2010
That's a neat idea... I might have to jank it for my own uses. With credit to you if I post stuff of course.
 I like it 
  May 24, 2010
Here is a design I've used a few times: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/65651 (please forgive the shoddy build, it broke right before I took the pictures and I failed to rebuild it correctly) The area I'm suggesting is the front suspension. You should be able to get an idea of what I did based on the pics. The person who originally came up with this design (they had more detailed pics) must have deleted their profile because the links I have don't work anymore. Hope this helps! Peace ~ Packie
 I like it 
  May 5, 2010
I used a similar design for my Halo Warthog..... Really neat.
  March 4, 2010
I made this suspension system and built my own custom chopsaw out of it but this system is highly unstable.
 I like it 
  February 11, 2010
Thanks! I did a lot af research today, but I didn't want to destroy my Cougar SUV just yet to test it all out
 I made it 
  February 11, 2010
Quoting John Moore so for a total of two hours i sat around and messed with suspension stuff. Nothing i tried today worked to my expectations. I tried single axle and Independant suspension too. Back to the drawing board!
You're a true LEGO engineer!
 I like it 
  February 11, 2010
so for a total of two hours i sat around and messed with suspension stuff. Nothing i tried today worked to my expectations. I tried single axle and Independant suspension too. Back to the drawing board!
 I made it 
  February 11, 2010
Quoting 000 000 Ahh... so this is the wonder.... and here I was thinking it was rubber bands... that's pretty innovative....
thanks again. No rubber bands - although they could easily be added for realistic "springy-ness"
 I like it 
  February 11, 2010
Ahh... so this is the wonder.... and here I was thinking it was rubber bands... that's pretty innovative....
 I made it 
  February 10, 2010
Ah yes! that thing! well funny you should mention that - Brick Freak suggested I experiment with this system and some rubber bands, and so I did - however, with the "stiff" hinge joints, the rubber bands didn't seem to "pull" hard enough to make the suspension useful. Also, the rubber bands kept slipping up the vertical portion of the axle, shortening the distance between its attachment to the axle and its attachment to the vehicle frame, thus resulting in FURTHER loss of tension. ....wow. now even I'm confused. suffice to say, I'm going to be spending a lot of my brick time researching and developing suspension systems - because they're ridiculously important to this style of vehicles, as the three of us seem to realize. Obviously, I'll post anything good I come up with.
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
Yes! thats it!
  February 10, 2010
 I made it 
  February 10, 2010
Quoting John Moore meeeee toooo, although I've had over a week off because of it. Have you tried two of the pieces that look like =O attached to a rubber band on top?
ehhh?
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
meeeee toooo, although I've had over a week off because of it. Have you tried two of the pieces that look like =O attached to a rubber band on top?
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
Snow DAy for me too. :)
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
Snowfall!? Lucky-ish. In So-Cal that doesnt exist. If I have time after school today then I'll try taking and posting pics.
 I made it 
  February 10, 2010
Quoting Brick Freak Nope. In making the truck, I decided to go for a more complex system using rubber bands and technic parts.
seeing as how i have the day off of work due to massive snowfall, im taking your advice and trying out some loose joints with bands. Id def love to see your method
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
Nope. In making the truck, I decided to go for a more complex system using rubber bands and technic parts.
 I made it 
  February 10, 2010
Quoting Brick Freak So thats how ya do it. This makes me want to post the system I used on V.2 of my truck. Very creative. If you want to add a springy design aspect to it, You should experiment with rubber bands and loose joints. Those have a tendancy to work. Anyway, nice system.
you definitely should post that. It's not the same as your "easy" method right?
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
So thats how ya do it. This makes me want to post the system I used on V.2 of my truck. Very creative. If you want to add a springy design aspect to it, You should experiment with rubber bands and loose joints. Those have a tendancy to work. Anyway, nice system.
 I made it 
  February 10, 2010
Quoting Siddhart Jaipal I've never tried that before, but it's amazing. You made a simple variable low/ high suspension. Great!
yep - exactly. I just wish I could come up with a way to give it real springs.
 I like it 
  February 10, 2010
I've never tried that before, but it's amazing. You made a simple variable low/ high suspension. Great!
 
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop LO-PRO Positionable Suspention System


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