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Kelso Advice Thread: Ask Quickly...
 Group admin 

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 3:02 pm
Hey Mark sorry I can't post the link I'm on an iPod and the computer is unavailable... So could you tell me if my Wip the beauty of nature is worth finishing? I'll have to do a BL order...
Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 3:04 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)

Lol

Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 3:04 pm
Ahh man... I need to find a way to redirect my memory... When I saw your comment that was a reply to mine in the last thread I instantly knew what movie it was from.. If I right it was from that small girl lizard.. Right?
Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 4:50 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


What kind of advice do you have for setting up well lit places for taking photos? With Winter snows it's far more difficult to take photos outside, and my last couple of MOCs were dripped on. Thanks!
Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 4:54 pm
What advice do you have for this MOC? http://mocpages.com/moc.php/302224

Also, I hope you don't mind, but how about this other hardsuit I recently made?
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/302548
Permalink
| January 1, 2012, 5:06 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Arnas Scheel
Hey Mark sorry I can't post the link I'm on an iPod and the computer is unavailable... So could you tell me if my Wip the beauty of nature is worth finishing? I'll have to do a BL order...


Absolutely! Regardless of how something is coming along, I personally think it's good to try to see it through...

For starters, it's looking good - so, it's worth finishing just from the standpoint of the quality of the MOC so far. But, even if that weren't the case, pushing forward will help you to develope the habit of making a creation work (instead of giving in any time you might be struggling with something). This mindset is not just good for Lego building, or even other creative endeavors, but for everything you do.

As for the BL order, just keep in mind that although it might cost you a bit, those pieces are YOURS until the end of time, baby! So, don't just look at a BL purchase as something for an immediate MOC, but also as an investment in future creations. (And keep in mind, that if you ever decide to abandon the Lego, you can always recoup a lot of your expenses by selling your collection!)

By the way, as for the piece itself...I like the composition with the falls asymetrically placed. I think you could use more curvature at the water's edge - the grass areas are very blocky right now. The falling water is looking good, as well.

Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 8:52 am
 Group admin 
Quoting CJ Cutrone
Ahh man... I need to find a way to redirect my memory... When I saw your comment that was a reply to mine in the last thread I instantly knew what movie it was from.. If I right it was from that small girl lizard.. Right?


You got it...Ducky. Haven't seen that movie in years, but a lot of the lines from it just got stuck in my head. I seem to have a thing for being able to remember lines from movies. Of all the stupid things to be able to remember - why couldn't I be good at calculus or something. Sheesh!
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 8:54 am
 Group admin 
Quoting LukeClarenceVan The Revanchist
What kind of advice do you have for setting up well lit places for taking photos? With Winter snows it's far more difficult to take photos outside, and my last couple of MOCs were dripped on. Thanks!


I think your best bet is any light colored room with a good number of windows. Natural light is SO much better than indcandescant or flourescent lighting for accurate color. Of course, if you have a photo-editing application, you can compensate for any color problems, but the closer you get in the first place, the better. Meanwhile, keep in mind that indoor lighting can be much darker overall. So, be prepared to shoot with long exposure times. This means having a tripod, or setting your camera on something to avoid motion. If it automatically wants to switch to a flash (which cameras will often do when there's not enough light), switch off that feature, and go with a longer exposure. The flash will make your finished images too extreme in the contrasts.

The key is in finding an area where the light is reflective and not directly on the MOC. It's more even that way. But if you have a portion of the creation that's in shadow or too dark, you can use large panels of white foam core, held at close range, to reflect light on to the shaded side of a MOC. This is to even out the lighting.

So, in short, shoot for a naturally lit room with the MOC not in direct light. Use a reflective surface (like the white foam core) to compensate for any shaded areas. And if at all possible, aquire a photo-enhancing software to help the images after shooting them.


Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:05 am
Quoting Mark Kelso



Cool, thanks! I'll start checking out which room is best today.
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:08 am
Hey Mr Kelso, when I use flash on my camera the quality of the image is greatly increased. However, when I am photographing MOCs that are made of mostly white bricks I have to turn flash off otherwise the images are unidentifiable. But as I said, when flash is off the picture is slightly blurry.
What would you suggest I do to keep flash on but not have just a white photo?
Perhaps I should use a diffent coloured background? At the moment I am using a white background.

Help!
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:12 am
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Hey Mr Kelso, when I use flash on my camera the quality of the image is greatly increased. However, when I am photographing MOCs that are made of mostly white bricks I have to turn flash off otherwise the images are unidentifiable. But as I said, when flash is off the picture is slightly blurry.
What would you suggest I do to keep flash on but not have just a white photo?
Perhaps I should use a diffent coloured background? At the moment I am using a white background.

Help!


Either use a tripod, or when taking pictures of white-bricked creations, use a black background.

Thats my recommendation ;)

Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:20 am
Quoting Flare .

Either use a tripod, or when taking pictures of white-bricked creations, use a black background.

Thats my recommendation ;)

Thank you. But what should I use for the black background? Like a sheet of black card or something?
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:23 am
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Thank you. But what should I use for the black background? Like a sheet of black card or something?


I don't shoot with a black background very often, but when I do, I use a black shirt of mine, it is large enough plus it doesn't have any gaps.

Good luck!
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:30 am
white bricks tend to be quite reflective, so flash has problems. it's almost as difficult as photographing metal. Try using a more intense natural/external light source positioned behind the camera, such as standing in front of a window during the day, or directly under a spotlight or placing the moc under a desk light.

Try using a longer exposure, on older cameras this is the ISO setting, but with digital cameras you'll need to adjust the macro settings.

check the light settings on the camera, some have the option to adjust for low light and dusk settings which don't require flash.

what type of camera are you using?

Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:32 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Absolutely! Regardless of how something is coming along, I personally think it's good to try to see it through...

For starters, it's looking good - so, it's worth finishing just from the standpoint of the quality of the MOC so far. But, even if that weren't the case, pushing forward will help you to develope the habit of making a creation work (instead of giving in any time you might be struggling with something). This mindset is not just good for Lego building, or even other creative endeavors, but for everything you do.

As for the BL order, just keep in mind that although it might cost you a bit, those pieces are YOURS until the end of time, baby! So, don't just look at a BL purchase as something for an immediate MOC, but also as an investment in future creations. (And keep in mind, that if you ever decide to abandon the Lego, you can always recoup a lot of your expenses by selling your collection!)

By the way, as for the piece itself...I like the composition with the falls asymetrically placed. I think you could use more curvature at the water's edge - the grass areas are very blocky right now. The falling water is looking good, as well.

Thanks! I've made the grassy area a LITTLE less blocky and added foam to the bottom of the waterfall but i can't add curvature at the moment... I took a break from this MOC and made a different waterfall with stuff coming out and I'll post it later.
Permalink
| January 2, 2012, 9:42 am
Quoting andros tempest
what type of camera are you using?

Now you're testing me. It's a digital Dimage A200.

Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 4:23 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Seth :D
What advice do you have for this MOC? http://mocpages.com/moc.php/302224

Also, I hope you don't mind, but how about this other hardsuit I recently made?
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/302548


Sorry for the delay, Seth - I'm struggling to get caught up with everything...

Okay, let's start with the Speed MOC. Love the SNOT work in it for starters. That cleans up the appearance so much! Nice presentation, as well. I think you really did a good job of putting this MOC in the best light possible.

I think some additional details in the background structure might have been nice - things like a window ledge, flowers (vs just the 1 x 1 rounds), guttering under the roof line, more height to the tree...things like that. I understand it's a background, and you don't want to take away from the main subjects in the front. But, with Lego, usually (not always, but usually) the more fun details you can put in to enhance the quality of the build, the better. I say "enhance the quality" because the wrong kind of detailing can be overkill. Here, however, I think more would be suitable.

With the rocket's launch I might have suggested using various rounds for the smoke/flames. For example; starting with trans yellow, then trans neon orange, then trans orange, trans red, and finally trans black. Even just three of those to suggest flames to smoke might have been fun. Just a thought.

With the hard suit, I was really impressed with the figure's contrapasto (best way to describe that, if you're not familiar with the term, is "sense of weight shift"). He really has a very believable pose.

Personally, I felt like the surface area was a little visually cluttered, though. This being a result of the multple parts used in the suit. That's the real challenge of building in such a small scale. I think the parts usage is outstanding for creating the proportions and the posing ability. But you sacrifice surface texture for the effect. I don't have any one suggestion, but rather am just expressing my own opinion on the look of the suit. I might have opted for different parts combos in an effort to smooth out certain areas of the suit (for a smoother look). Regardless, though, I still think you've managed a wonderful pose, and that's a tough thing to achieve on such a scale.

Hope these thoughts are worthwhile. Keep up the good work! Cheers!

Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 8:17 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Thank you. But what should I use for the black background? Like a sheet of black card or something?


Yeah, the black shirt can work in a pinch, if your MOC is small enough. Some people like to use black foam core board, or black poster board. I went to a fabric store and got a HUGE roll of black fabric (flannel so it doesn't reflect light) on sale. That works wonders. I start there, and then go into photoshop and actually paint out the black fabric with the paint tool. That way the background is completely even and clean.

Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 8:21 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Hey Mr Kelso, when I use flash on my camera the quality of the image is greatly increased. However, when I am photographing MOCs that are made of mostly white bricks I have to turn flash off otherwise the images are unidentifiable. But as I said, when flash is off the picture is slightly blurry.
What would you suggest I do to keep flash on but not have just a white photo?
Perhaps I should use a diffent coloured background? At the moment I am using a white background.

Help!


Try playing around with this. It might work for you, might not - but, I use this technique with my camera all of the time to great affect when circumstances call for something between a flash exposure and a non-flash exposure...

Take a piece of white printer paper and place it right over the flash bulb on the camera, and take the shot. Then move the paper further away by an inch or two, and try another shot. Do this a few times with the paper covering the flash at different distances, and look at the effect. You can, of course, delete any bad shots, so don't be shy about trying different options.

What happens is that the camera thinks it's still hitting the subject with the full flash - so it exposes the image accordingly. But what's really happening is that the subject is getting less light. Your whites will start showing more detail and the pic will be darker. You may need to go into the shot afterwards with a photo-editor and balance out the image, but this option may give you the starting point you need to capture details in the lighter areas.

There are a ton of variables: cameras respond differently depending on what type you have, paper thickness plays a role, and ambient light is an issue. So again, might work, might not. But, give it a try and see what happens...it's does well for me.

Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 8:31 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
Cameras, flash and pieces of paper

Similarly, if you don't use flash, you can hold a bit of white paper over a darkly coloured moc to trick the camera into taking a brighter picture.
Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 9:00 am
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Thank you. But what should I use for the black background? Like a sheet of black card or something?
As I shoot with black background alot I suggest black velvet with low lighting it can make some things look great

Permalink
| January 3, 2012, 6:53 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Interesting. I'll give it a go.
One more question, if you have the time.
I used to delete the background from my photos and replace it with a pure white one on Photoshop. Sometimes these imgaes look more tidy than ones I havn't deleted the background from.
http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=217436&id=/user_images/29688/12806600396

However, the images in which I havn't removed the background from look good in the way that the MOC is creating a slight shadow.
http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=282168&id=/user_images/29688/1312018047m

Which do you think is better and why?
Permalink
| January 4, 2012, 3:52 am
Hey mark! I was wondering if you could give feedback on my mocs such as this... http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/289437 http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/298905

I want to get to be a better landscaper and make rocks and the ground flow nicley. Do you have any advice? In that star wars series I have not done more landscaping yet because it all takes place inside the base or on kamino.

But anyway if you could give advice it would be greatly appriceated! Thanks!
Permalink
| January 4, 2012, 12:26 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Sorry for the delay, Seth - I'm struggling to get caught up with everything...

Okay, let's start with the Speed MOC. Love the SNOT work in it for starters. That cleans up the appearance so much! Nice presentation, as well. I think you really did a good job of putting this MOC in the best light possible.

I think some additional details in the background structure might have been nice - things like a window ledge, flowers (vs just the 1 x 1 rounds), guttering under the roof line, more height to the tree...things like that. I understand it's a background, and you don't want to take away from the main subjects in the front. But, with Lego, usually (not always, but usually) the more fun details you can put in to enhance the quality of the build, the better. I say "enhance the quality" because the wrong kind of detailing can be overkill. Here, however, I think more would be suitable.

With the rocket's launch I might have suggested using various rounds for the smoke/flames. For example; starting with trans yellow, then trans neon orange, then trans orange, trans red, and finally trans black. Even just three of those to suggest flames to smoke might have been fun. Just a thought.

With the hard suit, I was really impressed with the figure's contrapasto (best way to describe that, if you're not familiar with the term, is "sense of weight shift"). He really has a very believable pose.

Personally, I felt like the surface area was a little visually cluttered, though. This being a result of the multple parts used in the suit. That's the real challenge of building in such a small scale. I think the parts usage is outstanding for creating the proportions and the posing ability. But you sacrifice surface texture for the effect. I don't have any one suggestion, but rather am just expressing my own opinion on the look of the suit. I might have opted for different parts combos in an effort to smooth out certain areas of the suit (for a smoother look). Regardless, though, I still think you've managed a wonderful pose, and that's a tough thing to achieve on such a scale.

Hope these thoughts are worthwhile. Keep up the good work! Cheers!

Thanks! I'll take this and put it into further MOC's!
Permalink
| January 4, 2012, 3:23 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Arnas Scheel
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Thank you. But what should I use for the black background? Like a sheet of black card or something?
As I shoot with black background alot I suggest black velvet with low lighting it can make some things look great


Different materials will reflect light differently, so it might help to think ahead of time what kind of dark background effect one likes...

For example, I eliminate all reflections for a completely blank background, so a very soft, non-reflective material is best for me. Others have used posterboard, and get a very different effect (which I love, personally). It reflects some light, doesn't go completely black, allows a shadow from the MOC to show up, and varies in it's appearance depending on the light source.

Those are just two of a ton of options - so some experimentation may need to be done to see what works best.


Permalink
| January 5, 2012, 8:04 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Space Gypsy .
Interesting. I'll give it a go.
One more question, if you have the time.
I used to delete the background from my photos and replace it with a pure white one on Photoshop. Sometimes these imgaes look more tidy than ones I havn't deleted the background from.
http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=217436&id=/user_images/29688/12806600396

However, the images in which I havn't removed the background from look good in the way that the MOC is creating a slight shadow.
http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=282168&id=/user_images/29688/1312018047m

Which do you think is better and why?


Personally, between the two, I prefer the one with no shadow. ONLY because the background looks cleaner. The one with the shadow is dull and grey, and it makes the whole image feel too dark.

The ideal, I think, would be to combine the two. Have a solid, pure white background, and then add a soft drop shadow under the MOC using a photoediting application. You'll see this technique a lot from the more advanced builders on Flickr, and it works brilliantly.

Permalink
| January 5, 2012, 8:10 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Austin Durick
Hey mark! I was wondering if you could give feedback on my mocs such as this... http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/289437 http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/298905

I want to get to be a better landscaper and make rocks and the ground flow nicley. Do you have any advice? In that star wars series I have not done more landscaping yet because it all takes place inside the base or on kamino.

But anyway if you could give advice it would be greatly appriceated! Thanks!


Hmmm...okay, the two biggest things I can suggest...

1) Try to aquire some smaller plates that you can utilize in the landscaping, especially green. The larger plates are fine for blocking out areas, but to get more subtle forms, you're going to need to use 1 x 1's, and 1 x 2's. Have a look at this one, just as an example...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matijagrguric/6378903593/in/photostream

Notice how he's created angles in the dirt mounds using smaller plates, and how he's broken up some of the dirt areas where the soldiers are walking by using 1 x 1's.

Also, some smaller wedge plates would be nice, to create some angular lines.

2) Any time you're incorporating water into a MOC, I really recommend using either tiles, or turning the bricks on their sides for the surface of the water. I say this because our minds percieve water as being smooth and highly reflective (even though at times it can be very rough). By making the water section of a MOC smoother, the viewer immediately perceives it as something different from the surrounding ground. Add color differences - usually blues - and you've got a nice effect.

So, agian, in short - angles and more subtle forms in the ground areas, and smoother surfaces for water areas would be my suggestions.

Hope this helps a bit.

Permalink
| January 5, 2012, 8:25 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


Good you said that word "Apocalypse" ;)

Hi Mr. Kelso,
I have a build a Apoc Vignette the last day and I think it could use some work somehow. Could you please give some advice on this?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/303107
Thanks.
Deff .
Permalink
| January 5, 2012, 9:30 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Hmmm...okay, the two biggest things I can suggest...

1) Try to aquire some smaller plates that you can utilize in the landscaping, especially green. The larger plates are fine for blocking out areas, but to get more subtle forms, you're going to need to use 1 x 1's, and 1 x 2's. Have a look at this one, just as an example...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matijagrguric/6378903593/in/photostream

Notice how he's created angles in the dirt mounds using smaller plates, and how he's broken up some of the dirt areas where the soldiers are walking by using 1 x 1's.

Also, some smaller wedge plates would be nice, to create some angular lines.

2) Any time you're incorporating water into a MOC, I really recommend using either tiles, or turning the bricks on their sides for the surface of the water. I say this because our minds percieve water as being smooth and highly reflective (even though at times it can be very rough). By making the water section of a MOC smoother, the viewer immediately perceives it as something different from the surrounding ground. Add color differences - usually blues - and you've got a nice effect.

So, agian, in short - angles and more subtle forms in the ground areas, and smoother surfaces for water areas would be my suggestions.

Hope this helps a bit.

Okay I see what you mean. I will be at legoland in a few weeks so I will buy about $200 worth of peices there.;) I will hopfully get more outdoor pieces thanks for the feedback.

Oh and I forgot to give you this moc! It is the favorite outdoor MOC I have made and I want to know what you think! http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/296710
Permalink
| January 5, 2012, 10:44 am
Hey Sorry about all the advice I've been asking for, I'm just trying to get every ounce of advice i can get out of you before you die :P

Anyways, sorry about the MOC being starwars ( Yet again ) but I find this a MOC I need some help on, one thing I was wondering about is what detail should i add teh to teh shack? ( as it is already made into scrap for my next project) should I rebuild it 100% and repost and updated version or what?
Permalink
| January 6, 2012, 9:48 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Again, thanks for the advice. I will try using the techniques you suggested.
Permalink
| January 7, 2012, 5:08 am
I made a Andriod Tablet, and would like if you took a look at it. Thanks. :D

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303581
Permalink
| January 7, 2012, 4:24 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


Hey Kelso, I would like some of your advice on my car building before I decide to build a new model.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/283380
Permalink
| January 7, 2012, 4:33 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


Could you check out this mech? http://mocpages.com/moc.php/301459
It is the first time I have made a mech, and I'm not sure how it went
thanks
Permalink
| January 7, 2012, 8:11 pm
Hi Kelso. I would enjoy hearing your opinion on my Skyhopper. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/269893
This is my personal favorite creation, and yet it doesn't seem to be very popular.
Permalink
| January 10, 2012, 3:33 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Arnas Scheel
Hey Sorry about all the advice I've been asking for, I'm just trying to get every ounce of advice i can get out of you before you die :P

Anyways, sorry about the MOC being starwars ( Yet again ) but I find this a MOC I need some help on, one thing I was wondering about is what detail should i add teh to teh shack? ( as it is already made into scrap for my next project) should I rebuild it 100% and repost and updated version or what?


Can you give me a link to the MOC you're referring to?

Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 7:32 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Seth :D
I made a Andriod Tablet, and would like if you took a look at it. Thanks. :D

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303581


Nice, Seth. My only suggestion might have been to create some custom stickers for the various windows - to add detail.

Meanwhile, I love the smooth quality of the no-studs approach, and the fact that you took the time to do the back side. It's a very simple object, but nevertheless, you handled it quite nicely. Well done!

Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 7:38 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Marty Ford
Hey Kelso, I would like some of your advice on my car building before I decide to build a new model.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/283380


Some nice work, Marty! I think your proportions are quite good, and you've got a knack for capturing the form, as well.

I'm wondering if you've ever tried using more SNOT technique on one of your car builds? At this stage, your detail is so nice that the studs are starting to interfere with the surface texture. SNOT techniques will also help you to start to develope ways of making more complex curves in a form. And that may be an additional advantage for your next creations. Older vehicles can often get away with being somewhat boxy when done in Lego, but if you start doing more current auto designs, the ability to create subtle curvature will become of greater importance.

By the way, I think your color work is quite nice, as well.

Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 7:46 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Scrambled Eggs
Could you check out this mech? http://mocpages.com/moc.php/301459
It is the first time I have made a mech, and I'm not sure how it went
thanks


Not bad, for a first attempt. I like the mobility of this one, in particular.

I think something you might shoot for in future Mech creations, would be more complexity within each section of the mech's body parts. That doesn't necessarily mean making it more cluttered, mind you...but, rather that it would be cool to see more thought and care put into each section. So, a leg, for example, might be a combination of 50 - 100 pieces, vs. just 10 - 20. The end result will be a MOC that's more advanced, more detailed, and one that's appears very carefully crafted.

Doing this will take time and patience, but it's worth the extra effort to see a piece done with greater detail and precision.

Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 7:59 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Sir Balamorgineas
Hi Kelso. I would enjoy hearing your opinion on my Skyhopper. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/269893
This is my personal favorite creation, and yet it doesn't seem to be very popular.


Thats a fun design. I like the upside down 2x2 round plates. I'm surprised, as well, that you don't have a few more comments on it.

As for the build, itself, I think perhaps a bit more complexity in the body of the ship might be nice, and fewer exposed studs. I just mentioned - in the comment above - that the builder might consider shooting for more detail in the MOC. I'd say the same here. While creating more complex designs is time consuming, the end result is worth the investment.

As an alternative, if you don't want to spend a lot of time piecing together MOCs (which I tend to go overboard doing), I'd recommend using some more unique parts, with curves, angles, etc. to spice up something that's not real parts intensive. In other words, you can have a simple creation, but use really interesting pieces in unique ways. Here's an example:

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/299884

Not very complex with the volume of pieces, but some really unique choices and uses of parts.

By doing creations that are either more highly detailed and clean (i.e. fewer studs), or by utilizing parts that have nice form and detail already in them, I think you'll find more people responding to them.

Hope this helps - good luck!

Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 8:10 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Some nice work, Marty! I think your proportions are quite good, and you've got a knack for capturing the form, as well.

I'm wondering if you've ever tried using more SNOT technique on one of your car builds? At this stage, your detail is so nice that the studs are starting to interfere with the surface texture. SNOT techniques will also help you to start to develope ways of making more complex curves in a form. And that may be an additional advantage for your next creations. Older vehicles can often get away with being somewhat boxy when done in Lego, but if you start doing more current auto designs, the ability to create subtle curvature will become of greater importance.

By the way, I think your color work is quite nice, as well.

Thank's Kelso! this will help me a lot :)
Permalink
| January 11, 2012, 6:51 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Can you give me a link to the MOC you're referring to?
Opps sorry I was on an ipod
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303409

But now that you're at it can you take a look of my first mecha?

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303712

Thanks!
Permalink
| January 12, 2012, 6:24 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Arnas Scheel
Quoting Mark Kelso

Can you give me a link to the MOC you're referring to?
Opps sorry I was on an ipod
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303409

But now that you're at it can you take a look of my first mecha?

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/303712

Thanks!



Alrighty then...Let's see...

With the Sith outpost MOC, I think you've done a good job with the action. I also like the fact that with some of the rock elements, you turned them at an odd angle - very effective. You also varied the height of the MOC, which was nice, too.

The "shack," as you called it, was very plain, and I was having difficulty deciding if it was landscaping, or a manmade element in the MOC. Given that you called it a shack, I'm assuming it's meant to be a manmade structure.

With that in mind, there are several things you might have opted for, in order to spruce it up a bit. To begin with, I would have tiled out the roof, or gone SNOT with it. It would have smoothed out the texture and given us a visual indicator that the building was something different from the rocks around it (which included studs). You could've also chosen a different color - this would be another visual cue to help seperate it from the surroundings. I also think a bit more detail might have helped. Just a hint of greebling (like a panel with buttons, or some wiring) might have given us a hint that it was manmade, in addition to just creating some nice detail. Other options might have been equipment on the roof, or doors and/or windows of some kind.

By the way, the photography was quite nice - very crisp, clean shots. I wonder if you're at a point where you could start playing with some dramatic lighting and different focal compositions to add to the scenes you create.

As for the mech, I think it's a good first attempt. I'd like to see more complexity in the work, though. (That seems to be the theme for the week here in this thread!) The body is basically a box, and the leg elements are simply a couple of pieces with hinges...

I might suggest pushing yourself to create more complex forms with each body part. Try using some greebling in select areas, and use a larger number of parts in areas like the legs to aquire greater detail and more volume (the legs felt a little small compared to the body, in my opinion).

You could even start looking at stickers to add detail in certain areas. It's often a nice way to top off the look of a well-executed MOC.

That's my .02 for today - hope it helps a bit. Good luck!

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| January 13, 2012, 7:52 am
Any advice for a person who has a great variety of pieces but not very much of the same color or style, which makes bigger MOCs (especially buildings) really difficult to do because I'm anal about having a consistent color palette. I usually build vehicles, but I want to get into buildings? Is there anything I can do before making a trip to a Lego store that features pick a brick? I'm a college student, so I have to save up for awhile to buy Legos, just cause they're not as important as food and rent. Ideas?
Permalink
| January 13, 2012, 11:15 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Cory Johnson
Any advice for a person who has a great variety of pieces but not very much of the same color or style, which makes bigger MOCs (especially buildings) really difficult to do because I'm anal about having a consistent color palette. I usually build vehicles, but I want to get into buildings? Is there anything I can do before making a trip to a Lego store that features pick a brick? I'm a college student, so I have to save up for awhile to buy Legos, just cause they're not as important as food and rent. Ideas?


Volume of parts is ALWAYS an issue, and unfortunately your options are limited as to how to deal with the problem.

Since I'm getting the impression you'd like to start working larger, then adding to your collection is really the only option (the other being to work small). Of course, you can get mileage out of your parts by creating subtructral work that's hollow, and uses sound engineering concepts for structural support. And given that it won't be seen, it can be any color.

Nevertheless, you're probably going to need to look into purchases. I'd go to BrickLink and see what options are available there before going to the Lego Store. Sometimes one option is better than the other, sometimes they're about the same - it just depends on your needs. PAB on line is another option.

I don't know if you're a member of a LUG or not (assuming here that you know what LUG's are - if not, let me know, and I'll explain). But, LUG members get discounts on large volume purchases for creations that they use for group displays.

Also, it doesn't hurt to check things like ebay and Craig's List. You can even search garage sales, or put up flyers in your community asking for Lego.

All in all, I'd just recommend doing your homework before starting to purchase. Decide what you need most, and look into all of the above options to ask yourself which ones might provide the best opportunities. And then build "smart" to get the most mileage out of your collection (SNOT techniques, use technic parts for substructures, create only facades, etc.)

Oh, one other thing. Think about what color you're going to use the most. Some colors are less expensive than others. I, for example, bought a ton of used whites. I use them a lot for substructure work because no one sees it, and it's the best bang for my buck.


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| January 14, 2012, 7:19 am
Once again I am here to try to improve my MOC... I hope I can follow your advice :P
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/304522
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| January 15, 2012, 8:59 am
I'd appreciate it if you'd give us some advice on our latest animation test:http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/303621

LB Jr.
Permalink
| January 15, 2012, 11:08 am
How is Moc of the day chosen?
Permalink
| January 16, 2012, 6:30 am
Quoting Ben King
How is Moc of the day chosen?

It's a computerized random choice. After the MOC meets certain requirements the computer selects randy
Mly....
Permalink
| January 16, 2012, 9:16 am
Any advice/tips for this?: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/304775
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| January 16, 2012, 6:33 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Arnas Scheel
Once again I am here to try to improve my MOC... I hope I can follow your advice :P
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/304522


Well, the post indicated that you're primary goal was to experiment a bit with your presentation, which was quite good. The white background is nice and clean, and it looks as though your subjects are fairly well lit - lights and darks are all showing up pretty clearly. So, well done there.

As for the build itself, I'm guessing it took maybe ten minutes to put together? Nothing wrong with that whatsoever, mind you, as long as you aren't expecting a lot of return in the way of comments or feedback. Personally, though, I would like to see more detail in the landscaping. For example, the bridge was a collection of plates and nothing more. Did you consider using arches of some kind? Or perhaps using combinations of bricks, plates, tiles, etc. to construct a bridge that was studless, and maybe had some unique features - slats, railings, posts, that sort of thing?

Also, I think some SNOT technique on the stream might have been nice, instead of the studs up approach. Every element within your MOC had the same texture. By changing the stream to a smoother surface you would have created a visual seperation from the studded elements in the build, and this would help the viewer better recognize the subject for what is was. Water - even muddied water (or in this case polluted) - is reflective, and smoother surfaces in Lego are more reflective. So by going SNOT with it, you would have given the viewer a clue as to what that element in the build was. I had to read the commentary to realize that it was a stream - I thought initially that it was grass.

So in short, nice presentation, and for the build I'd recommend more time invested to really bring out some detail.

Keep at it!

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| January 19, 2012, 7:44 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Lego Builders
I'd appreciate it if you'd give us some advice on our latest animation test:http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/303621

LB Jr.


Nice! One thing that caught my attention was the variable rate of speed in the movements of objects within the test. The more variety you can achieve in all aspects of the animation, the stronger the work becomes. So, by continuing to work on having different subjects moving at various speeds, you're broadening the pallette from which you work.

I still feel like there are a couple of basics to really watch. The lighting is still a bit inconsistent, so I'm seeing some flash effect. It's a tough thing to do, but if you can set up your light and exposure so it's absolutely consistent, you'll find the animation as a whole looking very smooth. Along with that, I'm seeing some variation in camera position. This becomes evident when you put together a string of images and start seeing the background look like it's shaking a little. Again, consistency is the key. Don't let your camera shift even a millimeter. The best option is to have a cable shutter button. But those are only available on some cameras. But if it's an option, I'd certainly go for that. You don't touch the camera at all when you go to take the shot.

In general, though, this work adds up to some very solid sketches. I'd love to see some story lines, or more complex ideas when you guys feel like you're ready to tackle them.

Keep up the great work!

Permalink
| January 19, 2012, 7:56 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
Any advice/tips for this?: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/304775


Not, bad, Matthew!

I think the proportions are quite nice. I wonder if the wings might need to be just a skosh longer? But in general, the proportions are very good.

I think I might have tried using bricks on their sides for the wing elements. While it makes for a thicker wing, the smoothness of the surface would be preferable to the studs.

I'm tossing in a link here to a biplane that I thought was nicely done. Of course getting the rounded feel AND a taper to the fuselage is always tricky, but this link should provide some options there as well.

Good to see ya cranking out some more work. Hope this helps a little!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/plasticmatt/3719148776/


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| January 19, 2012, 8:05 am
Thanks for your advice! We think we've found a solution for the lighting. :)

Can you comment/advice on my micro? Thanks!
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305247

-LB Jr.
Permalink
| January 19, 2012, 4:56 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Lego Builders
Thanks for your advice! We think we've found a solution for the lighting. :)

Can you comment/advice on my micro? Thanks!
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305247

-LB Jr.


I actually just commented on your piece as I was scrolling through the day's new posts.

I mentioned liking the color work and the SNOT work. Makes for a clean looking build.

Normally I would suggest continuing that and doing away with the studs on the castle, too, but the studs give it a ramparts kind of feel, which I like.

I wouldn't mind seeing some height variation to the castle, with maybe some towers, more buildings, etc. I think it would be a helpful addition, and add focus to the main subject of the MOC.

Now get crackin' on some more of those killer animations - I'm hungry for more!

Permalink
| January 20, 2012, 1:20 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso


Could you check this out? http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305437
While it looked good in person, I now notice it may be too textured and not very colour co-ordinated. What do you think? Any advice would be great, as I'm planning many more ships in the future.
Permalink
| January 20, 2012, 8:49 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Hi, Kelso, I'm looking for some advice. I just recently returned to the pirates theme after a whole year, and with some newly-acquired techniques, I made this: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305526 I figured advice from you would be useful, since you're so good at landscaping. If you can find the time to give your insight, that would be greatly appreciated! :)

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| January 21, 2012, 11:58 am
Quoting Owen S.
Hi, Kelso, I'm looking for some advice. I just recently returned to the pirates theme after a whole year, and with some newly-acquired techniques, I made this: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305526 I figured advice from you would be useful, since you're so good at landscaping. If you can find the time to give your insight, that would be greatly appreciated! :)

Owen, get your @55 back in eXtreme TFOLs! :p
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| January 21, 2012, 12:07 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

...before the 2012 Apocalypse.

Otherwise I may have difficulty getting back with you! ;)


Do you mean the end-of-the-world Apocalypse, or is MOCpages gonna go down again? ;)
Permalink
| January 22, 2012, 10:26 am
 Group admin 
Quoting LukeClarenceVan The Revanchist
Could you check this out? http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305437
While it looked good in person, I now notice it may be too textured and not very colour co-ordinated. What do you think? Any advice would be great, as I'm planning many more ships in the future.


For starters, I thought the idea for the MOC was pretty hilarious - just those huge faces on the side...cracks me up.

I think the genral concept for the form is kind of cool. I wonder if a sleeker version - more elongated - might have been an option for you? It feels a little bulky to me - but, that's just a matter of taste. As for the color, the bleys are fine, but I think they're a bit too mottled. By blocking out your colors, you can help the viewer see the form easier. And there's also a believability factor - if a real ship were of various colors, you're more likely to see those differing colors in whole, large areas rather than mixed.

Here are links to a few smaller ships that I like from other builders. These show what I'm referring to with the color blocking, as well as a less bulky form...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/va-nugget/5986856688/in/faves-22824835@N05/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/phallmaster/5967045893/in/faves-22824835@N05/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dasnewten/4142412982/in/set-72157624074166259/
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| January 23, 2012, 8:34 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Owen S.
Hi, Kelso, I'm looking for some advice. I just recently returned to the pirates theme after a whole year, and with some newly-acquired techniques, I made this: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305526 I figured advice from you would be useful, since you're so good at landscaping. If you can find the time to give your insight, that would be greatly appreciated! :)


Nice little MOC, Owen! I think technique-wise, this is pretty strong. The rock work is very convincing, and I like what appears to be a hinged element for the greenery above the rocks. I'm seeing a bit of a curve, and that's a nice look.

Compositionally, I'm wondering if the tree might be better off either at the back of the MOC, or over to one side. I say this because it's a fairly large element within the composition, and you've got it smack-dab in the middle. This is drawing attention away from the figures a little - it creates kind of a bullseye effect for the piece. Of course, MOC's are 3-d, so as you move around it, that effect is altered. But, still, the way it's photographed is probably the main way in which people would view it, and I might suggest having the tree a little less obtrusive.

That's about the only nit I can really come up with. I'm not a huge fan of seeing studs, but this one seems to carry them without too much trouble. The action's solid, and the color work is also nice. All in all, a very good creation! (IMHO)



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| January 23, 2012, 8:44 am
 Group admin 
Quoting ~~ Patrick~~ .
Mark please can I have some advice on this:
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305495. It is just a WIP at the moment so, can you tell me what I could add/improve.

Thanks again


Hi, Patrick!

Well, for starters I really like the composition. There's actually a term in art for what you've got going on...it's called a steelyard composition - that's where one side is visually heavier than the other. The rule of thumb is that by making things asymmetrical, you create something more appealing than if it had full symmetry.

I also like the angular set of the smaller building. That breaks up the blockyness of the MOC to some degree.

I think the facade of the castle might be improved upon with some more variation in the surface. What I mean is like...windows that are inset just a little, or architectural detailing around openings.

I also wonder if maybe you could beef up the landscaping a bit with more foliage on the tree, and additional greenery in select areas of the MOC (example: http://www.flickr.com/photos/45244184@N04/6227282747/in/faves-22824835@N05/ )

My .02, for what it's worth. Keep at it!

Permalink
| January 23, 2012, 8:55 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Legobob ~
Do you mean the end-of-the-world Apocalypse, or is MOCpages gonna go down again? ;)


LOL! When MOCpages goes down, it always FEELS like the end of the world to me! ;)


Permalink
| January 23, 2012, 8:57 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

For starters, I thought the idea for the MOC was pretty hilarious - just those huge faces on the side...cracks me up.

I think the genral concept for the form is kind of cool. I wonder if a sleeker version - more elongated - might have been an option for you? It feels a little bulky to me - but, that's just a matter of taste. As for the color, the bleys are fine, but I think they're a bit too mottled. By blocking out your colors, you can help the viewer see the form easier. And there's also a believability factor - if a real ship were of various colors, you're more likely to see those differing colors in whole, large areas rather than mixed.

Here are links to a few smaller ships that I like from other builders. These show what I'm referring to with the color blocking, as well as a less bulky form...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/va-nugget/5986856688/in/faves-22824835@N05/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/phallmaster/5967045893/in/faves-22824835@N05/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dasnewten/4142412982/in/set-72157624074166259/

Thanks! I'll definitely keep this in mind, and see if I can't do some more interesting shaping next time. As for the colours, I completely agree. Unfortunately, I had to rush the prow as I only had a couple of hours before the deadline. Thanks again for the advice, and the references will be helpful.
Permalink
| January 23, 2012, 9:23 am
Hi Mark, firstly many thanks for your kind comments on my MOCs, its nice to know I'm heading in the right direction!

Onto my question;

I've seen some great uses of the 2x1 brick curved wall technique in castle walls, and in a few spacecraft (Nathan Proudlove's 'Blacktron II' to name a particular favourite), and I'm thinking of building a ship fairly big and curvy. The problem is, I don't want to build in black for this one, but then again, I don't want the hull of my ship to look like its a stone wall because I built it in old light grey. My real question is, how can I get away with this, ie. disguise the black cracks which appear when using this technique? I've done some test builds in light grey, and can't see a good way of getting around it, other than with Photoshop :) Any ideas/comments would be appreciated - I suppose I could build in dark bley to lessen the problem, but I do love old grey...


Thanks in advance!
Permalink
| January 25, 2012, 9:11 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Jon B
Hi Mark, firstly many thanks for your kind comments on my MOCs, its nice to know I'm heading in the right direction!

Onto my question;

I've seen some great uses of the 2x1 brick curved wall technique in castle walls, and in a few spacecraft (Nathan Proudlove's 'Blacktron II' to name a particular favourite), and I'm thinking of building a ship fairly big and curvy. The problem is, I don't want to build in black for this one, but then again, I don't want the hull of my ship to look like its a stone wall because I built it in old light grey. My real question is, how can I get away with this, ie. disguise the black cracks which appear when using this technique? I've done some test builds in light grey, and can't see a good way of getting around it, other than with Photoshop :) Any ideas/comments would be appreciated - I suppose I could build in dark bley to lessen the problem, but I do love old grey...


Thanks in advance!



Oh, man.. There's so much to talk about here. This topic is on the cutting edge of today's building techniques. We'd be better off at a bar with some drinks for this discussion. But, I'll try to offer some thoughts. Honestly, I think your building skill is as good as mine, so I'm not sure what I can offer here, but for what it's worth...

By the way, Lego is about comprimise, so no solution is going to be perfect.

For starters, the cracks between bricks will mostly show up to the same degree with every color because the cracks aren't black really, but just a darker version of whatever color you're using. So grey curvature will see grey darker grey cracks, green will see darker green etc. I used white for Minas Tirith last year, and the cracks weren't terrible. Of course, each person has their own opinion about what looks good and what doesn't.

I suppose one approach you could take would be what I call visual distractions. If you have a large surface area that has the curvature, and want to keep the viewer's eye from picking up on the cracks between bricks, then you can add detailing here and there in the way of tiles, greebling, stickers, etc. to sort of "busy-up" the area. The additional detailing will draw the eye away from those pesky seperations in the bricks. It doesn't have to be massive amounts, just enough to "distract."

I think it's often good to break up large, smooth surface areas anyway. For good visaul balance, we need some areas to be very plain and simple. But, too much can be just as bad as too little. So by incorporating some surface details that keep us from noticing the seperation of brick, we're also enhancing the look and feel of the surface texture.

One other option I can offer is to use rounds every now and again so the panel bends a little as if it were hinged. This is how I handled the Cylon Raider MOC a while back (http://mocpages.com/moc.php/26265). If you look closely, I used rounds to create the bend in the brick wing panels, and then ran stickers over the rounds to hide their surface variation. This worked quite well, IMHO. Perhaps a combo of the two techniques might also be an option.


Permalink
| January 26, 2012, 4:12 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Jon B
Hi Mark, firstly many thanks for your kind comments on my MOCs, its nice to know I'm heading in the right direction!

Onto my question;

I've seen some great uses of the 2x1 brick curved wall technique in castle walls, and in a few spacecraft (Nathan Proudlove's 'Blacktron II' to name a particular favourite), and I'm thinking of building a ship fairly big and curvy. The problem is, I don't want to build in black for this one, but then again, I don't want the hull of my ship to look like its a stone wall because I built it in old light grey. My real question is, how can I get away with this, ie. disguise the black cracks which appear when using this technique? I've done some test builds in light grey, and can't see a good way of getting around it, other than with Photoshop :) Any ideas/comments would be appreciated - I suppose I could build in dark bley to lessen the problem, but I do love old grey...


Thanks in advance!


Sorry for the delay in getting back with you, Jon. I wrote out a novel, hit the "continue" button and then walked away. I should know better than to do that with MOCpages! Obviously what I wrote was lost. So, let's give this another shot...

To begin with, what you're talking about is on the front line of battle with builder's and our quest for ever better techniques. We're all searching for ways to get these crazy blocks to bend convincingly. I've got a couple of thoughts to throw your way, but given your building skill is every bit as good as mine, I don't know how much worth it will be.

Lego is always about compromise. When getting these larger surface areas to curve, one of the compromises comes in the form of the cracks between bricks that you're referring to. The tighter the curvature, the more visible the "seams" between the bricks become. So one option is to keep the curvature mild, or go very large scale with your creations (which opens a whole new can of worms!). With a larger MOC the curvature proportionately gets milder, thus the cracks become less evident. Also, people tend to view larger creations from farther away, so that helps as well.

I think, however, the best solution, given where we all are right now with parts options and building technique, is to use a method that I would define as "distraction." I'll often incorporate tiles, greeb work, stickers, etc. into large simple surface areas in order to visually break up the space a bit. This has the effect of busying up the area, which pulls the eye away from such things as those cracks between bricks, and causes the viewer to focus on the new textures and surface detailing. They're distracted by the detail work that's breaking up the space, and notice the unwanted effects far less.

Imagine a large light grey curved surface (done with the 1 x 2's). If it's just that surface, the seams will be somewhat evident. Now add to that curved surface some decals with text or wiring. Throw in some tiles sitting above the surface, and maybe some minor greeb work - even mix in hits of complimentary colors - and suddenly those cracks become far less obvious.

One other technique I've used to create curvature might be worth mentioning here. In the Cylon Raider MOC I did a while back, I went studs out for the wings, and then created hinged sections here and there with 1 x 1 rounds. This allowed for the bend that you see in the wings. I then covered the rounds with stickers to create a very smooth surface texture. It turned out to be very effective, and provided a slightly tighter bend than just stressing 1 x 2 bricks. Here's the MOC:

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/26265

Perhaps a combo of the two techniques mentioned above might serve your purposes, dunno.

Anyway, that's the short version of this topic. Hope this helps a bit. Looking forward to seeing what you're up to, that's for sure. Love your work!

Good luck!
Permalink
| January 27, 2012, 8:38 am
Mark, thanks for such a detailed and informative reply - I feel a little guilty for taking up so much of your time!

You've given me a lot to think about - for one, I hadn't even considered stickers/decals. As you suggest, if I build large on this (which was the plan) its got to be a combination of methods. I also thought of something else - just using concave curves, but that'd be a complete rethink on shape!

Your Raider - I hadn't spotted that before, and you pretty much achieved the sort of curve I'd be aiming for with that - very neat technique. Well done for not butchering one of my favourite childhood ships!

Again, thanks for the tips/ideas, just hope I can get something done before it all ends ;)

Jon


Permalink
| January 28, 2012, 6:17 am
 Group admin 
Quoting ~~ Patrick~~ .
Mark please can I have some advice on this: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/306712 It is my second WIP of the castle so, can you tell me what I could add/improve. I also, tried to use the advice you told me last time and it looks much better

Thanks again


Right on, Patrick. I like the addition of depth in the windows.

I think perhaps the tree trunks might be a bit thick for the amount of foliage on them. But nice shaping of the trunk on that larger tree.

Looking forward to seeing what you do with the rest of the castle.


Permalink
| January 28, 2012, 7:44 am
Hello, Mr. Kelso. Can you check out this MOC and tell me what I should do in the future to improve. If you can, Thank You so much http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/302800
Permalink
| January 28, 2012, 8:46 am
Hey Mark, I have a WIP dragon. It is kinda completed but I feel that I want to improve. Can you give me advice? Thanks.

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305516
Permalink
| January 28, 2012, 8:53 am
I've got a double dose of MocAge for you Mark!

Firstly, I have the HIGHLY anticipated H.M.S.S PHIPSON!

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/307018

And the not so highly anticipated E.N.W.G Tank V1!
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/306959

Any and all critique is welcomed :D.
Permalink
| January 29, 2012, 6:20 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Will A.
Hello, Mr. Kelso. Can you check out this MOC and tell me what I should do in the future to improve. If you can, Thank You so much http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/302800


No problem, Will.

I like the action, but I think it would be fun to see it kicked up even one more notch. Did you think about having some dude getting hit with a paintball? (Maybe you had it in there and I missed it). Nothing we all like seeing more than a fig taking some abuse, right? ;)

Also I think some more complex approaches to the structures might help a bit. Right now you've just got 1x's and 2x's stacked. And all of the studs are showing. I might suggest looking at some on line images of paintball courses and trying for some more complex features, and having them done no-studs. Even some additional landscaping might add some flare to the MOC.

Just a couple things to consider if you wanted to mess with it.

Permalink
| January 30, 2012, 9:27 am
 Group admin 
Quoting ~~ >=) Christian J (=< ~~ '
Hey Mark, I have a WIP dragon. It is kinda completed but I feel that I want to improve. Can you give me advice? Thanks.

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/305516


Most animal subjects - including ficticious ones - are very challenging!

I think, in general you did a very good job. I particularly liked the shape of the head.

Some things I might recommend in future MOCs of this kind...

I might suggest trying to eliminate the studs and undersides of bricks and plates showing quite so much. Those surfaces tend to interfere with the form you're trying to create. In the case of animals, textures can be very helpful, but choose those textures carefully. Repeated parts can be a great option here. Using the same element over and over to create necks and tails can be a good approach. Examples:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lordoblivionthegreat/5976082126/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/44425603@N07/4083640542/

Notice, too, how the parts used are fairly small and flexible, allowing for curves to be incorporated very strongly into the model. This creates an organic feel, and lends believability to the creation.

There's actually so much to consider, that it's really difficult for me to give you specific recommendations. I think the best I can do is to tell you to look at what other builders are doing, and see what parts, techniques, etc. really turn you on. Then, emulate what they did. Start by trying to duplicate their methods, and then adjust things to your own vision.

The biggest issue, IMO though, is recognition of form. Just try to create surfaces and textures that really help to reinforce the form you're trying to achieve. And watch out for parts combos that leave gaps or confuse the viewer's eye.

Oh, that reminds me of one other thing I wanted to mention. If you use multiple colors, try to block them out somewhat. It's a little more difficult with animals, but still...if colors get too scattered about, or blotchy, it makes the form more difficult to recognize. Solid fields of color are much more effective.

This is actually a topic we could go on and on about. And, I'm sorry to be so vague. But, hopefully these general concepts will at least help you to develope specific solutions that you'll be happy with.

Keep at it!



Permalink
| January 30, 2012, 10:02 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
I've got a double dose of MocAge for you Mark!

Firstly, I have the HIGHLY anticipated H.M.S.S PHIPSON!

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/307018

And the not so highly anticipated E.N.W.G Tank V1!
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/306959

Any and all critique is welcomed :D.


Well, Matthew, I have to say that while I liked the ship, I loved the tank. I'll talk about both here, since you asked for some input...

With the Phipson, I thought the general shape was solid, and especially liked the lateral placement of the engines. It seemed to me that it might have been a bit heavy on the surface texture. I'm wondering how it might have looked if you had just a few places where there wasn't a lot of variation to the surface - in other words, areas where parts matched up perfectly and created smooth sections. I think the best MOCs use a combination of heavily greebed areas, and then other areas where the surfaces are quite plain. Pierre Fieschi's work is an excellent example:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/47881312@N04/sets/72157623431212337/

(Also, I might mention his color blocking.) Meanwhile, I think you had some really nice parts usage. Keep experimenting with different pieces for detailing, and maybe try going with a bit more SNOT work on a ship sometime. I think you could do some really cool stuff!

Now as for the tank...LOVED it. It had the very quality that I just spoke of in regard to surface texture. I also think the color choices were quite nice. I wonder if you could've gone no-studs almost entirely with this one? For example, could you have capped off the gun barrel with a bley tile? I know that would mean reversing the stud direction, but I think it would have paid off. Tiling out the area below the turret would have been nice, as well. Just a thought here...I might have tried either creating a gun barrel that had a couple of variations in the barrel's circumference (the first example I ran across: http://www.flickr.com/photos/48952109@N07/4610963171/ ), or maybe even gone the route of a more futuristic look by incorporating a rail gun.

I definitely want to bring up the use of those curved slopes. Those large smooth surfaces really do wonders for the look of the MOC. It makes it so much cleaner. And finally, I wonder if a sticker or two might have been an option...just for some detail.

Regardless, though, I really like the smooth quality of the build with this one, and the overall cleanliness of it. If you can start achieving that kind of clean look with all of your creations, you would be taking MONUMENTAL steps with your building skill. Can I say it again...can I? NICE.


Permalink
| January 31, 2012, 7:58 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Thanks for all the input Mark :D.


I do agree about the Phipson, it has been lying around for a while now, but I'll definitely be working on it some more.

Now that you mention adding more smooth areas to The Phipson, I totally agree with what you are saying!

I'll have to think about the Tank, I really want to do a V.2 but I need some of the parts elsewhere. If I do a V.2 I'll keep your tips in mind.
Permalink
| January 31, 2012, 2:57 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

No problem, Will.

I like the action, but I think it would be fun to see it kicked up even one more notch. Did you think about having some dude getting hit with a paintball? (Maybe you had it in there and I missed it). Nothing we all like seeing more than a fig taking some abuse, right? ;)

Also I think some more complex approaches to the structures might help a bit. Right now you've just got 1x's and 2x's stacked. And all of the studs are showing. I might suggest looking at some on line images of paintball courses and trying for some more complex features, and having them done no-studs. Even some additional landscaping might add some flare to the MOC.

Just a couple things to consider if you wanted to mess with it.

Thank you so, so much I really appreciate it a lot!
Permalink
| January 31, 2012, 5:00 pm
Hey Mark!
I'd like to ask for some advice on a story I've been doing, since I consider Apocalypsis by far the best story to grace the pages.
I realize this would take more time to look through then other MOCs, so I understand if you don't read it.
Here is the most recent episode.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/307383


Thanks!
Permalink
| February 2, 2012, 10:51 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Ru Corder
Hey Mark!
I'd like to ask for some advice on a story I've been doing, since I consider Apocalypsis by far the best story to grace the pages.
I realize this would take more time to look through then other MOCs, so I understand if you don't read it.
Here is the most recent episode.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/307383


Thanks!


Thanks for the kind words regarding Apocalypsis. I SO wish I could get back to that - the best part of the story is yet to come. But, life has just killed my build time for the last couple of years. (sheesh...YEARS. Not weeks, not months...years. *sigh*)

Anyway, on to your work...

LOTS of good stuff going on! I'm intrigued by the story line, for starters. Good cliff hanger, too, with them about to go through a door. Nothing like creating a mystery to bring people back!

I particularly liked the last section of that entry. I thought it outshined the first part on every level. The building was good, the camera angles were excellent, the lighting was sound, and you even had a nice close up in that section. Really nicely done.

As for the first sections, I have to admit that I felt like the lighting was a bit of a distraction. I'm assuming you are trying to eliminate all detail in the white background. But the "blowout" effect is very strong, and doesn't seem to really work with the environment or what's taking place in the story.

Sometimes the white blowout can be a very effective visual tool in creating a certain mood (the new BSG tv series comes to mind, just as an example. They used that to great effect quite a bit), but I'm not sure it's the best choice here.

I might suggest building some generic rock structures and trees that can be modular, and can make up a background for wooded scenes. Keep the camera's focus on the foreground, allowing the extras to go out of focus, and you can use those "backdrops" over and over again.

Also, I'm wondering if you might be able to achieve some really tight close ups. This is something I've used (ex. http://www.flickr.com/photos/22824835@N05/3856075476/in/set-72157622015454671), and it really adds another level to the visual drama. Just a thought.

Anyway, I'm really interested in seeing where things go from here. Could you do me a HUGE favor, and let me know somehow when the next installment comes along? Like a reminder? I'd like to follow your story, but I've got so many MOCs to look at each day, that I'm afraid it might get lost in the mix.

Keep up the great work!
Permalink
| February 3, 2012, 9:27 am
Hello Kelso. I am looking into building a dragon for the first time. I thought it would be cool to make a small dragon that is roughly the size of the official molded dragon piece, yet much more pose-able. I was hoping you could give me some advice on how to do small, yet flexible creatures or maybe point me in the direction of someone who has attempted this size dragon before. Thanks.
Permalink
| February 3, 2012, 4:16 pm
Hey Mark,
I haven't posted any creations to this group yet, so I thought why not do it today finally? I would greatly appreciate it if you took a look at my Twilight Zone Tower of Terror from the Disney theme parks. My main goal with this MOC was the lighting effects, but I also wanted to create a good quality build.
Anyways, here it is. Thanks for your time!
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/306859

-daevster
Permalink
| February 3, 2012, 6:05 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Sir Balamorgineas
Hello Kelso. I am looking into building a dragon for the first time. I thought it would be cool to make a small dragon that is roughly the size of the official molded dragon piece, yet much more pose-able. I was hoping you could give me some advice on how to do small, yet flexible creatures or maybe point me in the direction of someone who has attempted this size dragon before. Thanks.


Actually, I'm afraid I can't think of any builders off hand that have gone that scale. I mean, I've seen a few...but, they were quite poor in design and appearance.

Honestly, I think you're setting yourself up for a bit of a challenge. Orgainic forms - animals, plants, rocks, etc. - are tricky to achieve with Lego due to their non-linear forms. The smaller you go with such subjects, the more challenging it is to find convincing solutions. Having said that, however, when you DO succeed, the victory is all the sweeter! ;)

For this scale you'll probably need to stick with the smallest of parts options available. This more than likely means things like fig parts and utensils, 1 x 1 modified elements, hoses, levers, and the like. Anything that clips and/or fits into clips can be an option for joints, which will be important if mobility is an issue. Also remember that hoses can have some flexibility. They might be suitable as a starting point for body parts such as the neck or tail.

Finally, I will say that larger dragon designs are often very effective when the repetition of parts is used (same piece used multiple times in a visual rhythm). Might keep that in mind even though what you're looking to achieve is in a smaller form.

Hopefully that helps a little. Good luck with this one!

Permalink
| February 4, 2012, 6:54 am
 Group admin 
Quoting daevster !
Hey Mark,
I haven't posted any creations to this group yet, so I thought why not do it today finally? I would greatly appreciate it if you took a look at my Twilight Zone Tower of Terror from the Disney theme parks. My main goal with this MOC was the lighting effects, but I also wanted to create a good quality build.
Anyways, here it is. Thanks for your time!
http://mocpages.com/moc.php/306859

-daevster


Great stuff! The presentation was excellent, with crisp images, nice compositions, solid lighting, and good focal effects.

The build quality was just as sound, with some nice parts usage and texturing. My only nit might be the studs. I harp on studs all of the time, so I'll take this opportunity to explain why...

The rest of your build was very detailed, and had some excellent forms and textures. The book case, the walls, the chains, etc. all had a certain level of believability. But I felt the door and the flooring didn't reach that same level because of the studs. IMHO, a smoother surface for those elements would've better matched the level of the texturing in the rest of the MOC, and provided better overall consistency.

Anyway, aside from my zealous bias against the dredded stud, I thought this MOC was very nice, and reminded me somewhat of Alex Eylar's work...yes...that is a MAJOR compliment! ;)

Nice work!




Permalink
| February 4, 2012, 7:22 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Thanks for the kind words regarding Apocalypsis. I SO wish I could get back to that - the best part of the story is yet to come. But, life has just killed my build time for the last couple of years. (sheesh...YEARS. Not weeks, not months...years. *sigh*)

Anyway, on to your work...

LOTS of good stuff going on! I'm intrigued by the story line, for starters. Good cliff hanger, too, with them about to go through a door. Nothing like creating a mystery to bring people back!

I particularly liked the last section of that entry. I thought it outshined the first part on every level. The building was good, the camera angles were excellent, the lighting was sound, and you even had a nice close up in that section. Really nicely done.

As for the first sections, I have to admit that I felt like the lighting was a bit of a distraction. I'm assuming you are trying to eliminate all detail in the white background. But the "blowout" effect is very strong, and doesn't seem to really work with the environment or what's taking place in the story.

Sometimes the white blowout can be a very effective visual tool in creating a certain mood (the new BSG tv series comes to mind, just as an example. They used that to great effect quite a bit), but I'm not sure it's the best choice here.

I might suggest building some generic rock structures and trees that can be modular, and can make up a background for wooded scenes. Keep the camera's focus on the foreground, allowing the extras to go out of focus, and you can use those "backdrops" over and over again.

Also, I'm wondering if you might be able to achieve some really tight close ups. This is something I've used (ex. http://www.flickr.com/photos/22824835@N05/3856075476/in/set-72157622015454671), and it really adds another level to the visual drama. Just a thought.

Anyway, I'm really interested in seeing where things go from here. Could you do me a HUGE favor, and let me know somehow when the next installment comes along? Like a reminder? I'd like to follow your story, but I've got so many MOCs to look at each day, that I'm afraid it might get lost in the mix.

Keep up the great work!

Thanks Mark!
I'll keep everything mentioned up there in consideration during the next episode.
Also, I'm still refining my photo editing skills, so your comments on that are greatly appreciated , I'll keep it in mind.
And I'd be honored to share the next episode with you!
Permalink
| February 4, 2012, 1:34 pm
Hi, I hope this isn't off topic.
I usually build city stuff (mostly fire rescue), and am afraid that some people may find that sort of stuff 'Goofy' and 'Weird' . What are your thoughts on the theme I build in? If I were to post some of my custom clones (that I made a long time ago), do you think I would be slammed with "Clonetard!" comments? Thanks for your time!
Permalink
| February 5, 2012, 1:47 am
 Group admin 
Quoting ~~ Patrick~~ .
Hi Mark, Can I have some general advice on how I could make good future Castles Generally. Here is an example of one of my Castles: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/307675


I've been discovering lately, that really the best advice I can give has come in the way of examples. With that in mind, I'd highly recommend checking out more of these builder's works:

Luke Watkins: http://www.flickr.com/photos/45244184@N04/with/6227282747/

Daniel Z: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8220893@N02/

They both have unique styles, and are terrific castle builders. In particular, look at the detailing and depth variation of the walls. I think your work would improve quite nicely if you varied the depth of the walls, and provided some additional architectural detailing.

You're already doing some nice things with the angles of the structure - and, I'd recommend more of that. The landscaping is not too bad, either. Have a look at Luke's WIP pics with his landscaping - I think that might help immensely.

One thing you'll probably find is that volume of brick is an issue. But that will be something that you'll have to contend with over time. Meanwhile, I'd suggest actually trying to copy a wall or two from these builders to see if you can discover what tecniques they implemented. Once you have an understanding of those techniques, you can then apply them to your own needs. This is the way it's often done in art, too. We study the masters, try to learn their ways, and then use what we've learned to our own ends. And often alon the way, tricks and techniques will come from simply the act of practicing your craft.

Good luck!
Permalink
| February 6, 2012, 9:11 am
Hello, Mr. Kelso. I was thinking, since MOC Pages is 10 years old, we could have a MOC of the Decade group. A group that pinpoints the best MOC since 2002. We can have all sorts of categories like the MOCies. The best space MOC, THE BEST MOC, etc. Reply back, please. Actually, I think I'll just invite you.
Permalink
| February 6, 2012, 4:58 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Nicholas O.
Hi, I hope this isn't off topic.
I usually build city stuff (mostly fire rescue), and am afraid that some people may find that sort of stuff 'Goofy' and 'Weird' . What are your thoughts on the theme I build in? If I were to post some of my custom clones (that I made a long time ago), do you think I would be slammed with "Clonetard!" comments? Thanks for your time!


Hi, Nicholas -

I don't think any subject runs the risk of ridicule if it's done well. And city and fire rescue are VERY common subjects, anyway.

Members tend to react badly to poor quality in the creations, rather than in regards to the subjects portrayed. Which brings us to the customized fig topic...

A lot of builders customize - some stick with pure Lego in their alterations, while others go nuts with non-Lego additions. Any method is seems to be okay with most fans, as long as the work is solid. Have at look at these for example:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/morgan19/with/6293439571/

Note the quality of the building AND the presentation. Do something like that and I'm betting you'll get a lot of respect. But, do be careful when it comes to Clone Wars subjects. If the quality of the alterations is sound, I think you'll be okay. But, if we're talking poorly painted elements or...God help us all...use of Sharpies...then bury those figs deep underground and never let them seee the light of day. You'll thank me for it!

Permalink
| February 7, 2012, 8:49 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Will A.
Hello, Mr. Kelso. I was thinking, since MOC Pages is 10 years old, we could have a MOC of the Decade group. A group that pinpoints the best MOC since 2002. We can have all sorts of categories like the MOCies. The best space MOC, THE BEST MOC, etc. Reply back, please. Actually, I think I'll just invite you.


Actually that sounds pretty fun. Be cool to look back at some of the best and most influencial creations over the last decade!


Permalink
| February 7, 2012, 8:55 am
I know I have asked this question a lot, so I hope you'll forgive me for asking again. What do you think of the pictures in this moc?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308458
I think it is my best photography yet, especially considering I don't use photo editing.
Permalink
| February 8, 2012, 6:14 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Actually that sounds pretty fun. Be cool to look back at some of the best and most influencial creations over the last decade!


Ahhhhh!!!!! What was I thinking!!! I'm 11!!!! I can't handle it!!! Help me Kelso, you're my only hope. :)
Permalink
| February 8, 2012, 6:19 pm
Hey Mark!
So, I just posted a MOC and I would greatly appreciate some feedback. Thanks so much! It's really nice of you.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308562

Permalink
| February 9, 2012, 7:39 pm
Hello Mark!

Im new to lego i started collecting on june but i think that this creation is the only one of mine worth of being here on mocpages. Im really proud of it,
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308575
Permalink
| February 10, 2012, 7:23 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Ben King
I know I have asked this question a lot, so I hope you'll forgive me for asking again. What do you think of the pictures in this moc?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308458
I think it is my best photography yet, especially considering I don't use photo editing.


Not bad, Ben. I think without a photo-editor, you've done an excellent job. The whites of the background are very bright and clean, and that helps the presentation immensely.

Unfortunately, to achieve the bright whites, you have to sacrifice the darks in the images. That's where a photo-editing application would be helpful. You could then select particular areas of an image (basically the MOC itself), and bring it's black and white balance back to normal.

While I've got ya here, let me just say nice job on the presentation in general. I liked the base, and I thought the parts for both the boat and the water were pretty cool.

Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 5:51 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Not bad, Ben. I think without a photo-editor, you've done an excellent job. The whites of the background are very bright and clean, and that helps the presentation immensely.

Unfortunately, to achieve the bright whites, you have to sacrifice the darks in the images. That's where a photo-editing application would be helpful. You could then select particular areas of an image (basically the MOC itself), and bring it's black and white balance back to normal.

While I've got ya here, let me just say nice job on the presentation in general. I liked the base, and I thought the parts for both the boat and the water were pretty cool.

Thanks! Are there any free photo-editing programs you would suggest?
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 6:36 am
i have more of a question why dont all you moc pages mods and admins have a bionicle self moc i think it would be interesting to see that so... why dont you lack of bionicle bits...no desire please i would like to know
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 6:47 am
Quoting Leaith The Silent Knight
i have more of a question why dont all you moc pages mods and admins have a bionicle self moc

Because they may not HAVE or LIKE Bionicle.

Use your brain...
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 6:52 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Cory Johnson
Hey Mark!
So, I just posted a MOC and I would greatly appreciate some feedback. Thanks so much! It's really nice of you.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308562


Nice!

Right off the bat, the whole Po/Sheldon reference had me laughing. Really fun presentation.

On the build end of things, a lot of good stuff going on. To begin with, I thought the overall form was very cool. I especially like the way the lines of the shoulder section give it a feeling of mass.

There were also some nice color choices, and the hit of chrome was a cool touch, as well. In regards to the color, however, I felt like they might have been just a bit too "scattered." The general rule of thumb is to block your colors a bit more. And, while you don't necessarily want to just follow a formula on any given creation, I think with this particular MOC, color blocking would've have been a good option.

Something I might suggest for future mechs would be to try to work for more complex techniques that would hide the joints, as well as the studs and brick undersides. It's an issue of believability, which tends to be the underlying basis by which most MOCs are judged - the more detailed and life-like you can get with a creation, the more people tend to appreciate it (even with subjects that are totally absurd).

So, with a mech of this size, and with all that mass, I think you might need joints that feel more substantial to seem believable. And as for the studs and brick undersides, hopefully that's pretty self-explanatory.

Anyway, I really enjoyed this MOC and your presentation. I'd say shoot for greater detail and believability with the aesthetic, and you're golden.



Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 7:33 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Vohfur Serterun
Hello Mark!

Im new to lego i started collecting on june but i think that this creation is the only one of mine worth of being here on mocpages. Im really proud of it,
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308575


Yeah, I like the design of the shrine itself. I might suggest creating a base, however, that's either brick built with the studs facing sideways (or "out"), rather than up...or using tiles to cover the studs of the plate. That would make the surface of your base smoother, and create a cleaner look for the MOC.

Others already mentioned the notion of a cleaner background, and I agree whole-heartedly with that as well.

Still, a nice design. Keep up the good work!

Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 7:41 am
Quoting Legobob ~
Because they may not HAVE or LIKE Bionicle.

Use your brain...

this is not a question for you...
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 7:47 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Trevor Williamson
Can I get some feedback from you Kelso? Thanks if you do! http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308681


Hi, Trevor!

I think you did an excellent overall job with this. You pretty much nailed the proportions of the cartoon version (which is somewhat shorter and more "squat" than a real van). You also captured the color scheme quite nicely.

I think to take it to the next level, you would need to start getting more specific with your shapes. For example, the color work on the sides, while essentially accurate, is still a bit blocky. I might have played around with the use of some slopes and inverted slopes to get the blue and green "wave" pattern on the side looking a bit more fluid. And in the long run, if this had been an actual, physical MOC (vs. being digital), I might have even gone with some custom stickers for the flowers and Mystery Machine Logo on the sides.

But, again, for a smaller MOC, this is really fairly accurate and a solid build.

Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 7:51 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Ben King
Thanks! Are there any free photo-editing programs you would suggest?


GIMP, without hesitation. Do a quick search and you shouldn't have any trouble finding it.

Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 7:53 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Leaith The Silent Knight
i have more of a question why dont all you moc pages mods and admins have a bionicle self moc i think it would be interesting to see that so... why dont you lack of bionicle bits...no desire please i would like to know


I find Bionicle to be a very poor aesthetic, in general, and so don't use it much. I'll explain a bit here. And keep in mind that this is just my opinion - there are a lot of builders who love Bionicle, and I say more power to 'em. But for me...

Bionicle is essentially too visually busy. Each part, on its own, can be quite nice. But, when all of the parts - each with a multitude of surface details and textures - are put together, you get so much going on that the larger form starts to get lost amidst this chaotic amalgam of smaller forms. Personally, most Bionicle creations just look like a jumbled mess.

I will say that I LOVE Bionicle used sparingly. Kescenovitz and Mark Stafford - two examples that come to mind immediately - use Bionicle to great effect. And most advanced builders draw from every resource they can to achieve the greatest diversity of parts usage possible. But, Bionicle on it's own - just personally speaking - doesn't work real well.


Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 8:08 am
Quoting Leaith The Silent Knight
this is not a question for you...

O.o

I was just giving a response on the behalf of a Mod.

It's also called "Helping".
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 8:08 am
I'd appreciate it if you could give me advice on my latest MOC: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308783 It is my first attempt at SNOT. Thanks!
-LB Senior
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 3:47 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Yeah, I like the design of the shrine itself. I might suggest creating a base, however, that's either brick built with the studs facing sideways (or "out"), rather than up...or using tiles to cover the studs of the plate. That would make the surface of your base smoother, and create a cleaner look for the MOC.

Others already mentioned the notion of a cleaner background, and I agree whole-heartedly with that as well.

Still, a nice design. Keep up the good work!

Thanks a lot for giving me so good advices, i got the white cardboard finally. Im using the sideways idea, soon.
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 5:03 pm
Hullo!!!!! I was going to ask if you had any Ideas for what to do with a blue baseplate? I'm starting this series with 101 scenes built with 1 blue baseplate.
Permalink
| February 13, 2012, 5:13 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Lego Builders
I'd appreciate it if you could give me advice on my latest MOC: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/308783 It is my first attempt at SNOT. Thanks!
-LB Senior


As I mentioned in a comment, I really liked the sloping grass section. I thought that had a nice, natural feel to it. I'm also glad you decided to go SNOT for the water. We've got a few different methods out there right now for representing water. With this particular approach, you could add a few plates with lighter blues (if you have that color) near the shore line for addition detail. (like this: http://mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=57317&id=/user_images/5708/1210816960)

I also really liked the use of the supports in the entry way for some very unusual detailing. I'm wondering if there's something else you might have been able to incorporate into the wall design to give it some punch. Maybe it's the surface texture, or it might be the fact that the entire section is solid red, but I feel like it might be nice to break up that visual in some way...either with color or texture. Dunno, kind of "thinking out loud" here.

Anyway, a really nice little MOC with some solid parts usage. Keep up the good work!

Permalink
| February 14, 2012, 9:08 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Will A.
Hullo!!!!! I was going to ask if you had any Ideas for what to do with a blue baseplate? I'm starting this series with 101 scenes built with 1 blue baseplate.


Well, the options are practically limitless. But, I think it should be up to you to decide what to do with it - after all, the series is your idea. ;)

I can suggest to try thinking beyond the realms of what a baseplate normally does...which is to sit flat and be built upon. What if you did some things were it was a background? Or a ceiling? What if it was only one level of a larger creation?

Just try pushing the envelope a bit and I'm sure you'll come up with tons of ideas. I mean just using it as water is practically endless, but what else could it be?

THINK, MAN! THINK!!! :)



Permalink
| February 14, 2012, 9:15 am
 Group admin 
Okay, ladies and gentlemen...and Phipson...

I'm off on the road to madness this week with an art exhibition in Charleston, SC. While, I'm taking the laptop, my time and access to the internet will be very limited. So this is just an FYI kind of thing.

I may not be able to respond quickly (most of you are rolling your eyes right now going "Yeah, and how is that different!?"). But, I will respond. I'll be back to normal - or what I call normal, anyway - next Tuesday, the 21st.

Chris, my Mom will be with me, so you're out of luck there, but stay away from my sister while I'm gone!

Permalink
| February 14, 2012, 9:25 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
Okay, ladies and gentlemen...and Phipson...

I'm off on the road to madness this week with an art exhibition in Charleston, SC. While, I'm taking the laptop, my time and access to the internet will be very limited. So this is just an FYI kind of thing.

I may not be able to respond quickly (most of you are rolling your eyes right now going "Yeah, and how is that different!?"). But, I will respond. I'll be back to normal - or what I call normal, anyway - next Tuesday, the 21st.

Chris, my Mom will be with me, so you're out of luck there, but stay away from my sister while I'm gone!

Have fun! :)
Permalink
| February 14, 2012, 10:14 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

As I mentioned in a comment, I really liked the sloping grass section. I thought that had a nice, natural feel to it. I'm also glad you decided to go SNOT for the water. We've got a few different methods out there right now for representing water. With this particular approach, you could add a few plates with lighter blues (if you have that color) near the shore line for addition detail. (like this: http://mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=57317&id=/user_images/5708/1210816960)

I also really liked the use of the supports in the entry way for some very unusual detailing. I'm wondering if there's something else you might have been able to incorporate into the wall design to give it some punch. Maybe it's the surface texture, or it might be the fact that the entire section is solid red, but I feel like it might be nice to break up that visual in some way...either with color or texture. Dunno, kind of "thinking out loud" here.

Anyway, a really nice little MOC with some solid parts usage. Keep up the good work!


Thanks a bunch! I really appreciate it!
-LB Senior
Permalink
| February 14, 2012, 8:35 pm
Hello, Mr. Kelso. This isn't asking for advice, but I saw this MOC the other day and it made me maaaaad!!!! Ergh!! I was so angry!!! Do you think you could do some justice here?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/45523
Permalink
| February 15, 2012, 5:17 pm
Quoting Will A.
Hello, Mr. Kelso. This isn't asking for advice, but I saw this MOC the other day and it made me maaaaad!!!! Ergh!! I was so angry!!! Do you think you could do some justice here?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/45523


I don't Mr. Kelso can reason with him. The creator last MOC was posted in 2009 so it's likely that he is unactive.
Permalink
| February 17, 2012, 3:53 am
Quoting Will A.
Hello, Mr. Kelso. This isn't asking for advice, but I saw this MOC the other day and it made me maaaaad!!!! Ergh!! I was so angry!!! Do you think you could do some justice here?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/45523

Looks like he hit the mark squarely!
I'll have to take a closer look at that page when I'm a bit closer to my full capabilities.
Permalink
| February 17, 2012, 9:24 am
Hi Kelso, I would love to have some advice on this- http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310454 It's my first castle creation for a while, and I think my best MOC ever so far, so I would greatly appreciate some pointers. :)
Permalink
| February 20, 2012, 11:16 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Will A.
Hello, Mr. Kelso. This isn't asking for advice, but I saw this MOC the other day and it made me maaaaad!!!! Ergh!! I was so angry!!! Do you think you could do some justice here?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/45523


We've had a look at that already, and the decision was to allow it to stay. I agree that it's pushing the boundaries on MOCpages rules regarding "insulting comments" but we also had to weigh that against the right to personal expression. In another court the judgement might be different, but on that day we gave it the thumbs up.


Permalink
| February 21, 2012, 8:29 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Owen S.
Hi Kelso, I would love to have some advice on this- http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310454 It's my first castle creation for a while, and I think my best MOC ever so far, so I would greatly appreciate some pointers. :)


Nice little MOC, Owen! I like the base for starters. Adds to the cleanliness of the presentation. The level change is a sweet touch, as well, and the angles of the grass elements (hinged, I'm assuming) help to provide some variety. The curved bricks in the main rock element work for me. I don't recommend it too often, but every now and then it works - such is the case here.

I wonder if some green at the top of the largest rock might have been an option to consider? Also, I might have been tempted to place the tree just a tiny bit further from the center, for a more asymetrical composition. Putting it farther away from the large rock might have provided some counterbalance to the visual weight of the large rock.

All in all, though, a terrrific little build!


Permalink
| February 21, 2012, 11:30 am
I have been working on my dragon and have made some progress. It isn't nearly as flexible as I wanted but I enjoyed shaping the body around the central piece. I would appreciate any feedback you have. Especially on the legs. Here he is.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310786
Thanks!
Permalink
| February 22, 2012, 12:41 am
Could you review this and give advice: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310772

This stuff really helps :)
Permalink
| February 23, 2012, 9:52 am
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.

P.s What you think of this?http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/280690
Permalink
| February 23, 2012, 8:20 pm
 Group admin 

Quoting Sir Balamorgineas
I have been working on my dragon and have made some progress. It isn't nearly as flexible as I wanted but I enjoyed shaping the body around the central piece. I would appreciate any feedback you have. Especially on the legs. Here he is.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310786
Thanks!


Some nice stuff going on there. As I mentioned in a comment on the page, I thought the head was particularly nice. Great use of that single piece for the lower jaw. I also kind of liked the look of the repeated clips in the tail.

As for the legs, I think they might feel a bit boxy. They're short (as a result of the scale, as well as the kind of dragon you've designed; more squat than long). This makes parts options even more limited. I think I might have looked into an option, however, that created a taper in the other direction from what I'm seeing in your design. You've got the cheese slopes pointing downward (to represent scales, I assume), which is causing the form of the leg to expand as it moves farther from the joint. I might have gone with something that tapers instead, which is what you would be more likely to see in large reptilian/bird forms, especially in the rear legs (i.e. wider hip section, smaller fibula and tibia section).

The fact is, though, that there are so many options, I can't really suggest any one single solution. And my aesthetic goals could be very different from yours - so even if I recommended something that might have better functionality, it might not have the appearance you were going for. In general, I think your solution was solid for such a small scale.

Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 7:34 am
Quoting Stevie H
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.

I think you'll find that's because they're absolutely shameless in their quest for applause.
Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 7:54 am
 Group admin 
Quoting 12Lego Greendude
Could you review this and give advice: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/310772

This stuff really helps :)


I'm afraid I carry a bit of a negative bias towards Bionicle. I'll do my very best here to try and keep it in check, but just bear in mind that I tend to lean somewhat toward the critical side when seeing this type of Lego.

I think your proportions are fairly good, for starters. I might have gone with a slightly thicker torso, and a bit more length in the legs. Other than that, however, it's very accurate to a human profile.

I like your color choices as well. The gold and the black are really sharp contrasts. The dark green works for me, too, although I'd like to see a bit more of it. And perhaps the silver could be eliminated entirely. Actually, any three of the colors might have been nice, but four is starting to border on over-kill for me.

My biggest issue is the lack of discernable form (and this is where I have such a problem with Bionicle in general). From the front I can easily make out the features - that's a good thing. But, when the figure is turned to the side, it really just looks like a choatic assemblage of miscellaneous parts. I can't make out arms, legs, torso, etc. Each Bionicle piece is so full of textures (created by the holes, surface variations, etc.), that there's no room for the eye to rest. Every single section of the surface of the MOC is just crammed with visual activity. When that happens, it becomes difficult to make out larger forms. As an example, when his arms were crossed, I couldn't find them (at least, not immediately). So...

I might suggest looking into the use of some system parts, or a lot more plating for areas where you are trying to create mass - torso, shoulders, upper legs, etc. By reducing the busyness of the surface, you'll create areas that become one single element, rather than a multitude of smaller ones. And this will help to give the viewer a better sense of the general form.

It's kind of a same concept as advice that I give to space builders...some greebling is nice (even necessary) for good aesthetics, but too much causes visual chaos, and the overall form gets lost.

Whew...that's a lot to try to communicate. Hopefully, I've done a reasonable job of explaining it. Anyway, as I mentioned above, I think proportions and color work are quite nice. If you can find a way to solidify the mass and smooth out the texture, I think you'll be in great shape!

Cheers!

Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 8:00 am
Quoting Stevie H
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.



First of all, the people who are your age that have more likes,comments and faves, must have had an account before you and had an account for over a year. You seem to be new.

You can't just be popular in a short time like in one night!

But I'll give ya tips on getting what you want.

Tip 1:If you want to get lots of likes and faves, Make MOCs that people would impress, make the go "Wow, that's cool!". Don't make some boring creation.

How to build succesfully: Use a LARGE ammount of time to complete the build, find peices, etc. And not only just take a lot of time on it,- do your best to and be creative! Sure-this may seem hard, but it will pay off.

And also, use an interesting background/photo-studio

Tip 2: Make friends in this site! If you make friends, it's likely that they will comment on your newest creations.

Tip 3: Always take advice. If you take advice, you will improve and your level of building will raise.

Tip 4: Write on convos on groups, comment on other creations and be active! When your name appears on other MOCer's activity box, It's likely that they will visit your homepage.



Tip 5: Good photography. The veiwers must be able to see the MOC clearly in order to actually like it. Blurry pics ain't gonna help

Tip 6: Don't be rude,don't be so childish, don't break the rules-especially spamming (that's one big prob in this site).

That's all my tips for now.

~ Bluestar
Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 8:17 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Stevie H
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.

P.s What you think of this?http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/280690


Honestly, there are so many builders on MOCpages these days that it's very difficult to get noticed. My guess would be that other builders you're refering to have a circle of aquaintences that are mutually supporting one another...i.e. a "you comment on mine, and I'll comment on yours" kind of thing.

That's not a bad thing, necessarily, as such an arrangement creates interest and motivation to continue building. If you haven't tried this yet, I might suggest joining a few groups and asking what builders think of a recent creation. And by the way, while they might sound similar, there's a big difference between saying "please rate and comment" vs. "I'd like to get your thoughts." The former tells people you just want smileys, the latter tells us you sincerely are interested in feedback.

Meanwhile, I'd recommend commenting in a positive way on other's creations as often as you can (perhaps the very best way to get others to comment on your own work), and keeping any posts humorous when possible. It might sound strange, but people need to laugh. And when I know a builder is doing something fun, I tend to be more apt to visit their pages. Chris and I are very good examples of that. We really enjoy ourselves, and we make it fun for others to join in.

And as for the ship, I think you did a nice job in general. I might suggest looking into some SNOT techniques to achieve more accurate forms, and perhaps utilizing some parts that have curves and wedges. Eventually, if you can make your creations virtually stud-free, that will also really help in creating a clean and attractive MOC.

Hope these thoughts help!


Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 8:19 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Bluestar ~
Quoting Stevie H
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.



First of all, the people who are your age that have more likes,comments and faves, must have had an account before you and had an account for over a year. You seem to be new.

You can't just be popular in a short time like in one night!

But I'll give ya tips on getting what you want.

Tip 1:If you want to get lots of likes and faves, Make MOCs that people would impress, make the go "Wow, that's cool!". Don't make some boring creation.

How to build succesfully: Use a LARGE ammount of time to complete the build, find peices, etc. And not only just take a lot of time on it,- do your best to and be creative! Sure-this may seem hard, but it will pay off.

And also, use an interesting background/photo-studio

Tip 2: Make friends in this site! If you make friends, it's likely that they will comment on your newest creations.

Tip 3: Always take advice. If you take advice, you will improve and your level of building will raise.

Tip 4: Write on convos on groups, comment on other creations and be active! When your name appears on other MOCer's activity box, It's likely that they will comment.

Tip 5: Good photography. The veiwers must be able to see the MOC clearly in order to actually like it. Blurry pics ain't gonna help

Tip 6: Don't be rude,don't be so childish, don't break the rules-especially spamming (that's one big prob in this site).

That's all my tips for now.

~ Bluestar


All sound advice!

Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 8:21 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

All sound advice!

Yeah =P
Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 8:35 am

May I formally challenge you to a MOC-off? You are an incredible builder, and going against you may bring out my best work. The current creations that I have posted may not be extremely impressive, however this is due to the fact that I am still posting all creations from my post-MOC pages era. I made a group if you wish to accept my challenge, shown in the link below.
http://www.mocpages.com/group.php/19972

Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 6:15 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Honestly, there are so many builders on MOCpages these days that it's very difficult to get noticed. My guess would be that other builders you're refering to have a circle of aquaintences that are mutually supporting one another...i.e. a "you comment on mine, and I'll comment on yours" kind of thing.

That's not a bad thing, necessarily, as such an arrangement creates interest and motivation to continue building. If you haven't tried this yet, I might suggest joining a few groups and asking what builders think of a recent creation. And by the way, while they might sound similar, there's a big difference between saying "please rate and comment" vs. "I'd like to get your thoughts." The former tells people you just want smileys, the latter tells us you sincerely are interested in feedback.

Meanwhile, I'd recommend commenting in a positive way on other's creations as often as you can (perhaps the very best way to get others to comment on your own work), and keeping any posts humorous when possible. It might sound strange, but people need to laugh. And when I know a builder is doing something fun, I tend to be more apt to visit their pages. Chris and I are very good examples of that. We really enjoy ourselves, and we make it fun for others to join in.

And as for the ship, I think you did a nice job in general. I might suggest looking into some SNOT techniques to achieve more accurate forms, and perhaps utilizing some parts that have curves and wedges. Eventually, if you can make your creations virtually stud-free, that will also really help in creating a clean and attractive MOC.

Hope these thoughts help!


Thank you very much for this,I will be sure to follow your advice.
Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 7:16 pm
Quoting Bluestar ~
Quoting Stevie H
Hi, I just wanted to ask how come there aren't many people liking or commenting on my MOCs. Is it because I'm making MOCs of things no one really knows about? Should I make MOCs that everybody knows? I look at other people around my age, and they have tons of favs and comments and the like. Please give me your wise advice Mr.Kelso.



First of all, the people who are your age that have more likes,comments and faves, must have had an account before you and had an account for over a year. You seem to be new.

You can't just be popular in a short time like in one night!

But I'll give ya tips on getting what you want.

Tip 1:If you want to get lots of likes and faves, Make MOCs that people would impress, make the go "Wow, that's cool!". Don't make some boring creation.

How to build succesfully: Use a LARGE ammount of time to complete the build, find peices, etc. And not only just take a lot of time on it,- do your best to and be creative! Sure-this may seem hard, but it will pay off.

And also, use an interesting background/photo-studio

Tip 2: Make friends in this site! If you make friends, it's likely that they will comment on your newest creations.

Tip 3: Always take advice. If you take advice, you will improve and your level of building will raise.

Tip 4: Write on convos on groups, comment on other creations and be active! When your name appears on other MOCer's activity box, It's likely that they will visit your homepage.



Tip 5: Good photography. The veiwers must be able to see the MOC clearly in order to actually like it. Blurry pics ain't gonna help

Tip 6: Don't be rude,don't be so childish, don't break the rules-especially spamming (that's one big prob in this site).

That's all my tips for now.

~ Bluestar
Ok,thank you for this advice,I'll be sure to follow it.

Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 7:41 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso


Thanks for the encouragement and feedback. I appreciate you taking the time. I am glad you enjoyed the head. That is my favorite part too. Thanks again!
Permalink
| February 24, 2012, 9:02 pm
Hello. (again.) I have the same problem as Arnas at the top. I can't post the link right now. But could you give me some advice on how to improve my rock work? I built a little harbor scene for the 101 things to do with a blue baseplate series I mentioned earlier. Woo hoo, I'm on #2 by the way..... Anyways the rock work is defiantly lacking a whole lot of..... Stuff.
Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 1:24 am
Quoting Luke, Builder of the Awesome

May I formally challenge you to a MOC-off? You are an incredible builder, and going against you may bring out my best work. The current creations that I have posted may not be extremely impressive, however this is due to the fact that I am still posting all creations from my post-MOC pages era. I made a group if you wish to accept my challenge, shown in the link below.
http://www.mocpages.com/group.php/19972

AFOLs are always busy. I don't think Mr.Kelso will challenge you.
Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 1:52 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

I'm afraid I carry a bit of a negative bias towards Bionicle. I'll do my very best here to try and keep it in check, but just bear in mind that I tend to lean somewhat toward the critical side when seeing this type of Lego.

I think your proportions are fairly good, for starters. I might have gone with a slightly thicker torso, and a bit more length in the legs. Other than that, however, it's very accurate to a human profile.

I like your color choices as well. The gold and the black are really sharp contrasts. The dark green works for me, too, although I'd like to see a bit more of it. And perhaps the silver could be eliminated entirely. Actually, any three of the colors might have been nice, but four is starting to border on over-kill for me.

My biggest issue is the lack of discernable form (and this is where I have such a problem with Bionicle in general). From the front I can easily make out the features - that's a good thing. But, when the figure is turned to the side, it really just looks like a choatic assemblage of miscellaneous parts. I can't make out arms, legs, torso, etc. Each Bionicle piece is so full of textures (created by the holes, surface variations, etc.), that there's no room for the eye to rest. Every single section of the surface of the MOC is just crammed with visual activity. When that happens, it becomes difficult to make out larger forms. As an example, when his arms were crossed, I couldn't find them (at least, not immediately). So...

I might suggest looking into the use of some system parts, or a lot more plating for areas where you are trying to create mass - torso, shoulders, upper legs, etc. By reducing the busyness of the surface, you'll create areas that become one single element, rather than a multitude of smaller ones. And this will help to give the viewer a better sense of the general form.

It's kind of a same concept as advice that I give to space builders...some greebling is nice (even necessary) for good aesthetics, but too much causes visual chaos, and the overall form gets lost.

Whew...that's a lot to try to communicate. Hopefully, I've done a reasonable job of explaining it. Anyway, as I mentioned above, I think proportions and color work are quite nice. If you can find a way to solidify the mass and smooth out the texture, I think you'll be in great shape!

Cheers!


Thanks for the critique! Mr.Kelso you always help out with my stuff, thank you. Maybe I should ask a BIONICLE AFOL... (Yuri?)
Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 1:59 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Luke, Builder of the Awesome

May I formally challenge you to a MOC-off? You are an incredible builder, and going against you may bring out my best work. The current creations that I have posted may not be extremely impressive, however this is due to the fact that I am still posting all creations from my post-MOC pages era. I made a group if you wish to accept my challenge, shown in the link below.
http://www.mocpages.com/group.php/19972


Luke, I would SO love to be able to accept your challenge!!! It's been ages since I've been able to just sit and build something randomly, and that would be a great opportunity.

Unfortunately - and this is killing me to say it...I can't. *sigh*

I'm under the gun again with work, and my hobby time is extremely limited. Add to that a Lego convention in March (Brickworld Indy), moderation duties, and my participation in the judging with the MOCathalon, and there goes every single moment of my time.

I'd say let's just try again in a month or so, but then I'll be travelling with art shows...aaaaand once summer hits, I've been volunteered to completely redo our kitchen. So, there goes the summer. Sheesh! It's no wonder the Eye of Chaos is taking so #^@! long!

Anyway, Luke - thank you so much for the invitation to the MOC-off, but I regretfully have to decline.

Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 5:43 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Will A.
Hello. (again.) I have the same problem as Arnas at the top. I can't post the link right now. But could you give me some advice on how to improve my rock work? I built a little harbor scene for the 101 things to do with a blue baseplate series I mentioned earlier. Woo hoo, I'm on #2 by the way..... Anyways the rock work is defiantly lacking a whole lot of..... Stuff.


Hmm...well, there are a couple of ways builders are tackling rock work these days. The first is through a studs-up approach, utilizing a lot of slopes. This approach can be seen in a lot of castle creations, for example. I might suggest looking at several castle MOCs to see how you like the rock work. If you find one that really sings to you, have a close look and try copying the parts choices and building techniques.

The other method, which tends to work nicely for smaller MOCs is a studs out approach. This might be a nice choice for your Baseplate #2 creation. Brian Kescenovitz just recently posted a MOC with this type of building style...

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/309096

Again, if you like this method, I'd suggest just trying to emulate what he's done. I think you'll find that by doing this, you'll discover your own new ideas for creating shapes.

There is another direction that a few of us are playing with. And that is to combine the two approaches, and to throw in hinged sections as well. But that tends to require a large section of rock, and may be a bit complex for your needs.


Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 6:01 am
Group moderators have locked this conversation.
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