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Ask Smelso...
 Group admin 
...er, I mean KELSO...sheesh, can't even spell my own name!

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:46 am
 Group admin 
So, this kinda got the ball rolling in my last thread...

Quoting cj cutrone9 :----:
Mr. Kelso, What is your favorite brick built spaceship?

Your favorite that you made and your favorite one that you didn't make.


Quoting Mark Kelso :----:
For my own work, that's an easy one...my Cylon Raider. Not the largest of what I've built, but DEFINITELY the best quality.

As for other's work, that's NOT so easy. In fact, it's down right impossible to say. Here are my top five, though. Once you get to this level, it's tough to argue that one is better than another - each is just a masterpiece of ABSexy...

Erik Varszegi - Venator: IMHO, possibly THE finest ship ever built, and a huge influence on my own work. http://www.fbtb.net/features/interview-erik-varszegi/

Daniel Jassim - Dragonstar: Very "old school" looking these days (goes to show how fast building techniques have changed), but one of my first experiences with Lego ships, and a major player in the history of Lego ship building.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/678

Thomas Benedikt - Mon Calamari: Again, my opinion only, but if Varszegi's ain't the best, then this one IS! (at least until he's finished with his most recent project)
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/105030

Rob Dasnewten - Naganata: This is mostly about a "style" of building. Pick anything of Rob's, really. Not a big ship, of course, but STUNNING color, PU, and design.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dasnewten/2819836597/

2 x 4 - Viper: This is the Viper from the original Battlestar Galactica. Why is something so small potentially my favorite ship of all time...because it's done just THAT well! It's really the result of numerous builders perfecting methods of PU and techniques, but 2 x 4 put it all together in this masterpiece. I'll say the same of my own Cylon Raider - this Viper is perfection, and I defy anyone to do it better!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/-2x4-/4534119753/in/faves-22824835@N05/



cj then mentioned a few others, and Yuri Fassio linked to a ship of Nathan Proudloves...all of which were really cool.

So, I thought it'd be fun to see what others thought of as really great examples of space ship work.

If anyone's got some links to post here of MOCs they think are really smoking good ships, fire away. And feel free to comment anyone, and everyone.

I'll start off with a couple others that just blew my mind when first seeing them...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/yoderism/2213955643/in/faves-30918813@N04/ - Unfortunately, Keith's stuff got deleted, and recovery - including this one - is uncertain, but even in this shot (thanks to Mike Yoder), you can see it's a GREAT work.

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/23078 - Another masterpiece from Thomas Benedikt.

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/56639 - There's a REASON why this is his number one MOC of all time!


Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:49 am
Any advice on taking large mocs long distances(as in California to Illinois)? I'm planning to go to Brickworld, and I'm bringing with me a large build. I've already got it sectionalized to fit in a suitcase, But how should I go about packing it?
Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 11:11 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Andrew Somers
Any advice on taking large mocs long distances(as in California to Illinois)? I'm planning to go to Brickworld, and I'm bringing with me a large build. I've already got it sectionalized to fit in a suitcase, But how should I go about packing it?


Yeah, absolutely!

Stretch film is a great way to keep your MOCs in tact. You can find it at hardware stores. It just wraps tightly around the model creating mild pressure to keep the bricks in place. The only down side to it is if you have delicate elements protruding out from the main body of the MOC (like antennas, radars, etc.) Once the film is around it, you can add additional protection by placing it within foam peanuts.

Another option, if your work is too delicate for stretch film and the suitcase, would be to house it in a cardboard box, in it's upright postion. I do this for my space ships (which are EXTREMELY delicate) and include the following protective measures...

1) cut and place a piece of carpet padding inside the box (make it the exact size of the boxes bottom).

2) on top of the padding, place one or two additional pieces of cardboard as a "floor" for the model to rest on.

3) secure a base plate to the cardboard with packing tape (don't use duct tape - the sticky part will transfer to the plastic).

4) build support structures out of spare Lego to hold the MOC in place in all four lateral directions. (When I say all four lateral directions, I mean so it won't move if the car turns right or left, or if the car starts or stops suddenly.)

5) If necessary, use packing tape to secure the MOC to the floor and brick-built supports. In my case, gravity hold the MOCs down, but you might need the tape for good measure.

Follow those steps and it should do VERY well in car travel.

I recently exhibited my work, including the Eye of Chaos WIP, using those measures, and didn't loose a single piece in a batch of MOCs that probably had 30,000+ pieces...not bad!

Good luck!

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 1:44 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso
Follow those steps and it should do VERY well in car travel.

Yeah... Forgot to mention my medium of transportation was an airplane... Though the wrapping does seem like a good idea for both means of transportation. I'll look into that.
Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 3:35 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Andrew Somers
Quoting Mark Kelso
Follow those steps and it should do VERY well in car travel.

Yeah... Forgot to mention my medium of transportation was an airplane... Though the wrapping does seem like a good idea for both means of transportation. I'll look into that.


In that case I'd start with stretch film, then put that in a sealed bag (to hold any parts that come off. Finally place that in a container with foam peanuts.

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:20 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso
In that case I'd start with stretch film, then put that in a sealed bag (to hold any parts that come off. Finally place that in a container with foam peanuts.
Very well then. Thank you. (Sorry that you had to type up that whole list because of my forgetfulness.)

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 11:40 pm
Do you know of any way to provide a fog effect without the use of photoshop? Preferably using bricks.
Permalink
| April 5, 2011, 4:20 pm
Hi, if I build a starship that's mostly white would you suggest a white, blue or black background?
Permalink
| April 8, 2011, 10:35 am
w00t! I finished my Greyscale Sopwith Camel V.2!

It looks so much better. Hopefully I get that, and HMSS Phipson posted soon!
Permalink
| April 8, 2011, 6:14 pm
Quoting tony hafner
Just out of curiosity does anyone know the reason Kieth Goldman left mocpages? Its such a shame not having him around.

Tony. H

I think he left because of a lack of respect from certain members of MOCpages.

He is back though so that's a relief.
Permalink
| April 10, 2011, 1:13 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Lt. John Harland
Do you know of any way to provide a fog effect without the use of photoshop? Preferably using bricks.


Actually...no. I have to say, there aren't too many things that Lego can't mimic to some degree, but fog or mist is going to be a really tough one. The reason is that such a subject is just insanely soft. It doesn't just have soft edges, but is also halfway between opaque and transparent. And around it's borders, it slowly dissaptes into nothingness - hard to mimic, indeed!

There are photo tricks you can use to mimic fog or mist, but as far as brick work is concerned, that one's got me stumped. I'd love to see someone come up with a clever solution, though.

As for photo-trickery. I might suggest playing around with a wall of transparent clears place very close to the camera lens. Keep the lens focused on your subject matter, and adjust the distnace of the clears until you get the right effect. The closer something is to a lens, the more out-of-focus it becomes, until it appears almost transparent. You might have some luck trying that.

Let me know if it works or not...I'm curious.


Permalink
| April 11, 2011, 9:58 am
 Group admin 
Quoting LukeClarenceVan The Revanchist
Hi, if I build a starship that's mostly white would you suggest a white, blue or black background?


Of those three choices, I'd say blue or black. It will, of course, mostly disappear against a similar color or value.

Black - which I like to use - can, however create very high contrasts, which cameras some times have a hard time dealing with. If grey is an option, I might recommend considering that as well. It would be very nuetral in coloration, and it's value should be a bit darker than the white, without being so dark that the contrast runs the risk of being too stark.

Let me just say, however, that if you DON'T get too carried away with your whites being really bright (or too "hot" as some people say)- then black can be an excellent background choice, in my opinion.

Permalink
| April 11, 2011, 10:03 am
 Group admin 
Quoting tony hafner
Just out of curiosity does anyone know the reason Kieth Goldman left mocpages? Its such a shame not having him around.

Tony. H



I do know a bit about the reasons, but I think out of respect for Keith, and others involved, I won't say too much about it here. As mentioned above, however, he has a new account and his work is being restored to MOCpages, which I'm glad to see. It's not under ideal circumstances, but at least it's available to us all once again.
Permalink
| April 11, 2011, 10:11 am
 Group admin 
Quoting space guy
i cant get any comments the most i have is 3! can you help me


I know it can be tough to get comments (especially when starting out), but these are the tips I usually suggest when people ask about getting ILI's and comments...

1) Good presentation - not just a sheet behind the MOC, but a clean solid background. Also make your shots in focus and well color and value balanced. It makes even a mediocre MOC look like a million bucks!

2) Get involved - Post to groups and comment on others MOCs as much as possible, and you'll find they remember you, and post on your pages as well.

3) Stay the course - don't get discouraged if it doesn't happen immediately. Just keep building, posting, commenting, and you'll see an eventual increase in ILI's and comments. But, it'll never happen if you aren't consistent or give up after a little while. ;)


Good luck!

Permalink
| April 11, 2011, 10:18 am
Hey Mark. :D.

So, while I should be buying LEGO, I've been buying 54mm Painted, metal WWI figurines. I also bought an Adrian helmet. :P Even though I should have bought LEGO, but whatever.

So, I was wondering what you think of these pictures I took of "Albert", my fig. Even though it's not LEGO related, but I thought you might be interested.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthew_novosad/sets/72157626542930112/
Permalink
| April 21, 2011, 11:44 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
Hey Mark. :D.

So, while I should be buying LEGO, I've been buying 54mm Painted, metal WWI figurines. I also bought an Adrian helmet. :P Even though I should have bought LEGO, but whatever.

So, I was wondering what you think of these pictures I took of "Albert", my fig. Even though it's not LEGO related, but I thought you might be interested.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthew_novosad/sets/72157626542930112/


*starts making cheesy, psuedo-computational bleeps and blurps*...

*spits out small piece of paper that reads...*

"Not Lego...Does not compute."


Permalink
| April 24, 2011, 7:56 am
 Group admin 
Okay, okay...had to get that joke in there.

Actually that figure's pretty sweet. Great attention to detail on the gun and jacket. Did I see you mention it was about twenty bucks? Now I don't feel so bad about what I've spent on minifigs. ;)


Permalink
| April 24, 2011, 7:58 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
Okay, okay...had to get that joke in there.

Actually that figure's pretty sweet. Great attention to detail on the gun and jacket. Did I see you mention it was about twenty bucks? Now I don't feel so bad about what I've spent on minifigs. ;)


Thanks!

Yeah 20 bucks, that particular one goes for 28 bucks on their website. They have some nice ones though, I have an order in mind, $86 for 6 of them. Anyway, back to LEGO! And that joke made me lol :D
Permalink
| April 24, 2011, 11:41 am
Hi Kelso! I have made a MOC for a badge at my scout group and one of my requirements for the badge (besides actually building the thing) was to get some feedback. All I've got so far is a load of positive but useless comments that, while being nice and reassuring that I did good are not very helpful feedback. So I came here. I would really appreciate it if I could have some constructive criticism on it. Here is the link: http://mocpages.com/moc.php/262877 . For those who don't want to look at the link, the MOC is a technic transformer that transforms. It is about two ft tall/long.

Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 3:39 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Little Ewok
Hi Kelso! I have made a MOC for a badge at my scout group and one of my requirements for the badge (besides actually building the thing) was to get some feedback. All I've got so far is a load of positive but useless comments that, while being nice and reassuring that I did good are not very helpful feedback. So I came here. I would really appreciate it if I could have some constructive criticism on it. Here is the link: http://mocpages.com/moc.php/262877 . For those who don't want to look at the link, the MOC is a technic transformer that transforms. It is about two ft tall/long.


Alright, dude...nice work, to begin with. Any time someone can create a piece that transforms from one identity to another, I'm impressed.

I think you did a very good job with the color blocking and general form/proportions. I also think if you were to try this again in the future, I might suggest shooting for more detail, and perhaps even start eliminating the studs to capture some textural effects to the exposed surface area. That is always a matter of taste, but I really like seeing a MOC done with few or no studs showing - a lot more difficult, and parts intensive, but almost always worth it.

I thought your presentation was really nice, as well. The video was excellent, with some nice fades, wipes, and minor effects. The close-up moments had the image shifting in and out of focus, though, and I wondered if even using a tripod might work a little better...dunno, just a thought. Still, you did a good job of covering all of the elements of the MOC, and that's the key.

I'd say in general that you did a great job with the work. If I had a single critisism, or piece of advice, I think it would be to just work for more complexity and detail in your creations to keep pushing for more realism/believability.

Hope some of that rambling was helpful!




Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 8:06 am
Must they be SHIPs? Or ships?
Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 8:59 am
 Group admin 
Quoting A Monkey
Must they be SHIPs? Or ships?


I'm sorry, but I'm not sure what you're referring to?
Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 1:16 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

I'm sorry, but I'm not sure what you're referring to?

An attempt at a joke. Keyword: attempt.
Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 1:40 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting A Monkey
An attempt at a joke. Keyword: attempt.


Ah, gotcha. Okay, okay...I'm with you now...I'm just a little...

um...

a little...

um...

slow. That's all.

Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 10:17 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

It was a bad joke.
Permalink
| April 25, 2011, 10:22 pm
Hey mr. Smelso, can *I*, Hun-grr, get advice on how to get more people to my page? For I must rule MOCpages, MUHAHAHAHA! Uh... so yeah, I can haz advice?
Permalink
| April 26, 2011, 12:04 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Hun-grr Terrorcon
Hey mr. Smelso, can *I*, Hun-grr, get advice on how to get more people to my page? For I must rule MOCpages, MUHAHAHAHA! Uh... so yeah, I can haz advice?


Build MOCs that are CRAZY-azz, godlike, stunmazingly fantabulous. Present them well, and be a fun and active member of the community. Or you could just bribe everyone. But, most can't afford that option, so I'd go with the first one. ;)

I mean, it sounds like I'm joking, but I'm actually quite serious. There isn't a magic trick to getting a lot of ILI's. It just boils down to what you'd excpect...if you do really good work and are a friendly and active member, then you get a lot of positive feedback. Kind of like life - you get out of it what ya put into it, right?

So go build something that's gonna knock our socks off, and when you are the supreme ruler of all MOCpages, I'll be able to say "I knew him when..." ;)

Good luck!
Permalink
| April 27, 2011, 7:44 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
It just boils down to what you'd excpect...if you do really good work and are a friendly and active member, then you get a lot of positive feedback. Kind of like life - you get out of it what ya put into it, right?

Or not. There's a lot of excellent builders who nobody's ever heard of on here.

Chances are, some spamkiddie with a page full of execrable clone wars stuff will get more attention.
Permalink
| April 27, 2011, 7:51 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
Quoting Mark Kelso
It just boils down to what you'd excpect...if you do really good work and are a friendly and active member, then you get a lot of positive feedback. Kind of like life - you get out of it what ya put into it, right?

Or not. There's a lot of excellent builders who nobody's ever heard of on here.

Chances are, some spamkiddie with a page full of execrable clone wars stuff will get more attention.


Great building is only a part of the formula, though. As I mentioned, you also need to interact on a regular basis, leaving feedback for others, participating in groups, etc.

But the goal shouldn't even BE seeing how many ILI's you get. That just leads to competition, spamming, yadda, yadda. Focus on using MOCpages for what it was designed for - sharing creations and Lego-oriented discussion - and, at least I personally think, you'll get the most out of it.

Permalink
| April 27, 2011, 5:33 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso
...er, I mean KELSO...sheesh, can't even spell my own name!
Hey Kelso do you know how to put videos from you tube and put them on your homepage, also do you like Fallout?.

Permalink
| April 28, 2011, 2:16 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Glenn streeter
Quoting Mark Kelso
...er, I mean KELSO...sheesh, can't even spell my own name!
Hey Kelso do you know how to put videos from you tube and put them on your homepage, also do you like Fallout?.


Hola! I've not done it myself, but there's a tutorial on embedding video here:

http://mocpages.com/help/

Look under "creating pages."

Fallout? Never played it (assuming you're referencing the game), although I've seen the premise, which is interesting...if not a bit depressing. But, in my world there's only time for a couple of hobbies, and Lego and martial arts are all I've got time for, unfortunately. *sigh* So many good games...so little time.



Permalink
| April 29, 2011, 7:58 am
My brickfair exhibit, I need all the advicew I can get.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5708884102/in/photostream/
Permalink
| May 11, 2011, 6:33 am
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
My brickfair exhibit, I need all the advicew I can get.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5708884102/in/photostream/


Looks like you're off to a good start. Here is one thought that comes to mind...

While the color placement works great, the layout is very blocky at the moment. I might suggest trying to come up with an element or two that has a unique angle to it - a building, in particular, set at an angle would really add a nice touch. Another way to break up that blocky pattern is to add some variety of form to the colors used for the ground...

...for example, instead of only a plate as a block of color on the ground (which is just a rectangle), add some 1 x 1, 1 x 2 or 1 x 3 plates around the border to make that color area more asymmetrical. You can also vary the height of the ground a bit, and definitely very the height of the buildings.

Lego is made up of blocky forms (duh!) that create immediate geometric patterns and repeating visual rhythms. When I see really good Lego creations, more often than not, the builder has managed to break that sense of uniformity in some way or another. By doing that, the MOC tends to feel more believable and natural (because in the real world, most things - even man made elements - aren't uniform). You don't have to go overboard, but if you can include a few things with angles or some variation from pattern, I think it will help.

I think the other thing that I might suggest, since it looks like you've got a fair bit of space to work with, is to give a few areas of the MOC some "breathing room" when any figs, vehicles, etc. come into the picture. Compositions work well when there are areas of focus (usually points where the most activity is taking place) and other areas where the eye kind of relaxes. I see a lot of dios where there is SO much going on EVERYWHERE, that the whole composition ends up looking too busy, and the effect is ruined. Even if you're planning a battle scene - which is, of course, very chaotic - I'd say still try to create areas where there is less going on, and a few places where there is a lot more visual interest.

Hope this babble was a little helpful. Good luck with the project!

Permalink
| May 11, 2011, 7:46 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Looks like you're off to a good start. Here is one thought that comes to mind...

While the color placement works great, the layout is very blocky at the moment. I might suggest trying to come up with an element or two that has a unique angle to it - a building, in particular, set at an angle would really add a nice touch. Another way to break up that blocky pattern is to add some variety of form to the colors used for the ground...

...for example, instead of only a plate as a block of color on the ground (which is just a rectangle), add some 1 x 1, 1 x 2 or 1 x 3 plates around the border to make that color area more asymmetrical. You can also vary the height of the ground a bit, and definitely very the height of the buildings.

Lego is made up of blocky forms that create immediate geometric patterns and repeating visual rhythms. When I see really good Lego creations, more often than not, the builder has managed to break that sense of uniformity in some way or another. By doing that, the MOC tends to feel more believable and natural (because in the real world, most things - even man made elements - aren't uniform). You don't have to go overboard, but if you can include a few things with angles or some variation from pattern, I think it will help.

I think the other thing that I might suggest, since it looks like you've got a fair bit of space to work with, is to give a few areas of the MOC some "breathing room" when any figs, vehicles, etc. come into the picture. Compositions work well when there are areas of focus (usually points where the most activity is taking place) and other areas where the eye kind of relaxes. I see a lot of dios where there is SO much going on EVERYWHERE, that the whole composition ends up looking too busy, and the effect is ruined. Even if you're planning a battle scene - which is, of course, very chaotic - I'd say still try to create areas where there is less going on, and a few places where there is a lot more visual interest.

Hope this babble was a little helpful. Good luck with the project!

Thankyou Sooooo Much Mr. Kelso, I now have some form of respect for you as a builder! Excpect some more questions about this in the future
Permalink
| May 11, 2011, 2:41 pm
Hey Mark! Remember that project of mine, the H.M.S.S Phipson? Well, it's done! I uploaded one unofficial shot to Flickr, here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthew_novosad/5711049043/

Came out pretty grainy, but the official pictures won't be :D.
Permalink
| May 11, 2011, 6:45 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
Thankyou Sooooo Much Mr. Kelso, I now have some form of respect for you as a builder! Excpect some more questions about this in the future


Any time, Luke! Looking forward to seeing what you do with this one, and if you ever want more input, just fire away with any questions.

Good luck with it!

Permalink
| May 12, 2011, 8:56 am
It's that time of day again Mr. Kelso!

WIP 2 is here!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5714070231/

I tried to take your first advice, but I gotta wait till I get some money for a BL order.
Permalink
| May 12, 2011, 7:54 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
Hey Mark! Remember that project of mine, the H.M.S.S Phipson? Well, it's done! I uploaded one unofficial shot to Flickr, here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthew_novosad/5711049043/

Came out pretty grainy, but the official pictures won't be :D.


I can see you put a lot of detail into this one. I particularly like the front section with the grill slope, and the parts usage on central guns.

I'd have liked to have seen a bit more attention to the underside, but maybe that's something you can shoot for in future works.

I feel bad for you, though. I mean you put all of this work into your ship, but with a name like Phipson...it's DOOMED!!!!! ;)

Permalink
| May 13, 2011, 7:56 am
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
It's that time of day again Mr. Kelso!

WIP 2 is here!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5714070231/

I tried to take your first advice, but I gotta wait till I get some money for a BL order.


Ha! I like it better already. I see you've got some action going on now, as well - right on!

I hear ya on the BL order. Never enough parts, and never enough money to order more parts. And it doesn't matter how many parts you have, or how much money...IT'S STILL NEVER ENOUGH!!!!!



Permalink
| May 13, 2011, 8:03 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

I can see you put a lot of detail into this one. I particularly like the front section with the grill slope, and the parts usage on central guns.

I'd have liked to have seen a bit more attention to the underside, but maybe that's something you can shoot for in future works.

I feel bad for you, though. I mean you put all of this work into your ship, but with a name like Phipson...it's DOOMED!!!!! ;)

Yeah, the front is definitely favorite part.

I agree, the bottom DOES need work. I'm definitely going to shoot for a V.2, a sister (Or brother), which brings me to my next point.

THE H.M.S.S KELSO! :D.
Permalink
| May 13, 2011, 3:33 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Mark Kelso
I feel bad for you, though. I mean you put all of this work into your ship, but with a name like Phipson...it's DOOMED!!!!! ;)


Hey, I heard that!
Permalink
| May 13, 2011, 4:17 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
Yeah, the front is definitely favorite part.

I agree, the bottom DOES need work. I'm definitely going to shoot for a V.2, a sister (Or brother), which brings me to my next point.

THE H.M.S.S KELSO! :D.


Oh no! Double-Doomed!!!!!
Permalink
| May 14, 2011, 11:45 am
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