MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop MOCpages Advice
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
Conversation »
Thank you for choosing Kelsopedia, can I help you?
 Group admin 
Quoting Country Biscuit
Do you only accept advice on real LEGO, or do you accept LDD as well? Cause I'm making a huge model in LDD. (not enough pieces in real LEGO) I have to know before I post a WIP of my model.


Sure, I'll be glad to have a look at any work - real life, or virtual. Bring it on!

Permalink
| March 9, 2011, 8:08 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Mark Kelso
Sure, I'll be glad to have a look at any work - real life, or virtual.


That also applies to women over 18...you know...in case anyone's offering.

Permalink
| March 9, 2011, 8:10 am
Boy, this really burns me up. A great WW2 builder http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/226842 had his picture stolen by a naughty kid http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/252569#reviews Please remove this little thief.
Permalink
| March 10, 2011, 9:50 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Mudskipper 4
Boy, this really burns me up. A great WW2 builder http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/226842 had his picture stolen by a naughty kid http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/252569#reviews Please remove this little thief.


Thanks, Mudskipper. The builder's post has been deleted and his name placed on a list of offenders. Hopefully it was just a mistake (not knowing this kind of thing to be against MOCpages policy) and won't happen again. But if he continues, we'll have a record, and can return to it if a ban becomes necessary.

Permalink
| March 10, 2011, 12:25 pm
Okay, I'm here! Any advice on my Asian garden?
Permalink
| March 10, 2011, 12:27 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Thanks, Mudskipper. The builder's post has been deleted and his name placed on a list of offenders. Hopefully it was just a mistake (not knowing this kind of thing to be against MOCpages policy) and won't happen again. But if he continues, we'll have a record, and can return to it if a ban becomes necessary.

Thanks for your quick action. I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and hope it was a mistake.
Permalink
| March 11, 2011, 12:41 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Brickster ~
Okay, I'm here! Any advice on my Asian garden?


Yeah, just a couple of thoughts. For starters, keep in mind we're getting down to the nit-pickin' here. You're building skills are already smoking good, and you've obviously also got the eye of an artist with your compositions and your color work. So what I'm tossing at ya is very much personal opinion - the build is killer as is. Okay...

I was wondering if you'd thought about setting the building at an angle? I think doing that could add a more natural feel to the whole dio and take the build to that "next level." Brian Kescenovitz and I have talked about the fact that much advanced Lego building is about getting the subject as believable as possible, and escaping the the patterns and rhythms that are so common with Lego (i.e. the parallel and perpendicular straight lines, the rhythmic spacing, etc.)

The other thing I was wondering about, was how the structure might look if it were sitting up higher a bit. Again, getting into some more advanced concepts, I thought maybe some additional height variation might provide some visual interest when the work is viewed in first person. Of course, we can't move around and see it from multiple angles on line (unless video is used), but I often try to think of works being viewed from all angles, and strive to capture nice compositions from many angles.

Just a couple thoughts. Meanwhile, I've rectified the egregious error of not having you on my favorites list, and I'll look forward to seeing any new work you do. Great stuff!

Permalink
| March 11, 2011, 12:21 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Country Biscuit
Here is the LDD W.I.P. Kelso. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/257109 Not much is done, but it will soon be more done.


Looks like a great subject to work on. I think the proportions and parts selections for the foot are good calls.

Not a lot to critisize or comment on at this point, but I wish you luck in the build. I'm curious, how tall are you looking at the MOC being if it were actually translated to brick?

Permalink
| March 11, 2011, 12:28 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Yeah, just a couple of thoughts. For starters, keep in mind we're getting down to the nit-pickin' here. You're building skills are already smoking good, and you've obviously also got the eye of an artist with your compositions and your color work. So what I'm tossing at ya is very much personal opinion - the build is killer as is. Okay...

I was wondering if you'd thought about setting the building at an angle? I think doing that could add a more natural feel to the whole dio and take the build to that "next level." Brian Kescenovitz and I have talked about the fact that much advanced Lego building is about getting the subject as believable as possible, and escaping the the patterns and rhythms that are so common with Lego (i.e. the parallel and perpendicular straight lines, the rhythmic spacing, etc.)

The other thing I was wondering about, was how the structure might look if it were sitting up higher a bit. Again, getting into some more advanced concepts, I thought maybe some additional height variation might provide some visual interest when the work is viewed in first person. Of course, we can't move around and see it from multiple angles on line (unless video is used), but I often try to think of works being viewed from all angles, and strive to capture nice compositions from many angles.

Just a couple thoughts. Meanwhile, I've rectified the egregious error of not having you on my favorites list, and I'll look forward to seeing any new work you do. Great stuff!

I raised the pavilion and made the water blend with the ground a little better. Anything else I should do?
Permalink
| March 12, 2011, 1:03 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Dominick S
Hey Mark. It's been quite a while since I've last needed help. *Insert Jaws opening theme here* I'm baaack. Forced perspective. Gotta love it! Any suggestions. And why aren't you in the MOCA's?


I knew there was a reason I was afraid of the water!

Forced perspective - My best bit of advice on that is to try to think outside the box. Don't just go with the usual city skyline or distant mountains scene, but try to come up with some unique concepts or perspectives. Reverse the perspective (something looking bigger up close vs smaller in the distance), or do a perspective from overhead looking down (guy looking over a stair railing), or something. Just try to make it unique in addition to an effective illusion and you'll score well.

As for not participating in the MOCathalon, I've unfortunately got bigger fish to fry right now. We just put our house up for sale as of today, so I've been busting azz getting our house ready. I'm also involved with Brick World Indy, which is next week. On top of that, I'm looking at going back to college for a new degree...so yeah...it's been nuts round here and doesn't look to ease up any time soon. Figures - right when I'm in the middle of a big SHIP build *sigh*, but such is life.

Anyway, good luck with the perspective build!

Permalink
| March 13, 2011, 8:40 pm
Who is cooler... You or Chris? And how should your all of your title's go? Is Supreme Lord Kelso before or after God Of Lego Mark?
Permalink
| March 13, 2011, 8:47 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting A Monkey
Who is cooler... You or Chris? And how should your all of your title's go? Is Supreme Lord Kelso before or after God Of Lego Mark?


Chris is the cool one. I'm the nerd who goes to band camp and sits with fat chicks at the lunch table.

Those titles would both be great and probably on about the same level, but mostly people just call me...oh, wait...can't say those words here!

Permalink
| March 13, 2011, 10:31 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Brickster ~
I raised the pavilion and made the water blend with the ground a little better. Anything else I should do?


Not a thing, amigo. As I mentioned before, some really nice work already! Oh, wait...yeah...one other thing. Get started on your next build.

Life's got me so busy that I can't build for myself right now, and have to live vicariously through all of you. So, I'm anxious to see more good work! Keep it up!

Permalink
| March 13, 2011, 10:37 pm
Okay, I have found my inner inspiration from looking at other builders. But now that I have ideas, I need advice on building them. here's some links:

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/257759

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/254127

I am currently working on a train station that I could give you a link to if you want. I think my main problems is vehicles so if you want to give me advice on that it would be great! Plus, any other advice would also be Fantabulously Scrumdillyumptous.
Permalink
| March 15, 2011, 5:10 pm
"My knowledge of life is limited to death..."

~ Paul Baumer

All quiet on the Western Front.

Just a quote I wanted to share with you. Lately I also have not had much time to build or take pictures of things already built, so in my spare time I've been playing Pokemon and watching All quiet on the Western Front. A good movie, it really hits you hard. That quote especially. If you haven't seen either version (Original 1930 which can be veined online, or the 1979 remake). The remake is much more watchable, but the original just comes out on top. They are really inspiring me for my WWI stuff. Just wanted you ponder on this quote though.

Permalink
| March 15, 2011, 6:39 pm
Im having problems with backgrounds. And lighting.

I need a sort of dark grey background like you see those people use with their costume minifigures on flickr, but I don't know if thats fabric or paper. I also need a lamp for taking the pictures, but I don't know which one will do the job. Please help if you get the time.
Permalink
| March 15, 2011, 10:11 pm
Quoting Manqué (Cade)
Im having problems with backgrounds. And lighting.

I need a sort of dark grey background like you see those people use with their costume minifigures on flickr, but I don't know if thats fabric or paper. I also need a lamp for taking the pictures, but I don't know which one will do the job. Please help if you get the time.

Like this? http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/azazaza/Kleinpanzers/Dayseven/1.png

That's a sort of velvety fabric, but I'm pretty sure anything will work. Sheets, paper, shirts, I've seen it all used with varying success. As for lights, an ordinary desk light will work. You might want a piece of thin paper to diffuse the light a little, and you'll want to make sure the light's coming slightly from the front of the thing being photographed. You can do a search on google for "home-made lightbox" if you want.
Permalink
| March 15, 2011, 11:44 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
Okay, I have found my inner inspiration from looking at other builders. But now that I have ideas, I need advice on building them. here's some links:

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/257759

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/254127

I am currently working on a train station that I could give you a link to if you want. I think my main problems is vehicles so if you want to give me advice on that it would be great! Plus, any other advice would also be Fantabulously Scrumdillyumptous.


I'd be glad to offer any advice I can. I'm a visual thinker, though, so it helps me to see what you're up to. If you've got a link that I could check out, that would be great.

Also, give me a better idea of what you mean with "advice on vehicles." What kind of vehicles are you thinking of doing? What colors? What scale? Things like that.

Step into my office...let's talk.

Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 7:56 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
Step into my office...let's talk.

Careful mate, nobody'd ever accept an offer like that from Lee Jones, and we all know Kelso's reputation is almost as dismal!
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:03 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
"My knowledge of life is limited to death..."

~ Paul Baumer

All quiet on the Western Front.

Just a quote I wanted to share with you. Lately I also have not had much time to build or take pictures of things already built, so in my spare time I've been playing Pokemon and watching All quiet on the Western Front. A good movie, it really hits you hard. That quote especially. If you haven't seen either version (Original 1930 which can be veined online, or the 1979 remake). The remake is much more watchable, but the original just comes out on top. They are really inspiring me for my WWI stuff. Just wanted you ponder on this quote though.


Haven't seen the movies - got the book by Remarque, though. Powerful work.

People always ask me about getting inspirations for builds, or WHAT to build. All they need to do is read stories (or watch them as you did) to get all of the inspiration one could ever ask for. I've got a collection of over 1,000 classic pieces of literature, and every book is chock-full of events, perspectives, locations, characters, etc. that could be portrayed in Lego.

Anyway, I like the quote...I know what it means to me. I'd be interested to know what kind of meaning it has for you? Here's one that comes to mind in response...

"Trouble? LIFE is trouble. Only death is no trouble."

Joseph Campbell - The Power of Myth

Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:08 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Manqué (Cade)
Im having problems with backgrounds. And lighting.

I need a sort of dark grey background like you see those people use with their costume minifigures on flickr, but I don't know if thats fabric or paper. I also need a lamp for taking the pictures, but I don't know which one will do the job. Please help if you get the time.


No prob. Areetsa had some good advice. I'll go ahead and supplement that a bit...

You can certainly use cloth of some kind, as he mentioned. Just be certain it's smoothed out properly, and if possible, a good distance from your MOC. That way it's sure to be out of focus (which is best, so the viewer's eye remains on the MOC itself, and that should be sharply in focus).

I also really like backgrounds made from black poster board. They have a dark grey coloration, and since they reflect light just a bit, also vary in value as the board curves toward the bottom. It breaks up the background a bit with some variety without being too strong.

As for light, you can certainly use a desk lamp. I prefer clamp lights, so they can be moved higher or lower, as well as from side to side, and closer or farther - they're not restricted to sitting on a table, for example. I would recommend picking up a "natural" colored bulb when you get a chance (they look more blue), instead of the standard yellow incandescent bulbs. The color's MUCH better, and leaves you less work to mess with in any digital retouching before you post. If you use the regular yellow bulbs, you should definitely rework the color in an application before posting your pics.

One other option for lighting is to use natural light. Just try to find an indoor location where the sunlight coming in is reflecting off the walls and ceiling, and not hitting your MOC directly. This kind of light has great color. The down side is that you, of course, can't change it's location - so you have to move your MOC around for the best results, vs. moving the light source.

Hope these tips help. Good luck!

Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:22 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
Careful mate, nobody'd ever accept an offer like that from Lee Jones, and we all know Kelso's reputation is almost as dismal!


Jones is still the master - I kneel before him. Wait...that was poorly worded.


Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:25 am
Quoting Mark Kelso
People always ask me about getting inspirations for builds, or WHAT to build. All they need to do is read stories (or watch them as you did) to get all of the inspiration one could ever ask for. I've got a collection of over 1,000 classic pieces of literature, and every book is chock-full of events, perspectives, locations, characters, etc. that could be portrayed in Lego.

Anyway, I like the quote...I know what it means to me. I'd be interested to know what kind of meaning it has for you? Here's one that comes to mind in response...

"Trouble? LIFE is trouble. Only death is no trouble."

Joseph Campbell - The Power of Myth


"The mark of the immature man is that he wants to die nobly for a cause, while the mark of a mature man is that he wants to live humbly for one."
Wilhelm Stekel.

Also, a good way of getting ideas is to stay awake doing things and not go to sleep until you've got an idea. Personally, I find the best time for writing things to be around 2:30 in the morning. Although I've noticed there's a definite change in tone; things written in the day tend to, well, be fairly serious matters written in an innately humorous fashion. At night, same thing, but trying a bit too hard to be "serious" in tone. Which I suppose means that since I'm not that good at expressing serious sounding things I subconsciously convert them into snarky comments. Although since I'm not a psychologist I'm really just talking out of my ears here.

Quoting Mark Kelso
Jones is still the master - I kneel before him. Wait...that was poorly worded.

Fact of nature, anything you write about Lee Jones that couldn't have been lifted right out of a Moral Guardian's blog is automatically converted into innuendo. I'd make a comment about Freudian impulses here, but I know better.

Quoting Mark Kelso
White balance

I do want to point out that there's a couple of things that can affect that; one is if your camera has customisable settings or a feature I've heard about where you hold a white object in front of it and tell it that that's what "white" looks like, so even if it thinks it looks more yellowish, it'll treat it as white. Two, you can adjust the zoom; I find that zooming in or out affects both the brightness of the photo and how yellow it looks. Three, you can edit it in a suitable program; once you find a set of settings that work, you can use those on pretty much every photo. You'll generally want to adjust it to make it a bit more blue, but not too far or it'll look purple. Four, you can change the background; a blue background will, as a rule, result in less yellowish photos than a plain white one although it also has a completely different impact on presentation (black ones also narrow things a bit, focusing all the viewer's attention on the photographed object by having everything else be pitch black, but they've got some light dampening features that make them hard to use) and five, you can just take the lazy way and stop making mocs with grey or white parts, since they're the only ones that really get affected by yellow tints.
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:52 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

I'd be glad to offer any advice I can. I'm a visual thinker, though, so it helps me to see what you're up to. If you've got a link that I could check out, that would be great.

Also, give me a better idea of what you mean with "advice on vehicles." What kind of vehicles are you thinking of doing? What colors? What scale? Things like that.

Step into my office...let's talk.

Okay, I feel like it's done but I think you should see it before I post

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5532451451/

Some things I don't like, the train, the station, the tracks. IF you could give me some advice it would be awsome.

As for vehicles, I try to make fig sized vehicles, but when I try to look up some inspiration, I can't resist using thier technique to solve thier problems. For instance, I am currently trying to build a halftrack, but it looks exactly like Lt. John Harlands. What do you do when you are building Vehicles? any advice on other things I'm not good at would be amazing!
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 4:32 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso


Wait... Poster board?

Legohaulic told me this (http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/257923) had poster board. It looks like a sheet of paper or fabric...
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 5:43 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

Haven't seen the movies - got the book by Remarque, though. Powerful work.

If you get the chance to see either one, jump on that chance. As I said, I recommend the original overall, but the remake is pretty good movie too.


Quoting Mark Kelso
People always ask me about getting inspirations for builds, or WHAT to build. All they need to do is read stories (or watch them as you did) to get all of the inspiration one could ever ask for. I've got a collection of over 1,000 classic pieces of literature, and every book is chock-full of events, perspectives, locations, characters, etc. that could be portrayed in Lego.

Exactly. I've haven't had much LEGO time in the past few weeks, been trying to build. So I decided to read a few good books (Read Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follet, a really good book) and watching movies. As of now I really felt burnt out with Sci-Fi, I think HMSS Phipson is my last Sci-Fi build for a while. I defiantly want to portray the horror and emotion felt in WWI, that will be a challenge, but worth it. And I might build some stuff from Pillars of the Earth, there are a bunch of great things there. This time away from the brick has really been helpful, I've been able to gather my senses and come up with some good ideas.

Quoting Mark Kelso
Anyway, I like the quote...I know what it means to me. I'd be interested to know what kind of meaning it has for you? Here's one that comes to mind in response...

"Trouble? LIFE is trouble. Only death is no trouble."

Joseph Campbell - The Power of Myth

Yeah, to me it is all the emotion of every person in WWI; Wifes, sons, daughters, husbands, fathers, mothers, grandfathers, grandmothers etc... The raw emotion they were feeling, the emotion that was censored. What war truly is...
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 7:59 pm
One of the reasons I brought it up was because of Lee Jones' recent post, but I don't want to get to political. Also, a friend I originally met here, and he moved on to Flickr was recently shot, he's going to live though. He was alerting his parents that the neighbor's car was being stolen. Luckily it was just in the shoulder. If you're wondering who it is, It was Sander van Lemberg. You may remember him from a few "crises" back with the Galactic Federation Of Free Worlds. But, we have since put our differences aside and are friends here. I'm looking for the book too, hopefully my school's library has it. It really is powerful. A good movie, not entertaining, for war really shouldn't be. It may sound hypocritical coming from a guy who created a Sci-Fi faction who wages war on a group of rebels, but it really is the truth.
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:27 pm
Quoting Matthew Novosad
One of the reasons I brought it up was because of Lee Jones' recent post, but I don't want to get to political. Also, a friend I originally met here, and he moved on to Flickr was recently shot, he's going to live though. He was alerting his parents that the neighbor's car was being stolen. Luckily it was just in the shoulder. If you're wondering who it is, It was Sander van Lemberg.

So it's got to the point where a car is worth more than someone's life? That sort of thing is why I'm so fond of crime management plans which start with "first, reduce the crime-prone demographics to a more manageable size". The Cylon solutions aren't pretty to watch, but you have to admit they'd get the job done.
Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 8:46 pm
Quoting Areetsa C
Quoting Matthew Novosad
One of the reasons I brought it up was because of Lee Jones' recent post, but I don't want to get to political. Also, a friend I originally met here, and he moved on to Flickr was recently shot, he's going to live though. He was alerting his parents that the neighbor's car was being stolen. Luckily it was just in the shoulder. If you're wondering who it is, It was Sander van Lemberg.

So it's got to the point where a car is worth more than someone's life? That sort of thing is why I'm so fond of crime management plans which start with "first, reduce the crime-prone demographics to a more manageable size". The Cylon solutions aren't pretty to watch, but you have to admit they'd get the job done.

Yeah. I was just taliking with him on Flickr not even ten minutes beforehand. I was shocked.

Permalink
| March 16, 2011, 9:01 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
Okay, I feel like it's done but I think you should see it before I post

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mango_train/5532451451/

Some things I don't like, the train, the station, the tracks. IF you could give me some advice it would be awsome.

As for vehicles, I try to make fig sized vehicles, but when I try to look up some inspiration, I can't resist using thier technique to solve thier problems. For instance, I am currently trying to build a halftrack, but it looks exactly like Lt. John Harlands. What do you do when you are building Vehicles? any advice on other things I'm not good at would be amazing!


Cool - thanks for the link...

Okay, so...some things that come to mind: I like the height variation, right off the bat. I also think your color work is solid, particularly given that this is a war MOC and the mood those colors set is appropriate.

It may or may not be possible for you to smooth out the textures, but all of the studs are a bit distracting. A more advanced build would probably show far fewer studs. You could tile out studs-up areas, and use brick-built approaches to the walls of the train.

From the one shot you provided, there also seems to be some inconsistency between the building, and the rest of the scene. Once again, I think it gets down to the textural quality...The building shows no studs (that I can recall), while the rest of the MOC is heavily studded.

The positioning of the figs seems fine. It's a personal choice with builders to either spread figs out (which tends to create a bit of visual chaos), or to condense them into specific focal areas (which tends to lead the eye to a certain spot). I think for this MOC, the figs are placed fine.

I won't say too much on the photo work at this point, given you just snapped off a quick shot for me to have a look at, but...in your post, try to set up the pics so they really do justice to the mood of the build. Any time we build something, we've got something to say with it. Sometimes that message is super-simple (like "this is fun"), sometimes it's very serious (like "the loss of life"), etc. Try to display your creation in a way that supports or reflects what the work is saying - it will make the message all the stronger.

And as for vehicles, I actually think you're right on track with looking at other's work and emulating what they build. That's how we learn more and improve with our skills. Also, keep in mind that if you're building a similar vehicle as another builder, you're both shooting for the same thing...so it's very likely that they'll look similar. If you feel your work looks too much like that of another's, I'd suggest looking at a reference picture or two of the actual vehicle, and ask yourself how you might make adjustments to the contstruction based upon those references. That way you're getting away from the influence of another builder, and going right to the visual source of your subject.

Good Luck!
Permalink
| March 17, 2011, 8:04 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Manqué (Cade)
Wait... Poster board?

Legohaulic told me this (http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/257923) had poster board. It looks like a sheet of paper or fabric...


Poster board is great if your MOC's aren't too large. It's got a very nuetral value and color range, and it doesn't wrinkle like fabric. Also, it's inexpensive, which is always a plus!

Permalink
| March 17, 2011, 8:08 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
This time away from the brick has really been helpful, I've been able to gather my senses and come up with some good ideas.


Never a bad idea to take a break from building. Usually life forces me to take breaks, but regardless, I come back refreshed and ready to put my full energy into being creative. I just wouldn't mind it if my breaks were a little shorter and less frequent (sheesh!).

Permalink
| March 17, 2011, 8:13 am
So I wrote a lengthy monologue about gore in war dios and the popularity of missing arms, but all I can remember to retype is the bit at the end: "if anything, NONE of the dios I've seen are "realistic" in that sense. Thing is, firearms don't kill by shooting out magic death rays. They do it by adding a lot of structually superfluous holes to someone's organs, which causes them to bleed to death. Apparently humans have a lot of blood. Supposedly the scene of your average shooting death looks more like a slaughterhouse than even the goriest of movie demises, although obviously I'm not talking from experience here. Allegedly it's "ruin the carpet and permanently stain the floorboards" excessive. Since it can apparently take quite a while for someone to die of it, according to what I've read of self defenses in America, you can also add the wallpaper, furniture and anything else the soon-to-be-late criminal stumbles into while shuffling off this mortal coil."

(if you want to delete this as "possibly frightening for small children" you can. Waffling on at length on nothing at all is one of the things I do as naturally as breathing, so this going missing wouldn't be a huge loss.)
Permalink
| March 17, 2011, 8:30 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
So I wrote a lengthy monologue about gore...


It's not pretty. Blood tends to splatter a lot and we'll just leave it at that. Cartoon violence can be fun, but real life... not so much.
Permalink
| March 17, 2011, 9:18 am
Hey Chris! (or Mark) Currently I'm working on a microscale diorama with a space ship (don't worry, I'm not a halo kiddie or clonetard, it's actually quite cool) above it. What's the best way to make a base, sans baseplate? I don't have enough, and the ones I do have are too small. (That's what she said)
Permalink
| March 19, 2011, 8:17 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

Jones is still the master - I kneel before him. Wait...that was poorly worded.


Okay then...
Permalink
| March 19, 2011, 8:24 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Aero !
Hey Chris! (or Mark) Currently I'm working on a microscale diorama with a space ship (don't worry, I'm not a halo kiddie or clonetard, it's actually quite cool) above it. What's the best way to make a base, sans baseplate? I don't have enough, and the ones I do have are too small. (That's what she said)


Base plates are fine. If you don't have enough of one color, get creative by using other colors in the base of your dio where they won't be seen - who cares if you've got a blue baseplate under something if it's hidden, right? Or, just as an example, use that blue base plate as a water element.

You could also use a combination of standard large plates (6x6, 6x12, 6x16, etc.). Or for that matter, you could create a large wall of bricks (providing you've got the parts needed) and turn the wall on it's side (often referred to as "studs out") to serve as the base of your structure or scene. This is actually a preferred method for those that don't like the studs showing. The down side is that you can't easily attach something on top of that kind of base, so much of what you put on top needs to be free-standing. But, it's a great way to do roads, pavement, and other surfaces that are supposed to look smooth.

Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 8:56 am
Quoting Chris Phipson

It's not pretty. Blood tends to splatter a lot and we'll just leave it at that. Cartoon violence can be fun, but real life... not so much.

Are you planning on being at Brickworld?

Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 2:06 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso
Quoting Matthew Novosad
This time away from the brick has really been helpful, I've been able to gather my senses and come up with some good ideas.


Never a bad idea to take a break from building. Usually life forces me to take breaks, but regardless, I come back refreshed and ready to put my full energy into being creative. I just wouldn't mind it if my breaks were a little shorter and less frequent (sheesh!).

Are you gonna be at Brickworld this year?
Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 2:07 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Mudskipper 4
Are you gonna be at Brickworld this year?


This year may be a "no go" for me. My wife and I have our house up for sale, and if we're in the middle of a move I won't be able to attend. I won't know for sure until the last minute, though. Meanwhile, I'm still planning as though I'll be attending. It's not something to miss if one can help it!!!

Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 9:52 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

This year may be a "no go" for me. My wife and I have our house up for sale, and if we're in the middle of a move I won't be able to attend. I won't know for sure until the last minute, though. Meanwhile, I'm still planning as though I'll be attending. It's not something to miss if one can help it!!!

NOOOOO! I am actually going to be attending this year. I'll be helping a professional brick film studio that will be vending there, and working with my friend who is using it as a jump-start for his model business. I was seriously looking forward to meeting some passionate AFOL's, you in particular. Strange, artsy people like myself like to know other strange artsy people like you. :P Well, I certainly hope you can make it.
Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 10:19 pm
Im doing a MOC that is the interior of a building. I am using LDD and there is no real way that I can build this without it, and I need a way to make the walls looked cracked. What could I use to give it the right look?
Permalink
| March 20, 2011, 10:20 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Mudskipper 4
NOOOOO! I am actually going to be attending this year. I'll be helping a professional brick film studio that will be vending there, and working with my friend who is using it as a jump-start for his model business. I was seriously looking forward to meeting some passionate AFOL's, you in particular. Strange, artsy people like myself like to know other strange artsy people like you. :P Well, I certainly hope you can make it.


I can pretty much garuntee that I'll at least be there for a day. What's up in the air is if I can take four days to do the whole event. But I'm sure one day isn't asking too much, so I'll look forward to at least stopping by and hanging out with you for a bit. Still want to shoot for the whole weekend, though! ;)

Permalink
| March 21, 2011, 7:39 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Leon Powalski
Im doing a MOC that is the interior of a building. I am using LDD and there is no real way that I can build this without it, and I need a way to make the walls looked cracked. What could I use to give it the right look?


A couple things that come to mind to create a cracked wall effect would be...

1) A combo of slopes and inverted slopes. You can create gaps between the slopes by adding a plate, and it gives you a nice crack effect.

2) If you want to go with smaller cracks, I'd recommend doing some custom labels that could be placed selectively.

Permalink
| March 21, 2011, 7:45 am
Excuse me Mr. Kelso,You may not know this, but I replied to your comment a few posts up, and I was wondering when you will get back to me on it.
*batts eylashes and giggles like a small girl*
Permalink
| March 21, 2011, 2:42 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting luke peterson
Excuse me Mr. Kelso,You may not know this, but I replied to your comment a few posts up, and I was wondering when you will get back to me on it.
*batts eylashes and giggles like a small girl*


You did indeed, and this was my reply to your reply...

Quoting Mark Kelso

Cool - thanks for the link...

Okay, so...some things that come to mind: I like the height variation, right off the bat. I also think your color work is solid, particularly given that this is a war MOC and the mood those colors set is appropriate.

It may or may not be possible for you to smooth out the textures, but all of the studs are a bit distracting. A more advanced build would probably show far fewer studs. You could tile out studs-up areas, and use brick-built approaches to the walls of the train.

From the one shot you provided, there also seems to be some inconsistency between the building, and the rest of the scene. Once again, I think it gets down to the textural quality...The building shows no studs (that I can recall), while the rest of the MOC is heavily studded.

The positioning of the figs seems fine. It's a personal choice with builders to either spread figs out (which tends to create a bit of visual chaos), or to condense them into specific focal areas (which tends to lead the eye to a certain spot). I think for this MOC, the figs are placed fine.

I won't say too much on the photo work at this point, given you just snapped off a quick shot for me to have a look at, but...in your post, try to set up the pics so they really do justice to the mood of the build. Any time we build something, we've got something to say with it. Sometimes that message is super-simple (like "this is fun"), sometimes it's very serious (like "the loss of life"), etc. Try to display your creation in a way that supports or reflects what the work is saying - it will make the message all the stronger.

And as for vehicles, I actually think you're right on track with looking at other's work and emulating what they build. That's how we learn more and improve with our skills. Also, keep in mind that if you're building a similar vehicle as another builder, you're both shooting for the same thing...so it's very likely that they'll look similar. If you feel your work looks too much like that of another's, I'd suggest looking at a reference picture or two of the actual vehicle, and ask yourself how you might make adjustments to the contstruction based upon those references. That way you're getting away from the influence of another builder, and going right to the visual source of your subject.

Good Luck!


Or did I miss an additional communication? If so, let me know (be patient...I'm old and senile!), and I'll be sure to follow up.


Permalink
| March 21, 2011, 10:31 pm
Quoting Mark Kelso

You did indeed, and this was my reply to your reply...

Quoting Mark Kelso

Cool - thanks for the link...

Okay, so...some things that come to mind: I like the height variation, right off the bat. I also think your color work is solid, particularly given that this is a war MOC and the mood those colors set is appropriate.

It may or may not be possible for you to smooth out the textures, but all of the studs are a bit distracting. A more advanced build would probably show far fewer studs. You could tile out studs-up areas, and use brick-built approaches to the walls of the train.

From the one shot you provided, there also seems to be some inconsistency between the building, and the rest of the scene. Once again, I think it gets down to the textural quality...The building shows no studs (that I can recall), while the rest of the MOC is heavily studded.

The positioning of the figs seems fine. It's a personal choice with builders to either spread figs out (which tends to create a bit of visual chaos), or to condense them into specific focal areas (which tends to lead the eye to a certain spot). I think for this MOC, the figs are placed fine.

I won't say too much on the photo work at this point, given you just snapped off a quick shot for me to have a look at, but...in your post, try to set up the pics so they really do justice to the mood of the build. Any time we build something, we've got something to say with it. Sometimes that message is super-simple (like "this is fun"), sometimes it's very serious (like "the loss of life"), etc. Try to display your creation in a way that supports or reflects what the work is saying - it will make the message all the stronger.

And as for vehicles, I actually think you're right on track with looking at other's work and emulating what they build. That's how we learn more and improve with our skills. Also, keep in mind that if you're building a similar vehicle as another builder, you're both shooting for the same thing...so it's very likely that they'll look similar. If you feel your work looks too much like that of another's, I'd suggest looking at a reference picture or two of the actual vehicle, and ask yourself how you might make adjustments to the contstruction based upon those references. That way you're getting away from the influence of another builder, and going right to the visual source of your subject.

Good Luck!


Or did I miss an additional communication? If so, let me know (be patient...I'm old and senile!), and I'll be sure to follow up.


Oops! so sorry, I could have sworn that wasn't there before.
Permalink
| March 22, 2011, 1:28 pm
I built for the first time in a while on Monday, yesterday, and today (Wednesday). Boy does it feel good to be back! I also finished the H.M.S.S Phipson, I'll try to get that up this weekend, or sometime next week.
Permalink
| March 23, 2011, 5:42 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
I built for the first time in a while on Monday, yesterday, and today (Wednesday). Boy does it feel good to be back! I also finished the H.M.S.S Phipson, I'll try to get that up this weekend, or sometime next week.


My God, can I relate! I've been pulling overtime with work along with fixing up the house to sell, and studying for college entrance exams...hardly LOOKED at the bricks for weeks now. I finally did some building for a BW collaborative, and it was bliss, baby...pure, 100%, unadulterated bliss!!!

Anyway, looking forward to that ship. Although with a name like that, I'd scuttle her before she even leaves the harbor!

Permalink
| March 24, 2011, 7:52 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Matthew Novosad
I also finished the H.M.S.S Phipson, I'll try to get that up this weekend, or sometime next week.


Ya know, there's a pill for that...
Permalink
| March 24, 2011, 11:47 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Chris Phipson

Ya know, there's a pill for that...


Wow, how did I miss THAT one? Thanks for covering for me, Phippy - good to know "Captain Innuendo" is on the job...on the job...uh-oh, looks like he's got more work to do!

Permalink
| March 25, 2011, 8:09 am
I'm not going to be on as much for a while. So no post for now D:
Permalink
| March 26, 2011, 7:50 pm
Quoting Chris Phipson

Ya know, there's a pill for that...

Trololololo. Now I'm getting back to Minecraft, I've been bitten by that bug.
Permalink
| March 26, 2011, 9:31 pm
I just finished reading "All Quiet on the Western Front" Just as good as the movies made from it. Probably because so little was changed in the movies. Most of the lines are direct from the book. The format seems more like the book's in the remake, and there are some things that weren't in the original, but in the book and vise versa. All three amazingly powerful works.
Permalink
| March 30, 2011, 8:51 pm
Quoting Country Biscuit
Well Mark, Chris, and all other AFOL's here, throw mw a party. Because today, I'm an offical AFOL. I remember asking Chris if 18 is considered AFOL, he said yes, and today, I'm 18. I don't build like an AFOL, (a shocker I know) but have the knowledge to do so. Its just, not enough resources. So, without further hessitation, "Another one bites the brick!" Oh yeeeeha. Hehe.

Congratz dude! Happy Birthday! I haven't heard from you in a while, just busy?
Permalink
| March 31, 2011, 12:12 pm
Quoting Country Biscuit
Little bit. But doing MOCS yet again. Slowly.

That's good, same here. I'm working on another plane, and I have a few builds I've got to take pictures of. But, I must finish my History Thesis Paper, it's due tomorrow.
Permalink
| March 31, 2011, 4:13 pm
Quoting Country Biscuit
Well Mark, Chris, and all other AFOL's here, throw mw a party. Because today, I'm an offical AFOL. I remember asking Chris if 18 is considered AFOL, he said yes, and today, I'm 18. I don't build like an AFOL, (a shocker I know) but have the knowledge to do so. Its just, not enough resources. So, without further hessitation, "Another one bites the brick!" Oh yeeeeha. Hehe.

AFOL status, like driving age, is based more on maturity than biological age. I can't see anyone complaining about electing Sven Junga an honorary AFOL, for instance.

Besides, being an AFOL doesn't make you any more important. It just means you're expected to do more. And YFOLs will treat you like a deity, but only if you build better than them.
Permalink
| March 31, 2011, 5:00 pm
Quoting Country Biscuit
Well Mark, Chris, and all other AFOL's here, throw mw a party. Because today, I'm an offical AFOL. I remember asking Chris if 18 is considered AFOL, he said yes, and today, I'm 18. I don't build like an AFOL, (a shocker I know) but have the knowledge to do so. Its just, not enough resources. So, without further hessitation, "Another one bites the brick!" Oh yeeeeha. Hehe.

Funny... it happens to be my birthday too. I am now officially a TFOL
Permalink
| March 31, 2011, 6:25 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting cj cutrone9
Mr. Kelso, What is your favorite brick built spaceship?

Your favorite that you made and your favorite one that you didn't make.


For my own work, that's an easy one...my Cylon Raider. Not the largest of what I've built, but DEFINITELY the best quality.

As for other's work, that's NOT so easy. In fact, it's down right impossible to say. Here are my top five, though. Once you get to this level, it's tough to argue that one is better than another - each is just a masterpiece of ABSexy...

Erik Varszegi - Venator: IMHO, possibly THE finest ship ever built, and a huge influence on my own work. http://www.fbtb.net/features/interview-erik-varszegi/

Daniel Jassim - Dragonstar: Very "old school" looking these days (goes to show how fast building techniques have changed), but one of my first experiences with Lego ships, and a major player in the history of Lego ship building.
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/678

Thomas Benedikt - Mon Calamari: Again, my opinion only, but if Varszegi's ain't the best, then this one IS! (at least until he's finished with his most recent project)
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/105030

Rob Dasnewten - Naganata: This is mostly about a "style" of building. Pick anything of Rob's, really. Not a big ship, of course, but STUNNING color, PU, and design.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dasnewten/2819836597/

2 x 4 - Viper: This is the Viper from the original Battlestar Galactica. Why is something so small potentially my favorite ship of all time...because it's done just THAT well! It's really the result of numerous builders perfecting methods of PU and techniques, but 2 x 4 put it all together in this masterpiece. I'll say the same of my own Cylon Raider - this Viper is perfection, and I defy anyone to do it better!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/-2x4-/4534119753/in/faves-22824835@N05/
Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 8:48 am
Quoting Mark Kelso

For my own work, that's an easy one...my Cylon Raider. Not the largest of what I've built, but DEFINITELY the best quality.

As for other's work, that's NOT so easy. In fact, it's down right impossible to say. Here are my top five, though. Once you get to this level, it's tough to argue that one is better than another - each is just a masterpiece of ABSexy... (etc)


And what do you think about my own personal favourite, the BTII by Nathan Proudlove?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/87126


Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 8:55 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Country Biscuit
Well Mark, Chris, and all other AFOL's here, throw mw a party. Because today, I'm an offical AFOL. I remember asking Chris if 18 is considered AFOL, he said yes, and today, I'm 18. I don't build like an AFOL, (a shocker I know) but have the knowledge to do so. Its just, not enough resources. So, without further hessitation, "Another one bites the brick!" Oh yeeeeha. Hehe.


Welcome to the land of AFOLs, where, ironically enough, immaturity reigns supreme! Time to put away those foolish, idyllic notions of what it means to be an adult Lego builder, and face the reality of grown men (and a few courageous women) behaving like baboons brandishing a mouse and keypad. Now go build something involving childish smack-talk to your fellow AFOL as your initiation!


Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:28 am
 Group admin 
Quoting cj cutrone9
Those all made my jaw drop.

I am supprised neither of you put these.

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/6489

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/175845

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/194602

The last one looks like LDD but keep going down the page and you can tell it isn't.




http://mocpages.com/moc.php/6489 - Too choppy with the surface texture for my tastes, but no denying an AMAZING feat of ABS engineering!

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/175845 - A worthy candidate to be sure. Kevin's got sick skills!

http://mocpages.com/moc.php/194602 - This is, in fact LDD, and I don't count those. (But great rendering, so I could see why you would think it was real). Not that the parts usage isn't kickazz, BUT virtual MOCs don't have GRAVITY to contend with, and when gravity's involved, it's a WHOLE new ballgame!

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:38 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Yuri Fassio
Quoting Mark Kelso

For my own work, that's an easy one...my Cylon Raider. Not the largest of what I've built, but DEFINITELY the best quality.

As for other's work, that's NOT so easy. In fact, it's down right impossible to say. Here are my top five, though. Once you get to this level, it's tough to argue that one is better than another - each is just a masterpiece of ABSexy... (etc)


And what do you think about my own personal favourite, the BTII by Nathan Proudlove?
http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/87126



Ahh, see...I'd forgotten about that one. Not a fav of mine, but absolutely a great MOC. Just about everything Nathan does is smoking good.

By the way, Great to hear from ya, Yuri!

Permalink
| April 2, 2011, 10:42 am
Group moderators have locked this conversation.
Other topics
student teen kid toy play lego child video game hobby blocks construction toy legos fun games



LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop MOCpages Advice


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2014 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use