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Hi everyone!

I started this topic to find out a little bit more about the techniques you use for taking and/or editing pictures. I would like my pictures to look a little bit more professional and I am curious to find out how everyone else is doing it.

What kind of setup do you have, or have you none at all? What kind of camera, background, lighting en tripods you use. Do you edit pictures afterwards, and if so, what software do you use? Do you know of any good tutorials to follow, or do you have recomendations?

Just splur you mind out about this topic onto this thread ;-)
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| March 15, 2012, 11:52 am
 Group admin 
No special equipment here. I have a pretty standard digital compactcamera (Canon PowerShot SX120), with all the necessary functions. I use my white salontable as background for most of my models. What I find most important is to use natural lighting, so I take pictures during daylight and never use a flash. Also I take at least 2 pictures from a similar angle, so I can choose the best. Once I have picked the most appropriate I use some basic filters from photo editing software to brighten the pics a bit, rectify colours and contrast. If necessary I crop the image to the desired proportions and finish with reducing the size to Internet friendly scale.
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| March 16, 2012, 3:42 am
Quoting Erik Hendrikx
Hi everyone!... ...Just splur you mind out about this topic onto this thread ;-)


Hi Eric. I am by no means a great photographer but some of my photos come out nicely. I am similar to Nathanael but I don’t really edit my photos. However I have just started to play around with editing software.

Get a large sheet of white or black paper (A1 or A0) from an art shop. Place the paper half on the floor (or table top) and the other half rolled up the wall. Place you moc in the centre. This ensures that your moc is the only thing in the picture.

I take my photos in natural day light as close to a big window as poss, but not in direct sun light. Have the light/window behind you and the camera. Try and figure out the best place in you house and the best time of day. This relies on good weather.

Set camera on Macro (close up mode). Turn the flash off. Take shed loads of shots from all angles. When you get better you can alter the camera’s settings to allow more light in - aperture (size of the shutter/hole) and shutter speed.

A tripod is a great idea especially if you alter the settings. It eliminates the shaky and out of focus photos. I use a gorilla pod. I also take many photos with the camera flat on the floor – worm’s eye view. Personally I love this effect and I often use it.

Good luck

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| April 14, 2012, 10:32 am
Thanks for your advice guys! This will really help me and others shoot better pictures. :-)
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| April 14, 2012, 11:38 am
I use a Ricoh R8 for my pictures. As I don't get to take many of the pictures with natural light I have to add some artificial light. I have a 40W halogene spot and an energy saver "bulb" equivalent to 40W with daylight spectrum in my living room. Each time I take a picture of a LEGO model I direct both light sources towards the model from different angles.

As a background I use a table cloth. I have two of those in different shades of grey. Depending on the colour of the model I use the one with the most contrast.

I only use flash to show a detail that would be in the dark with the normal lighting. I take the non-flash photos with a medium size tripod and exposure times between 1/8s (daylight) and 2s (artificial light and dark background).

I take almost all of my photos in macro mode. You can make a tiny model look quite big with the zoom in wide angle and getting really close with the camera in macro mode.
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| April 16, 2012, 5:56 pm
I use my 12.2mp Fujifilm Finepix, with (as of recently) A3 sheets of paper (one vertically, one horizonally..) for a background. I don't tend to use lots of fancy lights and stuff, meaning i still have big shadows, but instead use photoshop to lighten them and add any refinements, E.g cropping, shadow lightening and photo merge (main photo's).
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| April 24, 2012, 12:02 pm
I just use my old Canon PowerShot A610, I pretty old camera but it works and I like the feel of it. For lighting I normally shoot at night on our dining room table with all the lights turned on. I did shoot in the day once, but the photos didn't look as good. I normally put a white sheet of paper under my MOCs and a big white poster board behind them. for larger MOCs you can sometimes see the corners, but I'm a little lazy when it comes to photos so as long as the MOC looks good a really don't care.

Might try a few of the ideas others have, I think it was in direct sun the time I tried it which is why it didn't work, so I may try natural lighting again sometime. My mom owns a photo studio so one of these days I really got to bring all my stuff in and have her take some really nice pictures of all of it. But until then, why I do works good enough for me.
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| April 25, 2012, 3:04 pm
And when you take pictures in daylight, do you take them outside or inside? I don't have a garden, only a balcony where I take my pictures, and it seems to give me to much shadoweffect. I get this blue hue over all my pictures, which I'm not able to clear up with photo-editing, of which I know little anyways

Quoting Nathanael Kuipers
No special equipment here. I have a pretty standard digital compactcamera (Canon PowerShot SX120), with all the necessary functions. I use my white salontable as background for most of my models. What I find most important is to use natural lighting, so I take pictures during daylight and never use a flash. Also I take at least 2 pictures from a similar angle, so I can choose the best. Once I have picked the most appropriate I use some basic filters from photo editing software to brighten the pics a bit, rectify colours and contrast. If necessary I crop the image to the desired proportions and finish with reducing the size to Internet friendly scale.


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| May 22, 2012, 9:15 am
I only ever tried day pictures once and it was inside but in a room with lots of windows.
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| May 23, 2012, 8:05 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Erik Hendrikx

Sorry, I forgot to mention that! I always make sure that there is no direct sunlight on the model, because it gives nasty shadows. I take pictures inside, although it's important to have a bright surrounding with lots of white and windows.
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| May 24, 2012, 2:27 am
So, after many tryouts and mishaps, I think I got the hang of it now. I just added a new creation and it looks pretty good. Maybe a bit too bright, but it's okay. I Took the photo's during daylight, but with extra daylightlamps against a white paper background. I also fiddled a bit with the settings on my camera, which I couldn't find for the longest time. The settings, not the camera. And I adjusted a few things with photo editing software. Thanks everyone for all your advice. It was very helpfull. I'm pretty pleased with the results now. :-) Come have a look if you want, and tell me what you think. It's the 4953 Sporty Plane
Permalink
| May 31, 2012, 5:46 pm
Few tips:
1. I shoot inside without flash, next to a large window, but not when the sun falls on the table directly. I also switch on all lights around, it softens the shadows. The window should ideally be almost behind you, a bit to the side.
2. Before I shoot, I manually set white balance. Most (all?) cameras have this feature, just we don't use it normally, so I had to look it up in the manual. The general procedure is always the same, you point your camera at the white paper you use, under exactly the same conditions as you will use when shooting, and press some button, see the manual. White paper will be really white then.
3. In order to get superior pictures without flashlight, use self-timer. Set it to 2 seconds or so, point, take a deep breath and hold it (sharpshooters use this technique :-)), press your trigger and then steady your hands. You will be surprised how much sharper your pictures will be. I use this trick often when taking pictures indoors and do not want to use flash (it makes the picture look too hard). Try a candle-lit scene this way :-).
4. I actually do not use Macro. Pretty much every camera distorts the picture near the borders, also the exposure and colour temperature are off there (the white paper turns grey). I use normal shooting mode without any zoom, from distance of about half a meter, in this way what matters will be near the centre where the camera does its best job, also the perspective distortion is smaller. You can crop it afterwards in your favorite editing software.
But with Macro the results were not that much worse, so this could be just a matter of personal preference.

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| November 10, 2012, 12:10 pm
hmmm, it seems that the server side of the uploader is down (17th may 2013), is this the same for anyone else? the uploader launches and loads correctly, but when the photos are uploaded, all i get is an error, with missing image symbols where there should be images!

i have tried this on:

Win xp desktop, IE 8, google chrome, both with the lastest java update

Win 7 Netbook, IE 9, Firefox, also both with the latest java.

Any ideas, or comfirmation that this is indeed the case?
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| May 17, 2013, 1:57 pm
Quoting Thomas Lupson-Darnell
hmmm, it seems that the server side of the uploader is down (17th may 2013), is this the same for anyone else? the uploader launches and loads correctly, but when the photos are uploaded, all i get is an error, with missing image symbols where there should be images!

i have tried this on:

Win xp desktop, IE 8, google chrome, both with the lastest java update

Win 7 Netbook, IE 9, Firefox, also both with the latest java.

Any ideas, or comfirmation that this is indeed the case?

It was down for a few weeks, but now it is working again!
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| May 17, 2013, 11:37 pm
Quoting Halhi 141
It was down for a few weeks, but now it is working again!

Thanks, i haven't logged on for a while, so i didn't know, but will try again today!
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| May 18, 2013, 3:21 am
Quoting Thomas Lupson-Darnell
Thanks, i haven't logged on for a while, so i didn't know, but will try again today!

still not working, the mocpages server keeps closing the connection.
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| May 18, 2013, 4:38 am
Quoting Thomas Lupson-Darnell
still not working, the mocpages server keeps closing the connection.

What browser are you using? I generally have trouble with Internet Explorer, for instance, so it might be the browser...
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| June 25, 2013, 10:51 pm
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