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Why is it that LDD creations are looked down uppon?
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You read the title, now would you care to answer it
Permalink
| December 31, 2008, 8:03 pm
I do not know. I guess they think we could've copied someone elses. D:
Permalink
| December 31, 2008, 9:37 pm
In addition to, you are not spending as much time on your building. You also have not spent all the money that is required to have a large collection, and you look like an amiture!
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 4:20 pm
A virtual model is not really Lego. There is no possibility of seeing it in person or holding it in your hand.

In other words, virtual models have a Swooshability Factor of zero.
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 7:13 pm
Quoting Memory :D
Because LDD uses a limited palette, the users are usually younger and less experienced so they can't/don't want to install a more professional program, and because the method of taking pictures of finished models is the rendering equivalent of taking a picture with a cellphone camera.

Define "more professional programs". Do you mean LDraw by chance?

Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 7:46 pm
How much money you have should never be a factor in the level of your creativeness or or skill. A virtual builder uses the same techniques as someone using physical Lego - and although I am no master builder (not by a long shot), I can attest having built in both the digital and the physical that it is not necessarily faster or easier to build virtually (although you do save the time of hunting for parts).

Some might also consider virtual building a place of unlimited possibility - no limitations of collections size to stop you from expressing yourself fully. And while I use virtual building as only a step towards a physical creation, it is a person's talent and creativeness through which art (to include Lego) is created - the choice of medium is secondary.

I personally chose LDD over Ldraw for several reasons - it is much easier to use and has the convenience of ordering direct from Lego when you are ready. Admittedly, there are things you can do with LDraw that are not possible in LDD, and the available palette is much larger in LDraw; there are pros and cons to each of these two programs.
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:07 pm
ldd is looked down upon because it shows that you dont build the legos in real life (like i care) and its hard to show massive detail in ldd because its dark, and i dont know why else, it just doesnt look lego is what i say
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:11 pm
I enjoy physically building with lego, it's a hands on problem solving activity that gets me away from starring at a computer screen - which I spend enough time doing for photography.

I just think that people who settle for building entirely (or at least presenting online entirely) with a program such as LDD are really missing the point of the hobby all together.
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:27 pm
yah, i also think another reason is because they dont really have the pieces, they have unlimited pieces, which is cool, but it doesnt give some people a challenge, and they dont build cool stuff with a small ammount of pieces to work wiht
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:29 pm
I agree with Brenden.

I hate building on the computer. For me, its pointless, as I have enough Lego to get by.
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:35 pm
 Group admin 
Creativity is a very tactile, real-world experience (think of things like dance, music, sculpture, painting, cooking, etc ...much better when experienced in reality, in real time). I prefer the tactile, sensory experience of creating a MOC. It's the subtleties - the feel of the bricks, the sounds, and the act of constructing it. The digital MOC's loose those tanglible subtleties, and to me they're like other creative experiences that are reproduced...they're lessened to some degree.
Permalink
| January 1, 2009, 9:36 pm
I'd have to agree there - certainly I do miss the tactile experience of actual Lego when working digitally. There is definitely a certain specific experience to the process itself that is absent when working digitally. In as much as computer generated art is still art, though, virtual Lego is still Lego, even if the process of creation differs. Something of the artist/builder is still to be found in the result regardless.

I am very much into the entire process as well. For me, though it starts with the conceptual stages - before Lego even enters the picture. Then, the transference of ideas to computer, followed by the true building to come.

To say I or another virtual builder misses the point of the hobby? Lego, like any hobby is what you make of it. To find that escape, to experience the building, to get that joy, and to learn and better oneself. All these things are present throughout all of the kinds of building for me, so I don't think I miss the point at all!
Permalink
| January 2, 2009, 12:32 am
Quoting Shannon Young
A virtual model is not really Lego. There is no possibility of seeing it in person or holding it in your hand.

In other words, virtual models have a Swooshability Factor of zero.


Shannon's right, LDD or any other kind of digital program just doesn't have that sense of ABS playibility,and not to mention swooshability :D ~LL


Permalink
| January 2, 2009, 12:22 pm
I think it's harder because the angles on the LDD bricks are frustrating. Some connections that can be made in real-life can't be made in that program. My Crab Droid was my only brainchild on that wretched thing. Plus the bricks are way too expensive.
Permalink
| January 2, 2009, 2:14 pm
Having used both LDraw and physical lego bricks, I can say that CAD and real modeling both require a different skillset, but one is not necessarily more difficult than the other.

CAD models loosen a lot of restrictions which bind creativity in the real thing. That's a good thing, but sometimes it's those restrictions that make building real models interesting. Some of my favorite models are ones where I wonder "How did they manage to make that stay together?". That feeling is kind of lost with a computer model. When I build, I personally prefer to use physical bricks because I'll be sifting through my disorganized box of parts and see one part which spawns an idea for a whole subassembly. Even with a huge library in LDraw, I've never quite gotten the same effect.

At the end of the day, we have to remember that this is an art form, and the medium you choose is open to criticism. I happen to think that unless it's expertly ray-traced, a CAD model simply lacks the polish of a well-photographed LEGO sculpture.
Permalink
| January 2, 2009, 5:46 pm
This is slightly off topic, but is there any way to better ray trace work from LDD without porting over to LDraw first? I seam to loose pieces and piece positioning when I export files to LDraw's format, so I'd like to skip that step if possible. I have searched for solution but have so far found none. I'd hate to have to rebuild everything I've made in LDD (nearly 400 files) just to get better pictures.
Permalink
| January 4, 2009, 1:29 am
I view LDD as Pick A Brick, except better. Really - the same parts as PAB, except you can attach them to eachother. I mean, I don't think you can build stuff at the store.

In other news, 100th post.
Permalink
| January 4, 2009, 6:18 pm
I don´t like bulding both in LDD and LDraw: LDD is easy to work but has a to low piece variety. LDraw has anything you may need, no exeption, but is very boring to use it, you take a to long time to find only one piece.
Lego is meant to be hold on hands and played with. Building in real life outrank any computer program. Bruno
Permalink
| January 4, 2009, 6:19 pm
God, I can't use LDD to save my life. I like to be able to see and feel the bricks in real life. A CGI model doesn't have the same appeal.
Permalink
| January 4, 2009, 10:28 pm
Same here. I utterly despise that program. A lot of building techniques I use cannot be tested in LDD.
Permalink
| January 5, 2009, 1:17 am
I think my creation "Magnus Formica" turned out to be pretty sick, and it was made using LDD...
Permalink
| January 10, 2009, 2:34 pm
Honestly who would use a computer animated (short of having not enough LEGO parts)? who here would not enjoy the satisfaction of having spent hours on a creation to know that it was you and not some program, and to not be able to have that feeling you get when your finally done building a long-spent-on project to have accomplished it and add your own special building style into that creation instead of using a machine.
Futhermore no program can take away the memories we have when we say "hey this is the piece i used when building etc." A program cannot posably have all the pieces that someone else could have whether it is new, old, or present. Nor could it have rare, custom made, or usable weapons ( Brickarms, Brickforge, LittleArmory). I hope every person that has every built with LEGO ,Young or Old, hears this.
Permalink
| January 12, 2009, 6:33 pm
Just off the top of my head - here is a top ten list of reasons to use digital Lego:

10) Its easy to reproduce instructions to share or help build copies of a single model

9) Use it as a preliminary design phase for large or complicated models

8) Generate a parts list for ordering Lego

7) With good rendering, you can produce images superior to photos unless you also have an expensive camera with a macro lens.

6) You can take apart another person's creation without getting yelled at.

5) Infinite pieces!

4) Photoshop works better on digital Lego

3) No need for a brick separator (or teeth)

2) Its easier to carry a laptop than tens of thousands of pieces.

And the number one reason to use digital Lego....

1) Digital Lego seldom hurts when you step on it.
Permalink
| January 12, 2009, 11:01 pm
I agree with everything legobendy just said.
Permalink
| January 15, 2009, 12:39 am
 Group admin 
Quoting CEO Wraith
yes...but when you look at a picture of a moc you are looking at a digital reproduction of the creation, whether its origins are from real lego or digital lego any viewer won't have a tactile sense of a creation, so either way a creation will be lessened by posting it...


Very true. But presentation is stage two of the process, and not as important to me as the act of building itself (although, still important to some degree to be sure!). So I suppose it's up to each of us to decide why we enjoy LEGO. Is it for the building process itself, or more for the experience of sharing what we built with others? (which usually becomes a digital process unless you're talking about a LUG group or something like that)

This is an old arguement in the art world. The digital medium has, in certain circles and genres, replaced the physical act of creating imagery (advertising, publishing, fantasy art are all good examples). No universal conclusion has ever been reached, but many now feel the digital medium is just that...an additional medium to add to the list of other mediums with which images can be created.

I would consider it the same for LEGO (at least to some degree). Just the way photoshop emulates a real brush, MLCad and the like emulate real bricks. They're different, each with advantages and disadvantages, and I think it's up to each of us to decide for ourselves what our priorities are, and which medium best serves those priorities.

In the end, my guess why digital creations get less attention is because the majority of builders still enjoy the actual building process, and so don't relate as well. That doesn't mean digital work's not good, or not relevant. It just indicates to me where most builders priorities seem to lie for the time being.

Thoughts?
Permalink
| January 15, 2009, 12:32 pm
LDD is a tool, and just as with any tool, there're going to be people who use it for both good and evil. I've seen some stuff, especially on Lego's Factory gallery itself, that is obviously created by a bunch of children whose idea of a car is still a box on wheels. (Just remember that they eventually came out with those Scions, which are basically the same thing, so go figure). On sites like this one and Brickshelf, I've also seen people make some very imaginative and professional looking creations.

As someone relatively new to the hobby, I've really been enjoying LDD lately because I don't have that many Lego sets that I want to try and cannibalize from, and this has given me the opportunity to experiment. I've been playing around with it lately, and have ordered one of my creations which will hopefully come any day now. Once I get it, I plan on not only putting it together, but also trying to see how I can improve it beyond what the digital representation would let me do. I think it's a great tool for exactly that, visualizing a representation, and then building that representation in real life to then go back and improve the process.

As for digital vs. physical art in general, I've never been able to draw to save my life, but I can build technical cross sections with Adobe Illustrator at work that amaze even myself.
Permalink
| January 15, 2009, 10:35 pm
And many times, building in computer and in real life become different things for different persons.. Many times, people who build awesome MOCs in computer have no idea of how to build in real life.
Take a look at this guy for example:
http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=Bryce2501
He builds awesome planes, but I don´t think he has the artistic sense we have when we catch the model with hands and fell it. Even because, in real life, you never could build all those planes at the same time. (only if you spend all Mark Kelso´s invisible hand money on bricklink.)
Bruno
Permalink
| January 17, 2009, 2:07 pm
becos it shows that you dont do lego as your hobby, but a peice of software as ur hobby.
Permalink
| January 21, 2009, 4:00 pm
Quoting Brenden Wilson
I enjoy physically building with lego, it's a hands on problem solving activity that gets me away from starring at a computer screen - which I spend enough time doing for photography.

I just think that people who settle for building entirely (or at least presenting online entirely) with a program such as LDD are really missing the point of the hobby all together.


You took the words right out of my mouth.

Permalink
| January 28, 2009, 6:06 am
 Group admin 
Well said, Brenden
Permalink
| January 28, 2009, 9:32 am
a lot of people are really down on LDD and its counterparts. Oh, well. Lets just agree to disagree, I suppose. In the mean time, I have started a new group just for Digital Lego of all sorts. Its open to all, and all are welcome - even if you do not build in digital Lego, you are all still welcome to partake in any conversations.

http://www.mocpages.com/group.php/1285
Permalink
| January 31, 2009, 9:21 pm
A lot of people, myself included, look down on LDD because of the program's capacity, or lack there of. If one builds physically, the possibilities are endless. LDD becomes incredibly hard to load after a certain amount of pieces have been used. The photos are also horrible, and the lack of lighting doesn't show any detail unless the detail is too obvious. So what happens is that people get fed up with the speed, and they build horrible Mocs to get something done; to redeem their failure.

People also use LDD as an alternative to buying sets. This is sad, indeed. You never get the feel for building unless your hands turn callous from building!

Besides, Lego(R) was meant to expand your mind, and a computer screen kills brain cells. It kind of defeats the purpose, right?
Permalink
| January 31, 2009, 10:22 pm
I wouldn't say that LDD hurts my creativity. I would like certain excluded pieces to be there, and I would like certain building techniques to be available, but the limitations have forced my to figure out new ways of doing things.

Slowing down of the program can be a problem, but that appears to be a limitation of the computer more than the program. One MOC I haven't posted yet sits at over 3,400 pieces, and even on my Laptop the slow down isn't too horrible. An even larger model I was working (I didn't get a piece count, but it was over 150x40 studs in size) was much more difficult to work with - once I can get to my more powerful desktop, though, it might be more feasible. If there is a hard upper limit for model sizes in LDD, I haven't reached it yet.

As for photos - I agree there! Some photoshopping can help a little, but really better rendering is the key. I have seen some phenomenal renderings of MOCs, but those were all from other programs. I have been looking for a way to better render LDD models, but so far to no avail. Converting the LDD model to LDraw first would work, except that the conversion often rearranges the pieces, so no help there.

I do miss the tactile experience of actual Lego, of course, but since LDD is an intermediary step for me, its only a matter of time before I start transferring my models into reality. Digital Lego is a different experience, but not a worse one.
Permalink
| February 4, 2009, 5:53 am
Of course, I completely understand. The piece count slows the process on my computer, but I do believe a desktop computer has a higher piece capacity. I did use LDD to build models before I took them into a tangible realm before. But now, most of my parts are non-existent on LDD. I could always buy them, but as somone pointed out, the price is higher than If I just built something else.

Sure, you can build something in more than one way. But you can't really decide which way is better, because you can only experience the secenario through a limited amount of actions.

As for the photo thing, real models have LDD beat hands down. Of course, there are people who like to use LDD. But I can't break the addiction to the cool, hard ABS plastic gripped in my hands as I build. You just can't get a physical bond to your models if you build them on LDD and never take it any further.
Permalink
| February 4, 2009, 9:52 pm
For one, I just don't enjoy looking at rendered Lego images, LDD especially, as they look fake (which they are) and I find it hard to focus on anything beyond the fact that it isn't real.

But mainly, I think LDD takes away the process of actually building with lego, which for me is the best part. When I build, my model is a constantly evolving thing, that ends up (usually) nothing like my original plan. Digital rendering takes away the ability to just go with the flow as it were, to just build for the sake of it. And most of all, though the usable parts in LDD are limited, the number of them is not, which takes away the originality and technique creation which a lack of parts can create.
Permalink
| February 5, 2009, 12:52 am
Behold, one of our own has enlightened us all!

Almost like he stole the words right outa' my mouth. Excellent point of view, Nathan!
Permalink
| February 5, 2009, 4:18 pm
I like LDD because it allows me to swap out parts without having to remove lots of pieces, and I can make modifications to a model while still keeping a copy of the original. I can easily improve my designs or try something different without too much hassle.

As for photography: I don't have such a great camera, so LDD screenshots will pretty much match the quality of my pictures of real Lego.
Permalink
| February 9, 2009, 11:38 pm
But your missing something there. In LDD, yes, you can swap out parts and modify your model without any hassle. When I want to do this, yes, I do have to take out many bricks to redo it. But as I'm replacing them, I realize more ways I can improve it. And by the time I'm done, I've revamped many parts instead of the one I was focusing on.

LDD also gives you unlimited pieces. Imagination starts with limitation, guys. Building with what you have is so much more fun. Of course, I don't go to bricklink, so I DO have a limited selection.
Permalink
| February 10, 2009, 4:39 pm
Indeed. I do not think digital Lego is any better than real Lego, but it does have its merits, and having unlimited parts to work with can lead to some pretty amazing stuff. I present to you Exhibit A: the work of Mr. Darren Byrne. http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/51929 I wish I could use LDraw competently.
Permalink
| February 10, 2009, 7:04 pm
True, LDraw does have benefits. But like I said in a previous comment: it would be incredibly slow on some computers. My laptop would probably crash if I tried something that big. Now granted, LDD is fun when I'm at school and bored to death, but I do love the since of looking at a physical model. I just love to hold it in my hand, to toy around with it, you know? Lego was meant to be played with. I can't play with it on my computer, so it really defeats the purpose of building it anyway.

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree.
Permalink
| February 10, 2009, 8:36 pm
This is how I see building digitally:
LDD is better for building models that represent a theme, Halo, star wars, zelda ect. because you realy can't flow when building themes. Or at least I can't... it is horrible for building things strait from your imagination. Like nathan said you can't flow, get into a role with building digitally. Another benefit though... If your building in a theme and someone says he doesn't like so and so or how you can make it more acurate you can easily change it.
Permalink
| February 15, 2009, 6:47 pm
Fact: you burn more calories looking for a piece than actually building a model in real life.

Myth: this also happens on LDD.
Permalink
| February 15, 2009, 7:33 pm
Virtual Lego ain't bad. I prefer real MOCs obviously. But sometime I find a good virtual MOC and rate it fairly...


Permalink
| February 16, 2009, 4:15 am
The way I see LDD is that it should only be used to build something from a video game, a novel or a Movie because you can't flow when your building these models, and you can't flow in LDD. Whenever I'm building models from movies, games, novels, I can never get into a "role" I can only do that if I'm being imaginary. LDD you can't get into a "role" so it really should be only used t build somthing of a certian theme. Actually, my space creations arn't as good as they could of been because of LDD.
Permalink
| February 16, 2009, 7:44 am
Yeah, there is a point that Cupid made. When building from a theme, there is less imagination than if you built as a freelance.

Some LDD creations are spectacular. They are made excellently, and they look good. LDraw is great, too. May I refer you to the LDraw beauties over at John Lamarack's page? Did I spell that right? Correct me if I'm wrong.
Permalink
| February 16, 2009, 4:40 pm
I really dislike LDD because it takes too long is alot harder to use than an ideal program
Permalink
| February 28, 2009, 10:59 pm
LDraw is faster in many cases, but LDD is easier to purchase from. But actual building costs nothing, well, almost nothing. You still have to purchase the bricks.


Permalink
| February 28, 2009, 11:15 pm
I use both LDD and physical LEGO. Each have their strengths. When I want to teach a technique I often use LDD. that way i can change the color of bricks without taking anything apart. I can upload the LDD file so that somebody can take it apart and learn.
When i need to make something that uses a whole bunch of tiny little parts i use LDD. I am limited in real life to a small number of the same part, but not in LDD.
When I want to make something awesome, nothing compares to physical LEGO. My MarsCorp theme is awesome because it is real. You can actually pick it up and play with it. I tried making the same models in LDD, but its just not the same.
Permalink
| July 12, 2010, 4:58 pm
Well i do not have a problem with LDD but i do feel that it is somewhat easier to build with physical bricks mainly be cause you can do stuff with real Lego that you cant do in LDD plus the fact that you don't get to touch and feel stuff in LDD and rely there are a lot o colors that LDD doesn't have.
Permalink
| July 13, 2010, 9:47 pm
Quoting Dagger706 (Dagger-Dragon)
Honestly who would use a computer animated (short of having not enough LEGO parts)? who here would not enjoy the satisfaction of having spent hours on a creation to know that it was you and not some program, and to not be able to have that feeling you get when your finally done building a long-spent-on project to have accomplished it and add your own special building style into that creation instead of using a machine.
Futhermore no program can take away the memories we have when we say "hey this is the piece i used when building etc." A program cannot posably have all the pieces that someone else could have whether it is new, old, or present. Nor could it have rare, custom made, or usable weapons ( Brickarms, Brickforge, LittleArmory). I hope every person that has every built with LEGO ,Young or Old, hears this.
Could not have said it better my self.

Permalink
| July 13, 2010, 9:55 pm
Ok, I'mma say this once.
IF YOU AIN'T GOT THE MONEY, THEN WHATCHA GONNA DO? >:-(
I personally find LDD models kinda...bad, but MLCad, a much better cad version of the software is available, I myself still use it now that most of my LEGO has gone to rellies.
I will admit that hand built models ARE good, but don't immediately overlook a LEGO creation just because it is built in LDD.
People think digital programs are easier to use....I must ask, HAVE YOU USED ONE?
Getting the model built in a program may SOUND easy, but let myself and a fair few people on Flickr such as Tim say that...BOY...how wrong you are, in real bricks it is easier to make connections, and little bits, as a 3d representation there is very little depth perception, and sometimes you have to guess where you want the piece. Building 1/25th scale cars in a digital program IS HARD, Building spaceships is HARD..but if you want to build minifigs, then, please, get your head checked out.
An all round builder with MLCad un-rendered, also real stuff: http://www.flickr.com/photos/34580993@N08/

Swoofty, a Train Man in MLCad and rendered (and real): http://www.flickr.com/photos/swoofty/

Anthony Sava (builds first, then made Cad versions): http://www.flickr.com/photos/savatheaggie/
Permalink
| July 14, 2010, 12:36 am
I'm actually a little disappointed in some of these comments. Personally, I don't have a lot of money and neither does my family (screw the economy)so obviously I don't get a new lego set all the time. Digital programs like LDD, Ldraw, MLcad, etc. are ways around the price of the bricks. Not only that, but it also opens more possibilities depending on what your goal is. Sure, a lot of MOCs on LDD suck. But there are actually a lot of good ones over looked because of the bad ones. Not only that, but it's the fact that many of you don't want look at it because of your numerous amount of reasons against those MOCs. Lego is Lego, digital or tangible. Digital is no less of the lego experience (especially because of the limited pieces for lDD)ans it helps you think in different ways. The hobby hasn't changed, it's still lego building, but like I saw someone else say, it just uses a different skill set. Trust me, I'd rather build with real legos any day, but unfortunately, this is all I have. I think my latest MOC, the HMS Churchill came out great. If you want to go and look, be my guest.
Permalink
| July 28, 2010, 8:44 am
Quoting Architect of Vonthako
You guys have brought up a lot of good points on both sides of this discussion.

Personally, I don’t use LDD (though I have tried it). I use a combination of LeoCAD, MLCAD, and LDView (all based on LDraw).

My two kopek’s worth on the topic is this: Many people (like myself) who use digital LEGO put in a lot of time, effort, and creativity into a creation. And some things are actually harder to do in a LEGO computer program than with real, ABS-plastic LEGOs (like positioning a minifig).

Also, saying “Digital MOCs are not LEGO because you use a computer program instead of plastic!” is like saying “Anything written using a keyboard is not real writing because you’re not using a clay tablet!”.

Technology advances, and new art forms evolve from it.


Couldn't agree more.
Permalink
| July 28, 2010, 11:08 am
I can understand all the pro digital positions and all the contra digital positions at the same time. I really understand the money argument, but you can say what you want nothing will ever beat the real deal! I use MLCad myself, because I don´t have all the parts in stock that I need for building what I want. Especially when it comes to bigger creations. Personally, I think, as a tool of designing a MOC digital modelling is o.k., but it should always be turned into real bricks!
Permalink
| September 27, 2010, 3:12 pm
I think that with LDD or other dgtal lego programs you can make better models of ships and stuff. I, for example, do not have the kind of poeces to build...say...an Enterprise E. So i built it on LDD. Then I ordered the pieces. There are tons of LDD that are better than some real lfe, and there are DEFNATELY some that are nothing but awful. Many people use LDD and then buy their creations. Their creations become hits, but no one knows that they were from LDD.
Permalink
| October 1, 2010, 5:14 pm
I dislike looking at people's stuf they made in LDD because you can't get the great camera angles and lighting effects you can get in a physical model. That, and I can't comment on how well-built it was structurally. If it stays together in real life, it was well-built. If it stays together in a program, who knows? Also, I found it really irritating to use. I may see my piece perfectly attached from one angle, but it's actually five studs to the left and higher than it needs to be.
Permalink
| October 2, 2010, 8:06 pm
Hmm... Maybe cause it's lot easier to build big stuff in LDD, like a big house like those from lego direct. BTW I've just bought a space ship (Designed by me), Should be shipped next week. I'll post it, so please keep an eye on my page!

Permalink
| May 21, 2011, 4:25 pm
As a user of LDD, I personally would like to say I would much prefer to build using my own hands rather than clicking a mouse and staring at a computer screen all day. The reason I use LDD as opposed to building with my own two hands is the fact that I am a minor without a stable income. LDD allows me to make larger builds with the pieces I wish to use in unlimited amounts. I find the limitations of the program extremely frustrating, but at least it gives me an opportunity to do things with legos that I wouldn't be able to do normally.
Permalink
| August 23, 2011, 11:15 pm
Innvation through limitation. Having limited real-world resources forces the artist to discover new ways of doing things.
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| September 12, 2011, 1:10 pm
I, unlike other LDD users, kn ow a way around the limited pallete and color choices. download my helicarrier, i used yellow engine cowlings, not red. if anyone asks, I'm happy to share my secret.
Zack
Permalink
| January 17, 2012, 10:37 am
I like the unlimited ammount of bricks available in LDD. I love the design process with LDD being able to built many different versions of the model before getting to the "final" one.

During this process I start modifying the model by making a copy of the whole one an go on working on the copy. Then I make another copy and go on and on like this until I get my final version. Meanwhile I can decide to combine the front of version #3 with the back of #8 without dismounting the whole model.

At the end of the building process I'll have a file with all the versions placed next to each other in one or more rows. Then I take the last one and make a new file only with this one.

When I started building with LDD there was only the "Design by me" mode which only has a limited choice of bricks. And the collection changed between the versions, too. But having first the "Universe" and then the "Extended" mode a lot of bricks have been made available. So now there are few limitations in LDD.

I still try to use mostly the "Design by Me" bricks as they also can be ordered via "Pick a Brick". After finishing the LDD design process I usually try to build the model with real bricks using my collection. Missing parts are ordered via "Pick A Brick" or "BrickLink".

I really like LDD models but at the end I love to see the "plastic" version, too.

But I also think it's cool to use LDD to make a big project one would never try to build in "real life".
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| January 17, 2012, 11:32 am
yeah, that side of it is very cool, im not going to go off on a whole long thing bout a project tonight, ill add that tomorrow. dont forget to see my group MarsCorp
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| January 18, 2012, 9:53 pm
Being able to use a program like LEGO Digital Designer is very useful to the builder. I don't think that an LDD design being used as a MOC is as impressive as a physical build because there lacks a certain challenge. LDD affords you nearly every available piece and at unlimited quantities. It should therefore be used as a tool for testing the possibility of concepts to be applied to the physical build. There are exceptions, however. There are those that can't justify dropping the necessary funds that makes a collection possible, which is why I still take the time to look at LDD creations, though, admittedly, I don't often comment on them.
Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 7:11 pm
Being that I use LDD alot due to my lack of Legos, I would agree with most of the people before me why its looked down upon with its pros and cons.

I also find it hard when I build things on there to find out how strong something is. My latest creation (which I ended up buying as a final horah for the closing of the Design By Me), I had found out that my ship's engine was badly installed as it was only connected in two places. I ended up wiring the part together as I do not have much other options.

Basically, the thing needs a gravity option to see if the creation bends in the wrong places from its weight lol. I find that building something by hand is more satisfying then finalizing something on my screen. Which is also one of the reasons why my Y8 project hasn't been seeing much updates. It gets hard on the eyes after awhile and I get tired.

Even though, other things I have liked about LDD was the ability to reproduce past models that I have built and have easily remembered, an example being most of my car creations.
Permalink
| February 25, 2012, 8:34 pm
Quoting Tuskano Raidaro
Being that I use LDD alot due to my lack of Legos, I would agree with most of the people before me why its looked down upon with its pros and cons.

I also find it hard when I build things on there to find out how strong something is. My latest creation (which I ended up buying as a final horah for the closing of the Design By Me), I had found out that my ship's engine was badly installed as it was only connected in two places. I ended up wiring the part together as I do not have much other options.

Basically, the thing needs a gravity option to see if the creation bends in the wrong places from its weight lol. I find that building something by hand is more satisfying then finalizing something on my screen. Which is also one of the reasons why my Y8 project hasn't been seeing much updates. It gets hard on the eyes after awhile and I get tired.

Even though, other things I have liked about LDD was the ability to reproduce past models that I have built and have easily remembered, an example being most of my car creations.


I prefer to build by hand when possible, but that is sadly not always the case seeing i'm usually on the move when i have time to do something for myself or build.for me at least there's also the financial side of things, living on student loans doesn't leave me with a lot of money to spend on things and i'd rather use the money i do have spare to spend time with friends and go out and such.
That's the main reason i use LDD more than physical bricks, the moneys.

Permalink
| April 6, 2012, 9:45 am
Why even ask that question? I've seen both great creations made with LDD and very bad ones made IRL. So what's the problem? (Hmmmm should i make a call to James Cameron and tell him, that Avatar is junk, because he used computer-animation??)
I only build in LDD and doing allright!!

Permalink
| September 18, 2012, 5:18 pm
Quoting Chrispy Bacon
I think my creation "Magnus Formica" turned out to be pretty sick, and it was made using LDD...


I agree. I made the DS9 station in LDD and i'm think it looks great.
Permalink
| September 19, 2012, 3:30 pm
As the most of you said - there are points of pro and contra... I use both ways to built - LDD and real bricks. And yes like Mark said it is cooler to touch the bricks, to hear the sound (for me it's like music ;-)! ), but on the other hand especially for kids who haven't a sort over 50.000 bricks it's a beautiful way to be creative! Creative... i think both ways have there rights to be shown! In real live i go with trial and error - but also in LDD is this my way - so i don't understand what's the core of the discussion-?? In LDD you must sometimes find tricky ways to get some pieces in place - in real live you "just" do it. ALso in LDD you sometimes need a calculator to get some hinges right... At the moment i work on the Nostromo in LDD... Sometimes i built sections in real bricks to look how they work, but to know what i want to order i'm happy about this nice little "help"-programm! Whatever... this shouldn't be disrespectful!!! But there are many kids who haven't a sort like Mark Kelso (you are a wonderfull builder by the way ;-)! ) But maybe these kids get more into the feeling - and want to buy some parts if they have the money later... ;-) So be respectful to everybody => real bricks or LDD. A friend of mine would say: you are nearly 30 and play with bricks :-) ? But even better as you would spent every weekend on the bar...!!!
Permalink
| October 27, 2012, 1:23 pm
Quoting Mihe Stonee
As the most of you said - there are points of pro and contra... I use both ways to built - LDD and real bricks. And yes like Mark said it is cooler to touch the bricks, to hear the sound (for me it's like music ;-)! ), but on the other hand especially for kids who haven't a sort over 50.000 bricks it's a beautiful way to be creative! Creative... i think both ways have there rights to be shown! In real live i go with trial and error - but also in LDD is this my way - so i don't understand what's the core of the discussion-?? In LDD you must sometimes
find tricky ways to get some pieces in place - in real live you "just" do it. ALso in LDD you sometimes need a calculator to get some hinges right... At the
moment i work on the Nostromo in LDD... Sometimes i built sections in real bricks to look how they work, but to know what i want to order i'm happy about
this nice little "help"-programm! Whatever... this shouldn't be disrespectful!!!
But there are many kids who haven't a sort like Mark Kelso (you are a
wonderfull builder by the way ;-)! ) But maybe these kids get more into the
feeling - and want to buy some parts if they have the money later... ;-) So be
respectful to everybody => real bricks or LDD. A friend of mine would say: you
are nearly 30 and play with bricks :-) ? But even better as you would spent
every weekend on the bar...!!!

I have to agree with you. To get the generation young to continue the Lego love we need to be up to date with tech. LDD is a massive creation portal for imaginative creations large and small. I have my 5 year old building cars etc already on LDD and then putting them into reality. You can see in his eyes the satisfaction and pride of what he has done. I myself love the free hand build and find LDD frustrating in the time sense; Work, life and family give me periodic build time and it is a very soothing time away from a computer and solely using hand and brain.
Basically if it's Lego related, it's good.

Permalink
| October 29, 2012, 8:15 am
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