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Shield systems
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Many of us build spacecraft with shield systems as part of the design, but have you given thought to what a shield is exactly? Is it majic? a barrier made out of energy? a warping of space which neutralizes kinetic energy? cloud of particles? magnetic field? I'm interested to know your thoughts on how a shield would work.
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| April 30, 2010, 12:30 pm
My guess is a high intensity magnetetic field. But Colonial Battlestars like the Galactica have heavy armor plating that can withstand multiple direct nuclear detonations. This is in addition to smashing into and even through enemy ships. Armor vs shields? Hmmm...
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| April 30, 2010, 1:28 pm
Shields are for wimps and cowards.

Also, stun settings are for people who can't commit.
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| April 30, 2010, 4:47 pm
Quoting Areetsa C
Shields are for wimps and cowards.

Also, stun settings are for people who can't commit.

I guess that's one way of looking at it...
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| April 30, 2010, 9:15 pm
Quoting Areetsa C
Shields are for wimps and cowards.

Also, stun settings are for people who can't commit.


I agree, but tasers are pretty cool...
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| April 30, 2010, 10:11 pm
I think microwaves or some sort of radio energy feild could be generated to counter energy weapons. But I don't believe that there would be a way of "shielding" any physical projectiles other than good ole' iron plating.

Peace ~ Packie
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| May 11, 2010, 7:11 pm
The dune books describe a shield that robs kinetic energy from an object in motion. The faster the object, the better the shield repels it. However, if a laser is fired on a shield, it starts feedback between the shield and laser weapon, destroying both in a massive explosion.

Another possibility i have though of is a particle shield, where a magnetic field holds various particles in a sphere around the object. This would mimic the van allen radiation shield around the earth. An artificial van allen field may be the best bet for a shield system using existing technology. It would be limited by the amount of ozone available to use as fuel, but it would grow in strength in response to increases in radiation. Add some iron shavings to the mix, and you may be able to detonate enemy missiles at the field boundary rather than let them hit your spaceship.

As for armor, metal sponge is beginning to be used in commercial satellites. It is designed to shred projectiles into progressively smaller pieces. Smaller pieces have less inertia and do less damage.
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| June 6, 2010, 6:26 pm
I with him^
I always figured a "Shield" would be an incredibly strong magnetic field that carries super charged plasma around the outside.
I figured it'd vapourise missiles, or cause them to detonate and it would, on impact, completely disintegrate any sort of projectile weapon, or disperse energy weapons fire.
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| June 12, 2010, 5:51 am
Yes, that way the paint won't get scratched up, either. Can you imagine how expensive it is hammering out the dings in dry dock?
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| June 16, 2010, 3:17 pm
Quoting El Barto !
Yes, that way the paint won't get scratched up, either. Can you imagine how expensive it is hammering out dents in dry dock?

I've got a pretty good imagination.
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| June 16, 2010, 3:27 pm
Quoting Christian Collins
I've got a pretty good imagination.

I think the exact quote is: "I don't know, I can imagine quite a bit!"
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| June 16, 2010, 5:17 pm
One of my favorite concepts when it comes to shields is the Atmosphere Armor concept. An electric current flows through an area of air, ionizing it and solidifying it into a charged wall. Excellent for stopping projectiles, but it's a system that has to remain stationary. The idea is grounded in the work of Nicola Tesla.
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| June 28, 2010, 7:35 pm
He had all sorts of ideas. Look up HAARP. There's an array in Alaska. They say it can change the weather and create earthquakes, just for starters.
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| June 28, 2010, 10:15 pm
I don't typically "use" shields in my space ships. I always found shields cheap, but I imagine my ships have a weak shield that redirects general small space debris away from the hull of the ship. Rarely militarized because it consumes so much energy.
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| July 12, 2010, 10:28 am
I like classic shielding like in Star Trek, but it has always bothered me that you can't see the shield emitters on the hulls.
So when I build a space craft, i make it a point to show where the shield emitters are (I see them as a kind of lens or something. I mostly use dots or dishes.
I use domes when I need to show off a very powerful shield generator.
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| September 18, 2010, 7:55 pm
The ship projects a bubble of inert gas that is contained within a electromagnetic field, electricity is passed through the gas and it becomes super heated within the magnetic field, the gas reaches a temperature of 300,000,000 degrees which vaporizes any solid that passes through it and the electromagnetic bubble stops any radiation or other form of energy such as a energy weapon from hitting the Hull of the vessel
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| November 10, 2010, 4:35 am
Quoting Empire of Rumination
The ship projects a bubble of inert gas that is contained within a electromagnetic field, electricity is passed through the gas and it becomes super heated within the magnetic field, the gas reaches a temperature of 300,000,000 degrees which vaporizes any solid that passes through it and the electromagnetic bubble stops any radiation or other form of energy such as a energy weapon from hitting the Hull of the vessel


How do you keep it from melting the ship? is the bubble filled with gas or is the gas in a thin membrane like the soap of a soap bubble?
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| November 10, 2010, 2:46 pm
Quoting JWG 258

How do you keep it from melting the ship? is the bubble filled with gas or is the gas in a thin membrane like the soap of a soap bubble?



its a thin membrane
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| November 11, 2010, 4:12 am
My science-fiction nations use particle shields, which can stop most ballistics very well, but are vulnerable to EMP and strong radiation.

@Empire of Rumination - how do you stop the radiated heat from three hundred million degrees of plasma from melting the ship simply through infrared radiation?
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| November 13, 2010, 6:05 pm
Shields on my ships are generally Electromagnetic field generators, or EMF shields. These generators create a field that can cause most metallic ballistic rounds to be deflected, if not largely decelerated. They are good against any weapons that have an ionic charge, such as plasma weapons.
Shields come in civilian grades, and military grades. Civilian grades go upto 5, while military can go upto 10. Civilian grade 5 is roughly equivalent in power to military grade 1.

Armour-wise, most ships nowadays in my fleet have titanium-aluminum alloy plating with a thin layer of tungsten coating the outside of the hull in combination with an insulative material to avoid most thermal damage.
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| October 1, 2011, 5:21 pm
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